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Pamster
01-14-2007, 12:44 AM
Is this right or is this right?

In my 20,700 word story, "Facets of Friendship", the main character is an overweight eleven year old who...

I just didn't want to finish the sentence, my question is on the punctuation on quote, this is aimed at queries, because I am doing it the above way because it seems right. Is it though?

I can reply with a detailed chapter by chapter outline and short synopsis for "Facets of Friendship".

Just looks wrong but is it? Should we use quotes around our book titles since italics don't show up in email? This is something I am wondering if maybe I am doing wrong...Any help on this is greatly appreciated. :)

Tish Davidson
01-14-2007, 03:08 AM
The comma goes inside the quotes, not outside.

Pamster
01-14-2007, 03:44 AM
Gotcha! Thanks Tish! :D

benbradley
01-14-2007, 06:18 AM
Is this right or is this right?

In my 20,700 word story, "Facets of Friendship", the main character is an overweight eleven year old who...

I just didn't want to finish the sentence, my question is on the punctuation on quote, this is aimed at queries, because I am doing it the above way because it seems right. Is it though?

I can reply with a detailed chapter by chapter outline and short synopsis for "Facets of Friendship".

Just looks wrong but is it? Should we use quotes around our book titles since italics don't show up in email? This is something I am wondering if maybe I am doing wrong...Any help on this is greatly appreciated. :)

Yes, as someone else said, the comma goes inside the quotes, and likewise, where the title in quotes is at the end of the sentence, the period goes inside the quotes, like this:
I can reply with a detailed chapter by chapter outline and short synopsis for "Facets of Friendship."

You might logically think the puntuation should go outside the quotes, and it does in computer programs (except in cases where it logically should go inside the quotes), but the English convention was surely around long before computers, and perhaps (this is a joke, sort of) before logic as well.

As far as whether to use quotes for a title, I think you should, but I'm not totally sure about it. I've seen an underscore used before and after a title, such as _Facets of Friendship_ but I think that's nonstandard. ISTR that in manuscript format it indicates italics[1]. I bet there are English usage guides that give coflicting advice on this. Heck, I think most anyone could write an English guide. PublishAmerica, are you listening?

And another rant note, italics usually do show up in "HTML email" but it's best to assume others don't have an email reader that interprets HTML, but only plain old text. If they don't and you send HTML, they'll see all those tags surrounded by < and > around the text, and it will be a best annoying, and at worst hard enough to read that they'll give up. HTML in email is bad - just don't do it.

1. So for manuscripts, with modern computers and word processing programs it's easy enough to generate bold, italics, and even superscript and subscript and all other sorts of fancy things, do editors now expect the actual stuff, or the old-fashioned indications that were always used on typewriters? I'm suspecting they still want the _indications_, as I've recently read something here about using monospaced Courrier font in submissions (which would otherwise seem a bit archaic).

maestrowork
01-14-2007, 08:11 AM
Use italics for book titles. No quotes.

Sandi LeFaucheur
01-14-2007, 04:44 PM
You might logically think the puntuation should go outside the quotes, and it does in computer programs (except in cases where it logically should go inside the quotes), but the English convention was surely around long before computers, and perhaps (this is a joke, sort of) before logic as well.

In England, the punctuation goes outside the quotes, unless it is directly related to what's inside the quote.

Please read my book "Facets of Friendship". but
"Who has read 'Facets of Friendship' by Pamster?" the editor asked.

Pamster
01-14-2007, 06:14 PM
I can only send plain text from the domain I was using, I have since gotten a gmail account and it [b]can[/] use italics, so is the general concensis to use Italics and Quotes? I asked a friend in England and the above is exactly what she told me so she's right for the UK, but for the US who I have been focusing my queries on I see now I was doing it wrong. OOPSIE! LOL! ;)

Man I love this place, I have learned an awful lot already just being around so many knowledgable people, thank you for your advice here and in all the places I've posted. This is such a great board, I just love it! :D

*does a happy dance*

Sandi LeFaucheur
01-14-2007, 06:32 PM
I'd use italics, no quotes. But be prepared for someone to disagree! (Pamster, I hope you don't mind me saying, but that moving picture is very hard on the eyes for people with migraines. It's cute, but distracting.)

Pamster
01-14-2007, 06:46 PM
I got rid of it Sandi, I'm sorry if it bothered anyone. :)

Jamesaritchie
01-14-2007, 07:01 PM
Italics and no quotation marks. Quotation marks are for direct or indirect quotes. Italics are used for titles.

Pamster
01-14-2007, 07:35 PM
Thanks Jamesaritchie, I will stick with the italics then. :D

Judg
01-15-2007, 09:25 PM
When italics are impossible, use underlining. That's what was done back in the typewriter era.

Judg, who had to write lots of essays on literary topics back in said era.