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View Full Version : My mini-list of words that annoy



Azure Skye
01-13-2007, 06:33 AM
Right now, these words annoy me and suffer from overuse syndrome. They're tired and need to rest.

edgy
fierce
flirty
whimsical

I will not use them in my ms.

Have any words you'd like to add?

Jadezuki
01-13-2007, 06:48 AM
-

janetbellinger
01-13-2007, 07:12 AM
"N-o-o-o" used in conversation

most descriptions of facial expressions or body language or physical descriptions of emotion, such as the feeling in the pit of the stomach etc.

PeeDee
01-13-2007, 07:44 AM
90% of all dialogue attrition. Do not gasp, jerk, ejaculate, snort, horrify, gloat, or any other word you can think. Just say it, with few exceptions. Pleeeeease.

Otherwise, it'll be "N-o-o-o," Pete bellowed in fiercly horrification.

Silver King
01-13-2007, 08:16 AM
I mentioned this one in an earlier thread, and I don't know why it drives me up a wall the way it does, but I can't stand hearing it:

"With that being said," to emphasize the previous statement.

Please stop saying that, or any derivative of the phrase, even while posting.

Okay, you can tease me now.:)

Shades of Humanity
01-13-2007, 08:27 AM
I saw your avatar and thought she's pretty - what can I say to be a little flirty- but after reading your post, you sounded kind of edgy.

With that being said, my attempts at flirtation usually makes the opposite sex nauseous. They tell me to stop listening to my damn emo music and cut my hair. I'm like, N-o-o-o. My hair is what makes me, me. I can't imagine the impact cutting it would have on my life.




okay, this isn't fun. It reminds me of grade school where it says: "Use the following words in a sentence":tongue

PeeDee
01-13-2007, 08:38 AM
All the words they use in formal business documents. Even the perfectly normal words are dressed trashy and made to walk in the gutter. And then you have words like "synergy" which was a whore from th start.

If you use "at this time," I'll kill you. :)

Chasing the Horizon
01-13-2007, 08:38 AM
Menacingly (really, ominously sounds so much better)
Hissed (as a speech tag like 'she hissed'. The she being referenced had better be a snake)

Silver King
01-13-2007, 08:43 AM
I saw your avatar and thought she's pretty
Are you talking to me or Azura?


With that being said

All right, now you've done it.

My attempts at flirtation usually makes the opposite sex nauseous.
It sure does. I think. I don't know. How could I be sure? I'm confused.

It reminds me of grade school
Me, too. I'm going back to recess now...

jbal
01-13-2007, 08:47 AM
This is unrelated, but I hate hearing that someone "needs no introduction". Unfailingly, it's said by someone introducing them.

ETA: the incorrect use of "literally" bugs the crap out of me too.
e.g. "It literally came down to the wire." what the hell does that mean?

PeeDee
01-13-2007, 08:48 AM
I hate my dad. I want to stay up late. Limp Bizkit rocks. I'm going to get a nose ring and a tattoo and a car. All my friends hate me too.

There. Can we move rapidly past this now :)

Silver King
01-13-2007, 08:58 AM
This is unrelated, but I hate hearing that someone "needs no introduction". Unfailingly, it's said by someone introducing them.
I never thought of that one before. I'm adding it to my list right now.

Really, if a person needs no introduction, they should walk out without any intentional fanfare. Literally.;)

Shades of Humanity
01-13-2007, 08:58 AM
This is unrelated, but I hate hearing that someone "needs no introduction". Unfailingly, it's said by someone introducing them.

ETA: the incorrect use of "literally" bugs the crap out of me too.
e.g. "It literally came down to the wire." what the hell does that mean?

One time we were hot air ballooning and it sprung a leak. Down we fell. Looking below, we saw houses and trees and telephone poles rapidly approaching. It became evident our balloon was gonna land in a tangled mess of power lines. It literally came down on the wire.



/I'm sorry for wasting 30 seconds of your life with that stupid story. And another 5 seconds for this apology.



Ergo. I hate that word. Ergo, I've decided never to use it again.

Carmy
01-13-2007, 09:44 AM
Gotten. Yech!

Higgins
01-13-2007, 07:10 PM
Menacingly (really, ominously sounds so much better)
Hissed (as a speech tag like 'she hissed'. The she being referenced had better be a snake)


I love menacingly and ominously and hissing............

Though often the character that does something "menacingly" gets decapitated in a few paragraphs....ominously enough.

Hissing though...now if done right that can keep a character alive for a few novels of otherwise indescriminant mayhem.

Higgins
01-13-2007, 07:12 PM
Ergo. I hate that word. Ergo, I've decided never to use it again.

You don't need Ergo in English.

Azure Skye
01-13-2007, 07:24 PM
This thread is cracking me up.

Literally. :tongue

Higgins
01-13-2007, 10:45 PM
This is unrelated, but I hate hearing that someone "needs no introduction". Unfailingly, it's said by someone introducing them.

ETA: the incorrect use of "literally" bugs the crap out of me too.
e.g. "It literally came down to the wire." what the hell does that mean?

Is anything in reality ever literally literal?

Even if there really was a wire and things came down to it...would it literally come down to it...unless the wire had "the wire" literally written on it?

Which brings us to "literal interpretation" ie no interpretation, ie it just says what it says, ie there is no interpretation in a literal interpretation....or there literally is no interpretation in a literal interpretation....unless one interprets "interpretation" "literally" as going from language A to language B, literally. But is that really, literally possible?

Tiger
01-13-2007, 11:04 PM
I hate "jive" when people mean "jibe"

Other than that, I agree with the person who brought up the ten-words-for-one, makeupyourowntosoundtrendy, turn-any-noun-into-a-verb tendencies of corporate speak.

Anyone wishing to "synergistically transition" into anything need not apply.

Jenan Mac
01-13-2007, 11:45 PM
"Awesome!"

Oh, Gods, do I hate that word. It's been on the banned words list for twenty years, and it still won't die.

If "Awesome!" is used by someone over the age of ten, it sounds even stupider, if that's possible. And if used by a member of the clergy, it's an immediate sign that they're going for your granny's pension, and probably wear a bad hairpiece.

Insert Name
01-14-2007, 12:12 AM
Fiction Novel

MyFirstMystery
01-14-2007, 12:58 AM
Poignant
Meaty
Juicy
Moist
Utilize

Ick Ick Ick.

MFM

PS: I love "awesome" Sad but true.

Shades of Humanity
01-14-2007, 01:36 AM
Meaty
Juicy
Moist


Well, there goes your career in writing erotica :tongue

Maryn
01-14-2007, 02:57 AM
Please smack my hand with a ruler for every use of murmur and nod. But make it a plastic ruler, because I'm kind of a wimp.

Maryn, major wuss

Higgins
01-14-2007, 03:25 AM
Please smack my hand with a ruler for every use of murmur and nod. But make it a plastic ruler, because I'm kind of a wimp.

Maryn, major wuss

Murmuring and nodding....any character that can manage to do that much coordination is going to survive all my books.

PeeDee
01-14-2007, 03:36 AM
"I know," he murmured, nodded, rubbed his tummy and patted his head.

Great character building.

kristie911
01-14-2007, 03:44 AM
I hate the word "mounted"...especially in erotica. It just sounds icky.

kristie911
01-14-2007, 03:45 AM
"I know," he murmured, nodded, rubbed his tummy and patted his head.


You acted this out before posting, didn't you, Pete? Don't lie, I know you did.

arrowqueen
01-14-2007, 03:56 AM
Yes, but he left out the 'got dizzy and fell over' bit.

PeeDee
01-14-2007, 04:02 AM
I hate the word "mounted"...especially in erotica. It just sounds icky.

Could be worse in Westerns, really.

He mounted the ol' girl with stirrups, and then rode til the sun went down.

I rest my case.

Arisa81
01-14-2007, 04:40 AM
Someone else already mentioned "awesome," but I need to say it too. And I am known to use it, more often than I'd like.
The other one, which isn't even a real word, but people us all the time: irregardless. It's regardless. Just regardless.
"Mounted" is just not a pretty word, lol.

Higgins
01-14-2007, 04:52 AM
Someone else already mentioned "awesome," but I need to say it too. And I am known to use it, more often than I'd like.
The other one, which isn't even a real word, but people us all the time: irregardless. It's regardless. Just regardless.
"Mounted" is just not a pretty word, lol.

"Awesome dismount!" Biff nodded and murmurred and patted his tummy.

His own tummy, I think.

Chumplet
01-14-2007, 06:49 AM
I hate it when people say their dog was 'spaded' when she was 'spayed'. Whadjya do, hit the poor creature over the head with a shovel?

jenfreedom
01-14-2007, 08:03 AM
"TOTALLY"

Everywhere I look it's "totally" this and "totally" that. "You can totally do this...exercise / diet / organization activity." I feel so valley girl sending off queries to fit a pub and using totally over and over just so I can fit their style. Ugh.

~ Jennifer

jodiodi
01-14-2007, 09:00 AM
I hate "jive" when people mean "jibe"

Other than that, I agree with the person who brought up the ten-words-for-one, makeupyourowntosoundtrendy, turn-any-noun-into-a-verb tendencies of corporate speak.

Anyone wishing to "synergistically transition" into anything need not apply.

In my paying job, I do tons of 'corporate writing'. I've had to learn all the catch phrases and to top it off, I also worked for the Department of Defense and between my medical-corporate-military careers, I've had to use every form of BS known to man and woman and dog and cat and ...

Tiger
01-14-2007, 09:09 AM
Hey, I do sales and marketing as well as writing... Want to compare shovels? :)

Rolling Thunder
01-14-2007, 09:10 AM
Veggies. If you're five years old, fine. But if you're an adult? Come ON!

Tiger
01-14-2007, 09:22 AM
Gee, nobody's mentioned "wryly..."

Adagio
01-14-2007, 09:24 AM
"Awesome!"

Oh, Gods, do I hate that word. It's been on the banned words list for twenty years, and it still won't die.

If "Awesome!" is used by someone over the age of ten, it sounds even stupider, if that's possible. And if used by a member of the clergy, it's an immediate sign that they're going for your granny's pension, and probably wear a bad hairpiece.

I work with students (university students not high-school) and almost everybody uses ... like awesome, it's like, you know, awesome! And I'm using it in my WIP in one character's speech who is like an awesome student.

"Jar." It jars the reader, it jarred me ...

Willowmound
01-14-2007, 04:07 PM
'Alternate', when you mean 'alternative'.

Because 'alternate' means something else!

Learn it.

MegaData
01-14-2007, 06:43 PM
"Duh!"

Stormshine
01-14-2007, 08:40 PM
To orientate, because it means the same thing as to orient.
"As you know ..."

Shadow_Ferret
01-14-2007, 08:49 PM
impact (as in, this impacts society)
preternatural
emo (as an adjective or insult)
nauseous

But but... it's an urban fantasy! I have to use preternatural!

Roger McMillian
01-14-2007, 09:05 PM
Y'know, Ya know , You-know...


ad infinitum

ad nauseum

Dave.C.Robinson
01-14-2007, 11:44 PM
Most of my peeves are fairly obscure.

I dislike the use of 'jerry-rig' for jury-rig. I wear a Vandyke beard not a 'goatee.' The use of impact as a verb is annoying.

I have more, but those will do for now.

C.bronco
01-15-2007, 12:19 AM
The worst from college essays:

numerous
mellifluous (If I see that one again, I'm going for my shotgun.)

Carrie in PA
01-15-2007, 01:04 AM
Prolly.

THIS IS NOT A WORD. Ah, I feel better now.

tenpenynail
01-15-2007, 10:02 AM
Mine...

Phrases:
"You see what I'm saying?" [No, but I hear it.]
"If you think that, you've got another thing coming!" [It's 'think--think--think]
"Bling-Bling." [needs to go bye-bye]
"Shots rang out!" [I've never heard shots ring--unless it was at a bar]
"My bad." [Your bad what? Use of the language?]
"That's some quality job you did." [without a qualifier 'high' or 'low' what is it?]
"O with out the 'h'--as in O what a pretty dress!" [come on!]
"Stay tuned." [Do TV's even have tuners anymore?]
"Obviously..."
[B]Words:
"Conversate" I has a conversate with Jack. [It's conversation!!!]
"Anywho" Instead of anyone.
"Fer" Instead of For.
"TomKat" and "Brangilena"
"Disrespecting." No, it's not respecting or having no respect for...

Dave.C.Robinson
01-15-2007, 10:32 AM
Oh I forgot:

"Axe" instead of ask.

The all too common misuse of "disrespect."

PeeDee
01-15-2007, 12:17 PM
Prolly.

THIS IS NOT A WORD. Ah, I feel better now.

Oh, well, if we're doing that.....we'll do Pete's List of Things That Have Driven Him Batshit Since High School:

Hella
Prolly
Laterz
whateva
gurrrl
Shizzle. Or anything related to it.
"Like"
When something is "the shit."

It's in order of annoyance. They should all be hanging offenses.

Tiger
01-15-2007, 12:32 PM
I rather like "helluva..."

PeeDee
01-15-2007, 12:33 PM
I rather like "helluva..."

I've used "helluva" a few times in my fiction, and I think I say it out loud sometimes. So I can survive helluva.

Hella is a mortal sin, though.

Kate Thornton
01-15-2007, 10:57 PM
Most of my peeves are fairly obscure.

I dislike the use of 'jerry-rig' for jury-rig.

A lot of people don't understand where phrases came from - "jerry-built" & "jerry-rigged" for example were from German-poorly-built wartime goods. Now German-built goods are known for their precision, but the term "jerry-built" lives on. It's insulting.

Let's kill it.

"Beyond the pale" for beyond the limits of law or decency. The term was often used in cases where the territory or jurisdiction outside the pale was considered hostile.

From Wikipedia:
"The most famous pale was in Ireland (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ireland) in the 14th and 15th centuries, and was known simply as the Pale (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pale), or as the English Pale. This was a region in a radius of twenty miles around Dublin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dublin) which the English (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/England) gradually fortified against incursion from Gaelic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaels) Ireland."

This is an insulting term, too - let's kill it, too.

Kate Thornton
01-15-2007, 10:58 PM
Oh, and awful or aweful and awesome used to mean inspiring awe.

I have no idea what a clergyperson would use to indicate this now.

Azure Skye
01-15-2007, 11:14 PM
I need to add utilize to my list. Ack!

TrainofThought
01-15-2007, 11:33 PM
I could care less. I say it out of habit, but itís incorrect and it drives me nuts when I say or hear it. How can you care less? Less than what?

Tiger
01-15-2007, 11:43 PM
It's supposed to be, "I couldn't care less," no?

Tiger
01-15-2007, 11:45 PM
By the way, has anyone had the nerve to enter the "niggardly" fray?

Kate Thornton
01-15-2007, 11:47 PM
Niggardly is a legit word having nothing to do with the despised "n" word - it means small, scanty or meager and has no etymological relation to a racial epithet.

Writers need to clear this up for politicians.

TrainofThought
01-15-2007, 11:49 PM
It's supposed to be, "I couldn't care less," no?I've heard it with 'could' and 'couldn't'.

Tiger
01-15-2007, 11:54 PM
I've heard it with 'could' and 'couldn't'.

"I couldn't care less" makes sense--"could care less" doesn't.

Tiger
01-16-2007, 12:04 AM
Niggardly is a legit word having nothing to do with the despised "n" word - it means small, scanty or meager and has no etymological relation to a racial epithet.

Writers need to clear this up for politicians.

People get insulted at the word, then get more insulted at any suggestion that they might be ignorant. Result? The death of a perfectly good word.

You should have seen what happened one day at the office when I used the word, puss--meaning, face...

pconsidine
01-16-2007, 12:20 AM
Gee, and I thought I was pedantic. ;)

Though I do have a question:

Unless one is writing a period piece, what exactly is the advantage of using the word "niggardly" over "small," "scanty," or "meager"?

blacbird
01-16-2007, 01:16 AM
"Utililize", and its worse nounification, "utilization".

caw

jsh
01-16-2007, 01:17 AM
This is unrelated, but I hate hearing that someone "needs no introduction". Unfailingly, it's said by someone introducing them.I once saw a comedian introduced that way. The host (or whatever he was called) said, "And now a man who needs no introduction," and then just walked off the stage.


Shizzle
That's a shame, since Snoop Dogg is going to star in the next big Disney pirate movie. His catch phrase is going to be "Shizzle me timbers!"

Kate Thornton
01-16-2007, 01:30 AM
Gee, and I thought I was pedantic. ;)

Though I do have a question:

Unless one is writing a period piece, what exactly is the advantage of using the word "niggardly" over "small," "scanty," or "meager"?

The word also has connotations of stinginess - and is used to describe not only portions, but whomever is doling out the meager portions.

I guess though it has been a perfectly good word for a while, it is not really archaic or just for a period piece. And I don't like some ignorant politician (there is a recent political flap over the word) giving a word a meaning that it never had.

Jadezuki
01-16-2007, 02:19 AM
-

Kate Thornton
01-16-2007, 02:43 AM
"Chunk change" instead of "chump change"

I winced when I saw it.

Tiger
01-16-2007, 02:48 AM
Gee, and I thought I was pedantic. ;)

Though I do have a question:

Unless one is writing a period piece, what exactly is the advantage of using the word "niggardly" over "small," "scanty," or "meager"?

The advantage lies in the idea that word usage would not be held hostage by people who don't know, uh... about what they are talking (well, you said you were pedantic) :).

I had a complaint about a story of mine in which I quoted my subject's advice to teens: "don't be afraid of making an ass of yourself." The "ass," as always in this case, an entire animal, not a single human body part.

I'm still not sure if I should stick to my guns and print the piece.

Sorry, if I've diverted the stream.

Silver King
01-16-2007, 02:49 AM
Another one that deserves mention is when someone's name is followed by and company to represent a group.

I saw several in two newspapers this morning.

Sports: Tom Brady and company visited San Diego...

Politics: President Bush and company face stiff opposition...

Entertainment: Bob Seger and company came to town...

It strikes me as the lamest way possible to describe a collection of individuals.

Tiger
01-16-2007, 02:52 AM
No one's mentioned "irregardless"

Elodie-Caroline
01-16-2007, 02:53 AM
Basically -- I hate hearing that word, it really gets my back up. There are some people who say 'basically; in every single sentence they speak; they must think that the word makes them look intelligent or something?


Ellie

C.bronco
01-16-2007, 02:59 AM
Represent used incorrectly.

yes, this is definitely a nerd fest and I'm in

Tiger
01-16-2007, 03:01 AM
The word also has connotations of stinginess - and is used to describe not only portions, but whomever is doling out the meager portions.

I guess though it has been a perfectly good word for a while, it is not really archaic or just for a period piece. And I don't like some ignorant politician (there is a recent political flap over the word) giving a word a meaning that it never had.

Someone really adventurous could try using the noun form of the word on someone...

pconsidine
01-16-2007, 03:33 AM
I guess though it has been a perfectly good word for a while, it is not really archaic or just for a period piece. And I don't like some ignorant politician (there is a recent political flap over the word) giving a word a meaning that it never had. I'm fully agreed on the matter of politicians poking their noses in where they don't belong. However, as language is a living thing, I think we are best served by acknowledging that words accumulate new connotations, often despite the best efforts of those in the know to save them from ignoble ends.

Of course, now I'm just playing Devil's Advocate. :)

allion
01-16-2007, 03:49 AM
Did we do "strategize" yet?

Put that word in a bag with "utilize" and beat the bag with a hammer.

Karen
(cranky)

MattW
01-16-2007, 07:20 AM
Stratulize?

tenpenynail
01-16-2007, 07:28 AM
SIGNAGE: Went to town today to see my friend's soon to be open new restaurant. She said, "What do you think of my signage?" Your what? Oh come on, can't we just call it a sign? Does using the word 'signage' make the restaurant more posh and upscale? Or was she telling me a new era is upon us--the age of signs? Oh wait, Hair the musical already did a song about that!

Even my spell-checker agrees...

pconsidine
01-16-2007, 08:06 AM
"Signage" is actually advertising industry-speak that leaked out into the real world. It's meant to encompass not only the sign on the front of the building, but all the interior signs, menu boards, and the like. It has a very specific meaning within the industry, but like most words, it's just irritating outside of that industry.

Come to think of it, it's also pretty damn annoying within the industry, but you know no one ever listens to the writers.

jsh
01-16-2007, 05:55 PM
"Signage" is actually advertising industry-speak that leaked out into the real world.
We use it in local government for planning & zoning purposes, and as a rare exception to jaundiced jargon, it's a worthwhile term. I think it's like methodology, however, in the same sense that methodology is often used when method is what's intended.

One word I've been trying to drop is appreciate when speaking of being grateful for assistance, &c. "I appreciate your help with this."

jodiodi
01-16-2007, 06:02 PM
We also use signage in healthcare since compliance surveys often look at our 'signage' in order to assess compliance with life-safety standards.

C.bronco
01-18-2007, 07:25 PM
http://encarta.msn.com/dictionary_1861677188/jollify.html
Why would encarta endorse this as a word? Why oh why?

tenpenynail
01-19-2007, 07:44 PM
I just heard it!

"DRUG DEAL GONE BAD"----always said together!

...as opposed to drug deals gone good? or is "bad" a place you can go to? Oh wait, I thinK I've been there...;)

jsh
01-19-2007, 10:45 PM
"DRUG DEAL GONE BAD"
I'll admit that it does have a certain ring, even if it's cliche.

Kate Thornton
01-19-2007, 11:17 PM
Drug deal gone. Bad.

I think it's a matter of perspective.

ChunkyC
01-19-2007, 11:21 PM
Great thread!

I despise all the new words created for advertizing campaigns. There's a shampoo commercial running on TV up here in Canada with the following phrase:

"...with new micronizing formula!"

WOW! It has make-it-small stuff, it must be good!

I can go them one better though:

"Yes, AW Shampoo gives you a deep multifollicular cleansing!"

Let the stampede to the drugstore begin. :D

tenpenynail
01-20-2007, 03:54 AM
!
Drug deal gone. Bad.

I think it's a matter of perspective.

Agreed. Let's play.

Drug. Deal gone. Bad!
Drug Deal. Gone Bad.
Drug! Deal! Gone--bad...;-( [so sad and all that]

Or we could twist it a bit--change it about...
Drug deals are bad!
Drug deals? My bad.
Drug deal gone! Gooooooooood.
Drug--Deal--gone--bye bye...

Okay, okay, I'm just getting silly now. I'll quit...

PeeDee
01-20-2007, 04:19 AM
"...with new micronizing formula!"


Micronizing?

It makes your hair smaller?

It's like anti-Rogaine......?

Tiger
01-24-2007, 11:11 AM
Just remembered one I saw in a local newspaper once: something about a thief stealing small things from people as "momentos"--yes, as in something one waits uno of :)

Kate Thornton
01-24-2007, 06:35 PM
Just remembered one I saw in a local newspaper once: something about a thief stealing small things from people as "momentos"--yes, as in something one waits uno of :) Oh, yeah! Like in the Thief of Time!

kborsden
01-24-2007, 07:09 PM
"MPs to act on indecent shows"

This was in the paper today, the thought makes me shiver, eugh!!

Kate Thornton
01-24-2007, 07:51 PM
"MPs to act on indecent shows"

This was in the paper today, the thought makes me shiver, eugh!!

Wow - hope it's on BBC America!

Tiger
01-24-2007, 09:59 PM
I don't know... I'd be intrigued enough to take a look

Soccer Mom
01-25-2007, 12:51 AM
I've posted this elsewhere, but sports announcers make me slightly crazy:

That was well defensed. DEFENDED! The word is defended.

He's a real difference-maker. He makes a difference. Gah!

stormie
01-25-2007, 01:16 AM
Indeed. In a novel I'm reading, the author (who is a NY Times bestseller) uses the word "indeed" several times every chapter. If I didn't like the book, I'd throw it across the room. But, indeed, I am a calm person.

Tiger
01-25-2007, 01:22 AM
Are you indeed?

stormie
01-25-2007, 01:30 AM
Indeed I am.

Tiger
01-25-2007, 01:33 AM
In word? Or in deed?

stormie
01-25-2007, 01:39 AM
I am in Word, indeed. (Well, I should be, anyway, instead of posting here!)

Dixie
01-25-2007, 01:56 AM
This thread had definitely given me a few laughs. I suppose I can add a couple to the list of pet-peeve-words.

"You know?" - Appearently I don't know what you know, that I know I should know. I hate it when they interview college football players and they repeat this every other word. College athletes should be required take a course in the English language and correct structure. Im not perfect with it either, but at least I dont repeat myself so much, you know??

"I be bangin'!" - Now this one really pisses me off. Actually, any form of ebonics pisses me off. Sounds like somebody is kicking a trashcan.

"It ruinnt!" - this is severe hillbilly mangling of the English language - to the point I have to listen closely just to translate what is being said in English. I believe the translation is: It is no longer good or viable.

"It went bad" - more hillbilly-ese. As was said earlier, it sounds like bad is a place I dont want to see.

"It done fell out." - Fell out of what? Your mouth? Once it is finished falling, its finished.

"Naw" - I believe the correct word is "No".

"Warsh" - This is one drives me insane. There is no 'R' in wash.

I'll probably think of more later.

Adagio
01-25-2007, 01:57 AM
Indeed. In a novel I'm reading, the author (who is a NY Times bestseller) uses the word "indeed" several times every chapter. If I didn't like the book, I'd throw it across the room. But, indeed, I am a calm person.
Really? Throwing a book across the room for a couple of harmless indeeds? Hm. It makes me think. Ponder. Maybe they were there intentional? For the voice's sake?

kborsden
01-25-2007, 02:09 AM
I hate when that happens.

what the 'f' is that supposed to mean?

jodiodi
01-25-2007, 02:44 AM
Indeed. In a novel I'm reading, the author (who is a NY Times bestseller) uses the word "indeed" several times every chapter. If I didn't like the book, I'd throw it across the room. But, indeed, I am a calm person.

I am so guilty of using 'Indeed'. I think it's the semi-archaic way of speaking my characters have and it just seems to roll off nicely. I've tried to limit myself to maybe one every three chapters, but I'll have to do a wordsearch and replace, I know. :e2bummed:

jodiodi
01-25-2007, 02:49 AM
"It went bad" - more hillbilly-ese. As was said earlier, it sounds like bad is a place I dont want to see.

"It done fell out." - Fell out of what? Your mouth? Once it is finished falling, its finished.

"Warsh" - This is one drives me insane. There is no 'R' in wash.



Well, I gotta say, I've had some milk go bad and maybe some meat went bad before we could cook it. I grew up hearing that phrase and don't think twice about it.

As for 'falling out', I hear that all the time too. In fact we used to use that as shorthand when I was working the floors/ERs as a nurse. EMS would come in and I'd ask, "What's wrong with Ms. Jones?" "DFO". We knew that meant "She done fell out." which meant she just fainted or was found unconscious and the reason wasn't yet known. Again, growing up in GA, I heard and used that a lot.

The warsh--UGH! I can't stand that either and my best friend's mother says that.

Azure Skye
01-25-2007, 03:00 AM
One I just heard on the news: Shots rang out. I don't know why but that makes my ears ache.

Tiger
01-25-2007, 04:12 AM
Do you think that the folks writing the copy for TV previews could never use "the hunter becomes the hunted" ever, ever (ever), again?

stormie
01-25-2007, 05:23 PM
Really? Throwing a book across the room for a couple of harmless indeeds? Hm. It makes me think. Ponder. Maybe they were there intentional? For the voice's sake?
No, they were more than a couple of "indeeds." Too many. And it wasn't for the voice. I'm enjoying the book, except for that. Indeed, that's just my opinion. :D

Vandal
01-25-2007, 06:42 PM
"Going forward" or "moving forward"

I hear this a lot on talk radio, as in "Coach, how do you assess your teams chances, going forward?"

As opposed to going backward?


"... and I'm, like..." or "...so I'm, like..."

Probably the most annoying phrases out there. It's not just for teenagers, anymore. I work with highly educated engineers who can't make it through a conversation without dropping a few of these clunkers.

kborsden
01-28-2007, 10:58 PM
'actually'

I don't know why, it just pisses me off!

Silver King
01-28-2007, 11:26 PM
People who begin sentences with, "For what it's worth..."

To quote kborsden, I don't know why, it just pisses me off!

Adagio
01-29-2007, 01:27 AM
'actually'

I don't know why, it just pisses me off!

Actually, Adagio uses it a lot. She rolls up her eyes. Eventually, she has to give up on one of her favorite words not to piss off kborsden. *grin*

Just kidding!

Dixie
01-29-2007, 06:19 AM
Another one got to me today - 'Nucular'. I believe the word is NUCLEAR.

jodiodi
01-29-2007, 06:16 PM
The president is guilty of that one. I think it may be a midwestern thing as I remember David Letterman commenting on it when he mentions being from Indiana.

stormie
01-29-2007, 06:37 PM
Another one got to me today - 'Nucular'. I believe the word is NUCLEAR.
Yeah, could be a midwestern thing, but Bush is known for his mangled words. Andy Rooney on 60 Minutes last night talked about it, and showed clips of Bush saying "nucular."

Dixie
01-30-2007, 12:28 AM
The strange thing is I heard it that way even before Bush was President. My computer lab teacher from middle school always said it that way - I actually popped off in class and told her the word was NUCLEAR not nucular, there was no second 'u' in nuclear, just one 'u'. I got slapped with a detention over that one - even though I was quite correct.

Silver King
01-30-2007, 12:51 AM
I actually popped off in class
I'm gonna tell kborsden you said that. :tongue

CaroGirl
01-30-2007, 12:57 AM
Expressions like "At the end of the day" and "If I'm being honest". What if you were to not be honest? Just...argh.

stormie
01-30-2007, 03:53 AM
Clearly. "Clearly he saw that it was true." "Clearly, this is such a minor annoyance."

MDavis
01-30-2007, 04:06 AM
I used to get just a little bit enraged (whadaya think, is that possible?) in my college English lit classes every time someone used some variation of "juxtapose" or "dichotomy." The words themselves are fine I guess, but English majors use them as shortcuts to intelligent-sounding analysis.

Drove me up a wall.

Now that I'm in an advertising sales environment, all I hear about is "leveraging"--in a Q&A session, one sales rep used that word six times in one question.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
01-30-2007, 06:17 AM
'Synergy'. I got so bloody tired of 'synergy' in business communications!

kborsden
01-31-2007, 01:32 AM
'pro-active'

It's just a word people use when they don't know what else to say!

Dixie
01-31-2007, 01:43 AM
I'm gonna tell kborsden you said that. :tongue

LOL, g'head make my day. :D

kborsden
01-31-2007, 02:37 AM
I'll let you off this time, but don't do it again because it ACTUALLY really does piss me off.

AncientEagle
01-31-2007, 05:13 AM
A lot of people don't understand where phrases came from - "jerry-built" & "jerry-rigged" for example were from German-poorly-built wartime goods. Now German-built goods are known for their precision, but the term "jerry-built" lives on. It's insulting.

My Webster's says "jury-rig" has been in use since 1788. My American Heritage says "jerry-rig" is an alteration of "jury-rig."

I've never heard that the term had anything to do with "German-poorly-built wartime goods." A few substitute German products were sometimes known as "ersatz," but I don't think the mistaken term of "jerry-rig" has anything to do with the old (primarily WWI) nickname for Germans, "Jerries." While Japanese goods once had the reputation of being poorly made, I don't recall German products ever having that reputation, even in late WWII.

thethinker42
01-31-2007, 05:30 AM
I loathe, despise, and detest the incorrect use of DECIMATED. If your army has been decimated, you damn well better still have 90% of your men left. If your village has been decimated, every 10th house had better be destroyed, and all the rest left intact.

That's the only one I can think of off hand. I know there's more.

thethinker42
01-31-2007, 05:34 AM
I need to say it too. And I am known to use it, more often than I'd like.
The other one, which isn't even a real word, but people us all the time: irregardless. It's regardless. Just regardless.


OMG...That makes my skin crawl, and my co-workers do it ALL THE FREAKING TIME.

I also hate "seen". "I seen Joe the other day." "I seen him do it." No, you buttmunch, you SAW him the other day. You SAW him do it. And I will SAW your legs off if you keep saying it.

Tiger
01-31-2007, 05:34 AM
Oh, good one. With this in mind, I really cannot stand "utterly decimated." Makes even less sense.

thethinker42
01-31-2007, 05:38 AM
Veggies. If you're five years old, fine. But if you're an adult? Come ON!

THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU.

Oh, thought of another one (why do I keep thinking of more while replying to someone else's post?)...odd references to "pregnant". Preggies, Prego, Preggers, etc. BARF. Those sound like a breakfast cereal, a spaghetti sauce, and a parasite, respectively. My husband and his co-workers have a tendency to refer to women as being "about to pop", which for some reason just makes me ill (I'm trying to get pregnant -- the idea of "popping" is not appetizing in the slightest...)

Ok, I'm done coming up with more. I swear.

Tiger
01-31-2007, 05:43 AM
'pro-active'

It's just a word people use when they don't know what else to say!

Well, we'll just proactively transition into a more just and equitable situation, irregardless of its utterly decimated synergy.

thethinker42
01-31-2007, 05:53 AM
Oh, good one. With this in mind, I really cannot stand "utterly decimated." Makes even less sense.

I'm thinking "udderly decimated" could be grounds for a really interesting sci-fi novel...

But, it totally, like, depends on if I can move forward with my current project, which to be honest is taking a lot longer than I thought. BUt I could care less, for what it's worth, because I seen what happens when people, like, rush through stuff like this. You literally end up with a niggardly peace of crap, instead of a piece that is awesome indeed.

*runs and hides...*

AncientEagle
01-31-2007, 08:13 AM
One in print that irks me: "predominately" for "predominantly."

kborsden
01-31-2007, 08:16 AM
'Procrastinate'

possibly the most annoying word in the english language to hear. The sound of it alone makes me want to bust someones chops.

MDavis
01-31-2007, 08:22 AM
THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU.

Oh, thought of another one (why do I keep thinking of more while replying to someone else's post?)...odd references to "pregnant". Preggies, Prego, Preggers, etc. BARF. Those sound like a breakfast cereal, a spaghetti sauce, and a parasite, respectively. My husband and his co-workers have a tendency to refer to women as being "about to pop", which for some reason just makes me ill (I'm trying to get pregnant -- the idea of "popping" is not appetizing in the slightest...)

Ok, I'm done coming up with more. I swear.

My turn to say THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. All those variations (especially preggers) make my skin crawl. Barf is right. :Soapbox:

Tiger
01-31-2007, 09:44 AM
Got something against spaghetti sauce?

Tiger
01-31-2007, 12:05 PM
"Fortuitous" is one that always gets misused. While we're at it, when exactly did "me" get to be such a dirty word?

Well, maybe it's only a dirty word for you and I.

thethinker42
01-31-2007, 10:05 PM
Got something against spaghetti sauce?

Not at all. In fact, Prego is my favorite kind. However, I'd not sooner want to be called "Prego" when pregnant than I'd want to be called "Ragu".

jodiodi
02-01-2007, 02:12 AM
This may be completely off-mark, but I have friends who are all over Tolkien-based fanfiction and I've read/heard/seen characters referred to as:

Leggy for Legolas
Hal for Haldir
'Rho for Elrohir
'Dan for Elladan
Thrannie - for Thranduil
Glor - for Glorfindel

It drives me crazy because their creator gave them names and in the creator's world, the world in which these characters live, their names all mean something and 'nicknames' would never just be little shortened versions of their names. If I ever talk to any of them, I make them specify who they are speaking of by the characters full name. It's the same with other characters from books or movies. They were given names and if they have nicknames the authors/creators would have given them to us.

It's silly, I know, but is like nails on a chalkboard to me.

bardwell
02-02-2007, 06:52 PM
Can I play? The "nucular" complaints reminded me of a couple I hear a lot: liberry for library, and joolery for jewelry. But one that really drives me nuts is the answering of a question followed by "Why?" As in:
"What time is it?"
"Eleven. Why?"

truelyana
02-02-2007, 09:59 PM
'sustainability'

It is absolutetly everywhere, and means nothing!

scarletpeaches
02-02-2007, 10:02 PM
Basically.
At the end of the day.
'Literally' when something being described is NOT and could not be literal. "I literally flew down the stairs." What, you levitate, now?

scarletpeaches
02-02-2007, 10:02 PM
Oh, and 'normalcy'.

It's NORMALITY, people!

stormie
02-02-2007, 10:30 PM
And now that we're in the month of Feberary....

Kate Thornton
02-02-2007, 10:36 PM
Or Feb-you-wary...

I guess I cut folks a lot of slack on pronounciation. Except for that New-kew-ler thing. That one one gets you a poke with a sharp stick.

Dixie
02-03-2007, 04:34 AM
Gawd.

That just sounds awful, like a drunk southern baptist or something.

Silver King
02-03-2007, 04:55 AM
This one got me yesterday, and it has nothing to do with the word, but how it was used.

I was having lunch next to a couple, and when the server brought their meal, the man said, "I didn't order that. I don't DO enchiladas."

Maybe it was the way he said DO, but the word struck me like an ice pick in my ear. Then I started thinking about all the times I've heard DO used this way, and it gave me a headache.

scarletpeaches
02-03-2007, 04:57 AM
What about 'like'?

"I think, like, she should like, wear pink, cuz blue's like, SO not her colour."

I know one person in particular who punctuates every sentence - every breath - with 'like' and it makes me want to rip off her head and shit down her neck.

Judg
02-03-2007, 05:49 AM
*edges carefully away from scarletpeaches*

thethinker42
02-03-2007, 06:07 AM
it makes me want to rip off her head and shit down her neck.

I did that to someone once. It was, like, a total bitch to clean up and stuff. And, like, I hate housework anyway...

Dixie
02-03-2007, 06:27 AM
:roll:

Deadbeat 007
02-05-2007, 04:54 AM
No more 'damits.' It's 'damn it' or 'dammit.'

Dixie
02-05-2007, 06:54 AM
Yonder is one. I have no idea why, but it does make me a little crazy.

Lady Esther
02-05-2007, 07:44 AM
What about 'like'?

"I think, like, she should like, wear pink, cuz blue's like, SO not her colour."

I know one person in particular who punctuates every sentence - every breath - with 'like' and it makes me want to rip off her head and shit down her neck.

:roll:



'Synergy'. I got so bloody tired of 'synergy' in business communications!


I guess you won't be reading my story called The Book of Synergy. LOL.


My sister and I always laugh when commercials use the term "dermatalogically tested" lol. It's irritating but funny.

I also hate "magnanimity". Every time I'm reading, it slows me down.

"Should of"... It's "should HAVE"

"Breh-fiss" for "breakfast". I say "brekfist" but my sister always says "breh-fiss" It's annoying.

"that's what's up" My brother would always annoy me with this, but now I find myself saying it. Erggh.

Lady Esther
02-05-2007, 07:56 AM
"respectively" is funny to me.
(You need to trip over a rock, fall into a ditch, land your neck on a pichfork, and catch your eye on a needle.... respectively.)

JB_Finesse
02-05-2007, 08:18 AM
I see nothing wrong with "febuary". To me, it's like wensday. When you spell it, of course you have to write that extra letter, but do you really pronounce it that way? I sure as hell don't. Vegtables, probly, febuary and wensday just sound right to me. If someone actually pronounced them the way they were spelled I would be creeped out.

I also say awesome a bit too much. I hate nucular, however. And "tha" instead of the. WHAT THE FUCK? IS IT PRONOUNCED ANY DIFFERENTLY? NO? THEN STOP SPELLING IT LIKE THAT YOU ASSWIPE!

At my grandma's funeral, the priest said "roots" with the same double O sound as "book". That really pissed me off for some reason.

Dave.C.Robinson
02-05-2007, 09:59 AM
I can't stand to hear "on accident."

It's "by accident," and "on purpose." It makes me think the speaker has the linguistic ability of a five-year-old.

scarletpeaches
02-05-2007, 04:43 PM
"Forward planning."

So tell me; exactly how would one plan backwards?

Dixie
02-05-2007, 07:55 PM
'Far' when they mean fire.

Tore - when they should say tear.

Don't and no used in the same sentence. This is elementary grammar and yet I see college kids using it.

Lady Esther
02-06-2007, 04:39 AM
"Holla" Urgh. Terrible

scarletpeaches
02-06-2007, 04:45 AM
It's a 'Dundee' thing to say loss instead of lose.

"Look after your purse; you might loss it." GAH!!

Also, in this city people say 'how' when they mean 'how come' or 'why'.

"I wanted to slap her!"
-"How?"
"Uh...by using my hand?"

Come Back Kid
02-07-2007, 08:52 PM
A friend of mine had a "small" legal problem. I asked him how he got out of it.
He said , "I had to fleabargin."

A college professor once said, "there are two words I never want to hear in this class. One is" lousy" and the other is "swell."
A guy in the back of the room said, " Professor, what are the two words?"
Jim

AceTachyon
02-08-2007, 01:42 AM
Anyone mention "return back"?

I heard this over the PA of a store. "Would the owner of a silver Toyota Corolla license plate number (blah blah blah) please return back to your car. You left your lights on."

um...isn't that redundant?

Tiger
02-08-2007, 02:28 AM
Has anyone mentioned "brung" or "brang?" How about "drug" as a past tense of drag?

Azure Skye
02-08-2007, 03:57 AM
I'm not sure if this is a true word but "tornadic" has been used a lot lately when talking about the weather. "There's been a lot of tornadic activity in Oklahoma lately." Real word or not, it just sounds bad.

Adagio
02-08-2007, 04:46 AM
What about 'like'?

I know one person in particular who punctuates every sentence - every breath - with 'like' and it makes me want to rip off her head and shit down her neck.

I work on a campus, and almost every student uses "like," and "you know." Every other darn word is "like." A filler? Automatic speech? Everything is "like."

thethinker42
02-08-2007, 05:05 AM
Has anyone mentioned "brung" or "brang?" How about "drug" as a past tense of drag?

How about "acrossed" or "acrosst"? That, along with "drownding" or "drowned", makes me want to gouge my eyeballs out with a fork.

Dixie
02-08-2007, 09:02 PM
another one is spat. As in me and my wife had another spat.

To me spat sounds like something gooey fell off the counter and landed on the floor.

RTH
02-09-2007, 10:45 PM
I counted the number of "likes" used in a conversation by two girls on the subway ahwile back. I think one of them used it some 47 times between 14th street and 42nd (which is about a 10 minute ride on the local train).

Ugh...

Dave.C.Robinson
02-10-2007, 12:42 AM
How about "ambliance" for ambulance. That makes me cringe.

CheshireCat
02-10-2007, 03:45 AM
"Forward planning."

So tell me; exactly how would one plan backwards?


That would be revisionist history, I believe. ;)

blacbird
02-10-2007, 03:54 AM
"Oftentimes"

caw

Adagio
02-10-2007, 04:51 AM
I counted the number of "likes" used in a conversation by two girls on the subway ahwile back. I think one of them used it some 47 times between 14th street and 42nd (which is about a 10 minute ride on the local train).

Ugh...

Yup. I know that local. And hearing them yakking in cellulars is like ... ugh!
This just reminds me that I shouldn't use "just" so often.

Dixie
02-10-2007, 07:13 AM
How about "ambliance" for ambulance. That makes me cringe.

Dave I have an mp3 file of a woman that broke into an ambulance and got on the radio and was telling the dispatcher they had to move it because she couldn't back out of her driveway to get to work. Not only was she doing something highly illegal and stupid- she was also pronouncing ambulance "amblance" no "U". At the end of the mp3 you hear the medics walking up and pulling her out of the cab and a police officer taking custody of her - after dispatch had told her repeatedly to get off the radio or face charges in court.

LeslieB
02-12-2007, 08:48 AM
My cringe-words are ones where the -ng sound in the middle of words has been changed to just the -n. Strenth for strength, lenth for length, and so on. I had a health teacher in college who pronounced strength as strenth, and I thought I would never make it to the end of the semester without having a screaming fit.

Dixie
02-13-2007, 12:18 AM
Les,
I would have had a screaming fit anyway. I told my career orientation teacher that if she said 'packet' one more time - I would scream. She told me I was pushing it and in the very next sentence, she used 'packet'. I screamed. LOL. I got sent to the principal's office over that one. He ended up laughing and he didn't have the heart to punish me for something he found amusing. I also did a similar thing for my accounting teacher that always prounouced nuclear as 'nucular'. I ended up with a detention.

stormie
02-13-2007, 12:58 AM
After reading the above about the "amblance" I have to say I've heard this one from time to time: Powice (pronounced po-weece) instead of police.

wyntermoon
02-13-2007, 01:28 AM
Powice (pronounced po-weece) instead of police.

ew.

Vandal
02-13-2007, 05:11 PM
Problematic.

I hear the misuse of this one all the time. Instead of "that could be a problem", we get "that could prove to be problematic". Ack.

Stephanie_Gunn
02-13-2007, 05:13 PM
Has anyone mentioned "brung" or "brang?" How about "drug" as a past tense of drag?

"Drug" is one of my all time pet hates. Grrr.

Mae
02-13-2007, 05:34 PM
Years ago I had a manager who constantly used the word "ideal" in place of "idea". Drove me crazy.