PDA

View Full Version : Judgment or judgement



A. Hamilton
01-01-2007, 03:35 AM
Word flagged my spelling of judgement, suggested changing it to judgment. I have always spelled it judgement. The entries at dictionary.com show it both ways. Is there any place where using it one way would be more appropriate? The suggestion from the site is that the British form is judgement. I'm not British, but have only seen it commonly used in that form.
What's the correct use where? Is it a dialect thing?

Adagio
01-01-2007, 04:19 AM
From all I know, it's JUDGMENT. If I write it with an "e" Word gets all red in the face!

Adagio

Silver King
01-01-2007, 04:40 AM
It's one of those words that can go both ways, sort of like my neighbor, who thinks my wife can't tell when he's flirting with me.

veinglory
01-01-2007, 04:45 AM
They are variants. I think judgement was the more commonly used before MSWord spellchecker butted in.

brer
01-01-2007, 05:56 AM
Originally Posted by veinglory

They are variants. I think judgement was the more commonly used before MSWord spellchecker butted in.
Maybe that was true back in the days when us Yanks were merely American Colonists ... But now adays, in our American-USA dictionaries, the spelling is judgment. The other weirdeeeee with the extra eeeee, is a British variant. imo.

askeladd
01-01-2007, 06:39 AM
From what I've read, the difference appears to be an American English vs. British English thing, BE having the extra "e." Wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judgment) suggests, however, that "judgment" is preferred even in Britain when used in legal contexts. I haven't been able to determine which form was "original" and which is derived.

Jamesaritchie
01-01-2007, 06:45 AM
Either spelling is correct in several countries, but "judgment" is more common in America, and "judgement" is more common in the UK.

A. Hamilton
01-01-2007, 07:03 AM
Well thanks for the answers. I'm surprised and wonder when I missed the memo. :D
So, with something like this, I assume an editor wouldn't necessarily frown on it as misspelled, but recommend the more prevalent use?



edited to correct spelling..thanks blacbird

askeladd
01-01-2007, 07:06 AM
Upon further reflection, I recall a spiritual wherein the phrase "judg-a-ment day" is sung, perhaps indicating that "judgement" might be the older spelling. But then again, it could just as well indicate a regional/dialect variation, or the addition of an extra syllable to faciliate singing. Where's a linguist when you need one? :D

Sandi LeFaucheur
01-01-2007, 07:22 AM
The Collins Dictionary (UK) has both spellings. It doesn't indicate that the one without the e is US spelling. I always spell it with an e, and we all know, I'm always right! ;)

Sandi LeFaucheur
01-01-2007, 07:25 AM
Just checked Oxford English Dictionary for Students site. It says:
"use judgement in general contexts, judgment in legal use"

http://www.oup.com/uk/booksites/content/0199296251/essentials/commonspellingerrors/

A. Hamilton
01-01-2007, 07:41 AM
Very helpful Sandi, thank you.

Jamesaritchie
01-01-2007, 08:08 AM
Just checked Oxford English Dictionary for Students site. It says:
"use judgement in general contexts, judgment in legal use"

http://www.oup.com/uk/booksites/content/0199296251/essentials/commonspellingerrors/

I believe that, too, is UK usage. In America, "judgment" is generally used for both general and legal context.

brer
01-01-2007, 08:38 AM
Checked my USA dictionaries. It's judgment in USA.

And checked Patricia T. O'Conner's "Woe Is I, The Grammarphobe's Guide to better English in Plain English." On page 115:

judgment. No e after the g.

Should I return all them and demand a refund?
Even though I'm a yank?

veronie
01-01-2007, 09:09 AM
Judgement if you are writing for the Motherland. Judgment if you are writing for Yanks.

As far as an editor frowning on it, I put "judgement" in a headline during one of my first days as a newspaper copy editor, and my boss (the newspaper editor) definitely frowned upon it. :)

blacbird
01-01-2007, 11:40 AM
Well thanks for the answers. I'm surprised and wonder when I missed the memo. :D
So, with something like this, I assume an editor wouldn't necessarily frown on it as mispelled, but recommend the more prevailant use?

Probably not, but an editor would cringe at the spelling of "prevalent" as "prevailant". I'm one, and I do.

caw

A. Hamilton
01-01-2007, 11:43 AM
Probably not, but an editor would cringe at the spelling of "prevalent" as "prevailant". I'm one, and I do.

caw
oops..corrected!
thanks

brer
01-01-2007, 01:35 PM
Originally posted by P.H.Delarran:

Well thanks for the answers. I'm surprised and wonder when I missed the memo. :D
So, with something like this, I assume an editor wouldn't necessarily frown on it as mispelled, but recommend the more prevalent use?

Hissss, hissss ... Us snakes resent that misspelling of "misspelled." ... hissss, hissss ...

Or is that the way Brits spell it?
And do Brit snakes go: hiesss, hiesss ? (an extra e and one less s ? )

Sandi LeFaucheur
01-01-2007, 06:23 PM
Hissss, hissss ... Us snakes resent that misspelling of "misspelled." ... hissss, hissss ...

Or is that the way Brits spell it?
And do Brit snakes go: hiesss, hiesss ? (an extra e and one less s ? )

Don't you mean "we snakes"? http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/icons/icon12.gif No, Brits put the s in the middle of "misspelled". Mind, we often end it with a t. ("misspelt" that is, not "it". "It" always ends with a t, even in the States. Or so I've been told.)

I was thinking that US spelling looks like something's missing. Then I realised something is missing--half the letters! But after much thought, in the case of "judgement" vs "judgment", it would appear that the latter makes more sense, considering that even in British English, sometimes its spelt one way, and sometimes t'other. Judgment Day doesn't have the e, according to Collins.

So in the case of this word--and this word alone--my judgment is that I shall allow the spelling without the e.

But please put the u in colour.http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/icons/icon7.gif

Jamesaritchie
01-02-2007, 12:39 AM
But please put the u in colour.http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/icons/icon7.gif

Well, I would, but I hate wasting valuable letters for no good reason. Besides, as Mark Twain said, "I never write "metropolis" for seven cents, because I can get the same money for "city."

Along these same lines, I never write "colour" when I can get the same money for "color."

Sandi LeFaucheur
01-02-2007, 01:09 AM
But it looks more finished with the u! :)

Let's agree to differ. I'm English; you're American. You say tomato and I say . . . hmmm, that doesn't work when they're written down.

brer
01-02-2007, 02:53 AM
I, as a young Yank, would often spell it as "behaviour." Part of my problem was I grew up with some "old books."

Vice President of the United States Dan Quayle spelled it as "potatoe." He was probably a wanna-be Brit spy (he couldn't even spell it the Brit way). Maybe he thought he had time-warped to before the 1880s.

Although I'm a Yank, when I play Scrabble and it's my turn, I become a Brit at heart. A "u" is worth a lot of points.
And then I also spell it as "ssnakess."

Jamesaritchie
01-02-2007, 03:41 AM
But it looks more finished with the u! :)

Let's agree to differ. I'm English; you're American. You say tomato and I say . . . hmmm, that doesn't work when they're written down.

UInfortunately, I grew up reading a great many UK writers, so I often slip into the habit of adding extra letters myself. Fortunately, by setting my trusty word processor to check for American spelling, my manuscripts generally don't drive editors completely insane.

Er, maybe it's I say tomato, and you say tomatou. Or toumatou, Or maybe even toumatoue.

Of course, around these parts, most people just call them "maters," which is short for their proper name of "tamater."

Same with the lowly potato. Round here, they're "taters." As in, "How 'bout some fried taters for supper."

Tell me we can't skimp on letters.

Sandi LeFaucheur
01-02-2007, 06:57 AM
Er, maybe it's I say tomato, and you say tomatou. Or toumatou, Or maybe even toumatoue.

How about tomahto?

A. Hamilton
01-02-2007, 07:16 AM
Same with the lowly potato. Round here, they're "taters." As in, "How 'bout some fried taters for supper."


spuds

Silver King
01-02-2007, 07:33 AM
spuds
As my boy would say, "Smashed ones."

And every time, I know what he means.

blacbird
01-02-2007, 11:21 AM
Vice President of the United States Dan Quayle spelled it as "potatoe." He was probably a wanna-be Brit spy

No. He was just an idiot. Thank God George H. W. Bush didn't die in office.

caw