PDA

View Full Version : teaching an old dog music theory



P.H.Delarran
01-14-2007, 09:41 PM
I have some musical background, having played the violin in school for ten years growing up. Unfortunately my teachers were negligent when it came to theory. I did begin a basic theory course when I was about 14, but funding was dropped and so was the class. I can read music and have to have written music in order to play. ( I do still play some, and tinkle on the piano.)
My husband is one who just 'gets' music. He can pick up any instrument and after a brief exploration, he can play it relatively well. He does not need to read music to play it. He can hear a song and work it out quickly on an instrument. I don't let him near my violin- he shows me up! :D
Anyway, a few years ago, he decided to learn theory from the books side and I tried to join him. I remembered loving that aspect of music when I was exposed as a teen. But now (because I'm older??? gasp!), I find it much harder to learn for some reason. SO difficult for me that I gave up. He also tried just teaching me verbally (and hands on) what he knew about chords and such. But he overwhelmed me. He knows so much and it seems to come naturally for him, and it's hard to start at the beginning I think (is there one??) He wants to show me the whole picture all at once.
But I'd love to find a simpler approach and try again. I'd love to be able to 'jam' on my fiddle with friends, to pop in and play a harmony or two. To work out a tune I heard, and better yet, some of the tunes that I've created in my head.
What techniques have others here used to learn theory?

moblues
01-14-2007, 11:29 PM
Yes. There are easier ways of learning theory. The CAGED method is the best springboard.

How much do you as an artist need?

My studies into the Berkley Method took two years. I was lucky in the fact that I loved the idiom. It helped.




Mike

mooncars
01-14-2007, 11:55 PM
Yer not the Lone Arranger here! ;) I've played for over 30 years and don't know squat about theory. I played french horn in middle school then fell behind and gave up. All my playing is from self-inflicted learning. I can, as your husband does, pick up on any instrument in a few minutes.

At my greatly advanced age of 46, learning simple things befuddles me.

Rick

RG570
01-15-2007, 12:34 AM
I'm entirely self taught, but I did eventually pick up theory. Before doing so, I figured it wasn't necessary. But now that I know what I know, which still isn't a lot but more than 99% of people who say they "play guitar", the difference is like night and day.

It's easy to learn these things on your own, or at least it was for me. The internet is full of easy to understand lessons about music.

P.H.Delarran
01-15-2007, 12:39 AM
How much do you as an artist need?

I just want to know enough basics to find my way around. Basic chord structure. Basic keys and scales. Shortcuts to changing between keys for my instrument. These are things that I do understand when it's shown to me, but have difficulty remembering it to put into practice. I do learn best with visual aid in learning, but I also respond well to rhymes and anagrams as memorization tools. I think I just need a structure presented to me in a way that uses my learning style.
I'm pretty good with rythym but I could use some refreshing, not something that would be difficult for me if I put my mind to it. I would however like a better understanding of the rythym structures that are specific to different music genres. And basic key structure for some genres as well. So, say I wanted to jump on on a blues jam, I would know the basic sequence of chord changes and beat structure.
I also want to know some basics for structuring a piece.
I'll look at the CAGED method - I assume googling is a good place to start?

truelyana
01-15-2007, 12:47 AM
I'm entirely self taught, but I did eventually pick up theory. Before doing so, I figured it wasn't necessary. But now that I know what I know, which still isn't a lot but more than 99% of people who say they "play guitar", the difference is like night and day.

It's easy to learn these things on your own, or at least it was for me. The internet is full of easy to understand lessons about music.

I'm the same. If i want to learn to play something, I'll take the initiative to teach myself. I have tons of instruments, lying around. I have used the internet for some lessons too. They do help and as our fellow friend RG570 mentioned, they are easy to understand.

moblues
01-15-2007, 01:24 AM
I'll look at the CAGED method - I assume googling is a good place to start?

Never use google. They use spybots to track your web movement. Try this link:

http://www.guitartools.co.uk/the_caged_method_of_learning_the_fretboard_-_lesson_by_lan_tran.html


If you need more, I'll follow up with whatever you need. (I'm sorry that I didn't mention that this is a guitar system).




Mike

P.H.Delarran
01-15-2007, 01:28 AM
Thanks Mike.
I'm not a guitarist, but it's on my want-to-learn list.

mooncars
01-15-2007, 04:06 AM
http://www.guitartools.co.uk/the_caged_method_of_learning_the_fretboard_-_lesson_by_lan_tran.html

If you need more, I'll follow up with whatever you need. (I'm sorry that I didn't mention that this is a guitar system).

Mike

Well, boop boop be doop! I looked at that link, and surprisingly, I rely on that method heavily. Must have learned it by accident as I fumbled on the fretboard for decades.

I feel smarter already.

ModoReese
01-19-2007, 03:31 AM
I was lucky enough to receive some music training when I took guitar lessons - but I was too young to truly "get" it. Since then I've been re-learning and honing my music theory knowledge at :

http://www.musictheory.net/

Dunno. What works for me, may not work for others. Another site I felt was good for teaching the basics was http://www.guitarchordsmagic.com/ (there's a link on the sidebar for Guitar Music Theory).

Michelle