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readjdm
12-27-2006, 07:04 PM
What's the best way to earn a living when you're still not earning multimillion dollar book deals? I've come to the conclusion I'll never be happy with a desk job. When I'm at a desk, my mind just naturally thinks, "Well, I'm here... shouldn't I be writing?" I'm just curious what other writers do to pay the bills while pursuing the dream.

alleycat
12-27-2006, 07:30 PM
Become a nighttime security guard in an office building. If you can stay awake you'll have plenty of time to write.

Not that I've ever done it . . .

readjdm
12-27-2006, 07:32 PM
Become a nighttime security guard in an office building. If you can stay awake you'll have plenty of time to write.

Not that I've ever done it . . .

That's a good one. I like that.

Plus, I would likely get some kind of weapon.

Del
12-27-2006, 07:34 PM
Landscaping. Get your hands dirty and breathe the air. Then you can go home and write because you haven't exhausted your brain looking for that $1.25 that isn't where it ought to be in the company ledgers.

TrainofThought
12-27-2006, 07:35 PM
The job that pays my bills and then some is “LAN Administrator”. Now ask if I'm happy, no, but we do what we do to achieve other things. I’m waiting for George Clooney to realize he can’t spend another day without me requesting I quit my job and move to his Italian villa.

readjdm
12-27-2006, 07:36 PM
Landscaping. Get your hands dirty and breathe the air. Then you can go home and write because you haven't exhausted your brain looking for that $1.25 that isn't where it ought to be in the company ledgers.

This is exactly what I mean. A job where I can preserve brain power for when it really counts.

Of course, does landscaping pay the bills...? I guess I wouldn't know. I've never worked in landscaping...

FergieC
12-27-2006, 07:43 PM
Night time security work is ace for writing. Plenty of time, and you have to stay alert and always be watching and listening. It's knackering though, and you can never go out drinking in the evenings, and it doesn't pay nearly as much as a desk job. I'm still looking for the perfect way to combine writing with earning money.

janetbellinger
12-27-2006, 07:50 PM
I have two part time day jobs - substitute teacher and ESL tutor. The ESL tutoring has been the most rewarding jobs I have ever had, for I feel a sense of accomplishment,as though I am needed, something lacking when I work as a substitute teacher and which I have yet to experience as a writer. So, the universe does provide, even when it isn't in your chosen calling. Both these part time jobs give me the flexibility to work on my writing. It is up to me how much I work - of course, finances play a big part in determining how many days I choose to work.

engmajor2005
12-27-2006, 07:53 PM
I hate the fact that I have to work, quite honestly. I didn't major in business nor did I major in education; hence, I don't want to "work." I want to write. I should be able to write.

Meanwhile, I have a desk job where I'm underpaid.

ChaosTitan
12-27-2006, 08:24 PM
Retail management, while highly stressful and exhausting this time of year, leaves me craving some sort of mental release when I come home at night. I always have time during the day to think about my stories; I scribble notes in a mini notebook that stays in my apron pocket; I get to observe human behavior on a daily basis.

It's not great pay, but I can live on it. Without my writing as my therapy, I would have had a nervous breakdown by now.

Del
12-27-2006, 08:27 PM
Night time security work is ace for writing. Plenty of time, and you have to stay alert and always be watching and listening. It's knackering though, and you can never go out drinking in the evenings, and it doesn't pay nearly as much as a desk job. I'm still looking for the perfect way to combine writing with earning money.

I was a professional driver. I was behind the wheel 10 to 15 hours a day. I kept a tape recorder and talked my story.

WackAMole
12-27-2006, 08:34 PM
I sit at a desk..Hospice Business Coordinator. I used to be overworked. They took some of the load off which was a real relief, but then the census dropped and we started losing money and nurses. So now its kinda boring at times, but picking up.

I write when I can. I realize the day may never come when I can make a living doing this, but I write on breaks, during my lunch and after my kids go to bed. Its kind of a reward to myself for getting through another day.

Del
12-27-2006, 08:37 PM
Retail management, while highly stressful and exhausting this time of year, leaves me craving some sort of mental release when I come home at night. I always have time during the day to think about my stories; I scribble notes in a mini notebook that stays in my apron pocket; I get to observe human behavior on a daily basis.

It's not great pay, but I can live on it. Without my writing as my therapy, I would have had a nervous breakdown by now.

Eww. Retail. I hated management. Bigger checks but more hours and stress. I was better off on the floor.

I did have a retail job in a hardware store. I loved it! I became quite popular solving problems for the customers - above and beyond...

I recall helping a guy design his entire car port. :D

Eight hours, low stress, appreciation, lunch break. But it was before I tried serious writing.

William Haskins
12-27-2006, 09:01 PM
What's the best way to earn a living when you're still not earning multimillion dollar book deals?

people haven't been actually telling you this is going to happen for you, have they?

ChaosTitan
12-27-2006, 09:12 PM
I was better off on the floor.


Very often they have to scrape me up off the floor. We keep a shovel handy for that.... :e2hammer:

readjdm
12-27-2006, 09:13 PM
people haven't been actually telling you this is going to happen for you, have they?

No, Debbie Downer. It's called hyperbole.

William Haskins
12-27-2006, 09:22 PM
indeed.

what i've found in many years of working as a writer is that the same frustrations persist. only instead of wishing one could be writing while occupied with earning a living, one simply finds that one is writing for hire and wishes one could be working on one's "own" stuff.

to the degree that one must earn a living, writing will always be a labor of love, conducted in stolen moments and carved-out hours when one is tired or could/should be doing other things. it's up to the individual to decide if that sacrifice is worth it.

best wishes on your pursuit.

Siddow
12-27-2006, 09:43 PM
Bartend.
You can make up stories behind the bar, and you get to meet all kinds of characters and hear their stories. In the right spot, pay is pretty good--my last gig, I brought home 40k a year, and only worked four nights a week.
Plus, free booze.

janetbellinger
12-27-2006, 09:46 PM
Well yeah, I like to write, too and wish I didn't have to work. But I prefer to see the best in situations. I'm just saying, if you have to work at another job along with writing, what I do isn't bad.


I hate the fact that I have to work, quite honestly. I didn't major in business nor did I major in education; hence, I don't want to "work." I want to write. I should be able to write.

Meanwhile, I have a desk job where I'm underpaid.

Norman D Gutter
12-27-2006, 10:10 PM
As an alternative, I have learned to use my day job to writing advantage. As an engineer who can write well (for some reason the two don't seem to come together in one body very often), I have had more than my share of the writing workload over my 32 year career. Since I got the bug to write creatively--about 6 years ago--I have tried to hone my writing skills in my business writing. I try to eliminate passive voice from my business letters, cut adjectives/adverbs from construction specifications, look for better, more descriptive words in technical reports, etc. And I try to make every e-mail in perfect English just as if I were printing and putting it in an envelope. I figure all of this will serve me well as I try to write my way into a creative writing career. But, if it doesn't work, retirement is now only 10 years and 4 days away.

NDG

Del
12-27-2006, 10:16 PM
But, if it doesn't work, retirement is now only 10 years and 4 days away.

NDG

Happy birthday.

PeeDee
12-28-2006, 04:48 AM
I work in a used bookstore (I'm there right now, actually). it means that I putter around, deal with books, drink tea, answer things on AW, and have ideas pop into my head. If they're worth it, I right them down, or I just stew on them.

Mostly, even when I have the downtime for it, I don't do any writing here. I just think and stew and think some more. It's the job equivalent of the long walk you take when you're thinking about your work.

Oddly enough, I was just thinking about night security guard the other day, wondering what you have to do to get into that.

(Probably have muscle mass and an attention span that can keep track of a cup of tea, for starters.)

engmajor2005
12-28-2006, 09:43 PM
Yeah, what do you need for night security guard?

tourdeforce
12-28-2006, 10:04 PM
Yeah, what do you need for night security guard?


A pulse.

You need almost no experience or qualifications to be an unarmed security guard.

PeeDee
12-28-2006, 10:19 PM
I'm nocturnal anyway, that wouldn't be a bad job. Unless it's at the Natural History Museum in New York, as seen in Night At the Museum which you should all go see, because it was a magnificant movie, and I hadn't realized that Mickey Rooney was even still alive......

readjdm
12-28-2006, 10:55 PM
Mostly, even when I have the downtime for it, I don't do any writing here. I just think and stew and think some more. It's the job equivalent of the long walk you take when you're thinking about your work.
I like what you're saying. I don't know if I could look at my own job that way. I don't do anything that makes sense to me for a living. I work a nondescript desk job. Before this nondescript desk job, I worked another nondescript desk job. I also worked two other nondescript desk jobs before that.

I never try to write when I'm at the grocery store. I never try to write when I'm filling my car with gasoline. I might think about writing while I'm doing these things, but I never try to write while I'm doing them. My hands are preoccupied.

My hands aren't preoccupied when I'm sitting at a desk. I need a job that feels like shopping for groceries or filling my car with gasoline.

Unfortunately, neither of these activities would help me pay off the mortgage on a house.

PeeDee
12-28-2006, 11:11 PM
Of course, then there's the other problem. I've had many day jobs (many of them in retail, god knows why) where it can be quite a lot of physical labor. The problem is, your brain turns off and you wind up with no pressing desire to turn it back on when you get home.

I've had periods where even on days off, I haven't written a word, because my brain was off for three working days, it's going to be off for three more working days, so why should it turn on for this one day off when I could get some writing done? It's not intentional, but it happens anyway.

Day jobs are interesting things, especially when you're using them more or less to pass the time and pay bills while you focus on your writing.

readjdm
12-28-2006, 11:53 PM
I've had periods where even on days off, I haven't written a word, because my brain was off for three working days, it's going to be off for three more working days, so why should it turn on for this one day off when I could get some writing done? It's not intentional, but it happens anyway.

This happens to me all the time. It's stage fright. Once you realize you have only a small amount of time to write, you start to put that time on a pedestal. You expect yourself to do big things once the time comes. But then it comes and you realize there's no way you could possibly live up to what you've been expecting. So you go all or nothing. If you can't make the most of your spare time, you'd rather make nothing of it. You can't focus. Can't use your time productively. You just sit there, squirming in your chair, till you walk away from the time you've set aside -- sad, angry, depressed. When will you get your act together? When will you stop dreaming and start writing -- start doing the one thing you were put on this planet to do? Somewhere along the way you stopped believing writing was fun, stopped believing it was something that happened. You started believing you had to make it happen. You lacked discipline, courage, talent, faith. You learned to spend your time on writing-related message boards, talking about writing, sharing stories of failure with other failing writers. You became the tragic figure in your own life story -- a story you couldn't write, could only live. Maybe there's next time. The next life. Maybe in the next life you will have time to become a writer, to write stories, to help fellow human beings understand what the hell they are doing here, what it means to be human, what it means to pass or fail, and feel. Maybe you will use that time wisely. Or maybe you won't. Maybe you will expect too much of yourself in your next life. And maybe the cycle will continue.

It's stage fright. Happens all the time.

PeeDee
12-28-2006, 11:58 PM
Nah. I write just fine under pressure and deadlines, limited time or no. It's just exhaustion and being mildly catatonic for me. I always suspect that there are people who get crummy jobs, aspire for nothing more, go catatonic, and some day die. Terrifying thought.

ShapeSphere
12-29-2006, 07:53 PM
I work as an ESL teacher. The only good thing about this job is that I can use it to live and work in almost any country. The job is a paycheck, not a passion. I've been doing it over five years - the first two were fun. Now in each lesson I plaster on a fake smile, stay sober and don't try and sleep with the female students.

Funnily enough, a lot of writers are/were teachers/professors. I suppose being involved in the teaching of English helps in the writing of English. Maybe.

The job is very tiring and some days I am just too exhausted to write. A better day job would be an easy office job with a computer.

Getting Japanese students to speak is difficult. They are quiet and I often get no replies when asking questions. A bit like when I write to editors.

PeeDee
12-29-2006, 08:17 PM
The job is very tiring and some days I am just too exhausted to write. A better day job would be an easy office job with a computer.

The ironic thing is, I know writers all the way down who say something similar. It may still be true, it just strikes me as funny.

Teachers who want desk jobs, desk jobs who want to be in retail, retail who want to be cashiers, cashiers who want to work in food, food who want to have paper routes (!?).........It goes 'round and round. They're all sure if they had one other sort of job, they would totally be penning their masterpiece. Sometimes, it's true.

Mostly, jobs are exhausting. If it's not a passion, then it's just a job, and it's taxing on your brain.

Writing may be sheer fun and delight, but if you can't get your brain up to speed long enough to do it, then all you are is exhausted and taxed all the time. (Which is terrifying.)

I always suggest that people find a job that they can survive (and maybe enjoy, even a little) that isn't too strenuous. If you want a book-related job, go to a little bookstore, or a public library. If you just want some peace and quiet (or, hah, piece and quiet) then go become a night security guard, or a graveyard watcher.

Or you can do what I do and work a job for long enough to get bored of it and leave, until you finally have the good sense to settle somewhere useful (little bookstore).

ShapeSphere
12-30-2006, 05:15 AM
The ironic thing is, I know writers all the way down who say something similar. It may still be true, it just strikes me as funny.

Teachers who want desk jobs... ...

Yes, maybe you're right and perhaps we are all doing the old "the grass is greener on the other side" routine, but I did work in computing for thirteen years before teaching. That was okay for a while and the hours were usually better. It was also definitely less mentally demanding than teaching. The use of a computer during the day helped to quickly check forums or email.

Anyway, once I am more settled in Japan, will go freelance, do less hours and more writing. Same as I did in my previous location. That worked well enough.

PeeDee
12-30-2006, 05:21 AM
I was just musing, I wasn't having a go at you or anything. By all means, go freelance! It's exilerating. Sort of. In a weird "Gee, I wonder if I will eat this week" sort of way. :)

ShapeSphere
12-30-2006, 05:57 AM
I was just musing, I wasn't having a go at you or anything. By all means, go freelance! It's exilerating. Sort of. In a weird "Gee, I wonder if I will eat this week" sort of way. :)

:D No worries. I knew that.

jenfreedom
12-30-2006, 10:48 AM
I think if you really want to write you could try quitting all lame day jobs and just write. Granted this (like everything else) won't work for everyone but it's worth a shot. If a regular job burns out your writing brain too much I'd quit. There's lots of ways to write for money FT. I'd like to make all my money from magazine work and maybe one day a book or two but for now I supplement with copy work and resumes -- that kind of thing.

That said I used to have a PT day job to get me and my brain out of the house and away from the computer for a while. My job was at a wholesale flower shop. The money was nothing but the break from writing was good for me at the time - plus BONUS all the free flowers I wanted! I actually would have worked for the flowers alone. I think I brought home over 2000.00 worth of free roses, snaps, and gerbs in two months. Find a day job with a perk like that because then it makes the day job worth it.

Take care
~ Jennifer

PeeDee
12-30-2006, 05:51 PM
If the box of used books sitting in the corner of my doorway is any indication, I agree. A fun job with perks is worth it.

johnzakour
12-30-2006, 06:02 PM
I've said it once, and I'll say it again:

If you want to be a full time writer it really helps (a real lot) to have a spouse / significant other / sugar daddy / sugar mommy, who has a good job and a lot of patience.

anavicenteferreira
12-30-2006, 06:15 PM
Whatever you do: don't go into teaching. It's just too taxing, emotionally and mentally. I always had a really hard time writing when I was teaching. I'd get home and feel like someone had been sucking my brain out.

PeeDee
12-30-2006, 06:42 PM
I've said it once, and I'll say it again:

If you want to be a full time writer it really helps (a real lot) to have a spouse / significant other / sugar daddy / sugar mommy, who has a good job and a lot of patience.

I agree. God bless myne wyfe.

tourdeforce
12-30-2006, 06:52 PM
I think if you really want to write you could try quitting all lame day jobs and just write.


This is not practical advice for a new writer who is not supported by someone else.

Del
12-31-2006, 02:58 AM
This is not practical advice for a new writer who is not supported by someone else.

I think suffering can help build a writer's skill. Starvation and exposure should fall under that. :D

PeeDee
12-31-2006, 06:38 AM
I think suffering can help build a writer's skill. Starvation and exposure should fall under that. :D

Not if you have a family, though. It's not fair for them to suffer for your dream. not to that extent.

johnzakour
12-31-2006, 07:58 AM
It's not like on TV where new writers get these huge 6 figure advances and all sorts of perks. (It may happen but it's way rare.)

The vast majority of new writers don't make enough to support themselves no less a family.

Starvation and exposure make you more desperate, not more skilled or talented.

After 7 years I'm finally at the stage where the money is getting real and hoprefully it will continue to grow. But I'm with PeeDee god bless my wife for hanging in there and supporting me for so long or I wouldn't be nearly where I am today.

(BTW, after all this time I still consider myself a novice.)

PeeDee
12-31-2006, 08:01 AM
I'm a novice 'till I'm dead. I'm just getting a little more creative as I go.

truelyana
12-31-2006, 08:04 AM
What about a position in the catering industry like, a food service assistant or a chef...

jenfreedom
12-31-2006, 11:37 AM
This is not practical advice for a new writer who is not supported by someone else.

My advice may seem unpractical but that's why I suggested all kinds of writing not just your one most loved type of writing. There are all kinds of ways to make money writing and most kinds of writing help you polish your skills. Taking a chance is not the death of anyone -- you always have the option of going back and getting a day job. But there is tons of copy/web/business writing work out there to be had and in my experience writing, even writing that's not your first choice of writing leads to more writing and less brain burn out than another sort of day job.

Plus also in my experience, just writing for income leads me to be more diligent and work harder pushing myself to make it because that's all I've got. And I don't have a hubby with some great job and I have a small son to think of -- I just write but I do have to work really hard most of the time. And hope that checks come in a somewhat timely manner.

Take care
~ Jennifer

MyFirstMystery
01-01-2007, 07:17 AM
A pulse.

You need almost no experience or qualifications to be an unarmed security guard.

Most of the security guards I see these days are either very overweight or elderly. I get the impression the physical demands are not intense. Probably more about reporting suspicious activity than doing anything about it.

MFM

verbie
01-01-2007, 08:37 AM
Well, you can always drive a big rig. Get to see the country, make a ton of money, and plenty of time to think while the endless miles just keep clicking away.

Of course, if you want any kind of normalcy in your life, forget it.

Del
01-03-2007, 01:22 AM
While I was writing my book I went through 4 jobs. I was attempting to start a business relating to the last job when I was stricken with disabillity. Social security doesn't pay much but I did finish the book without starving. Now If I can just learn how to sell it.

If I could find someone to do the knife work I could resume my efforts at the buisness but most people don't work on a promise.

FergieC
01-03-2007, 06:48 PM
Night time security work is the easiest job in the world to get into as it's low paid and no one wants to do it. I got in despite having no experience, not being a national of the country, and being quite a small, weakish girl who would clearly just have run away if anything bad happened.

I have to say, office jobs are really what kill my brain off. I sit all day at a desk, in front of a computer, and don't want to do it when I get home. It's a new year though, so time for a change.

Dunno what to do next though - it's way too cold for night time security at the moment. Bar work sounds good.

brunoshouse
01-04-2007, 03:22 PM
I work in a small office product store. It is heaven to be around all of the writerly tools all day, but my customers are so needy, by the end of the day I don't want to talk to another soul.

You can't imagine how many "Authors" (self-proclaimed) I have met. Some of my coworkers make fun of them and I think to myself. Am I that foolish?

Of course not!

Del
01-05-2007, 12:14 AM
You can't imagine how many "Authors" (self-proclaimed) I have met. Some of my coworkers make fun of them and I think to myself. Am I that foolish?

Of course not!

I think it is like the question, am I crazy? So long as you can ask you are likely not as bad off as you think.

PeeDee
01-05-2007, 12:16 AM
I work in a small office product store. It is heaven to be around all of the writerly tools all day, but my customers are so needy, by the end of the day I don't want to talk to another soul.

You can't imagine how many "Authors" (self-proclaimed) I have met. Some of my coworkers make fun of them and I think to myself. Am I that foolish?

Of course not!

I get a lot of that in my bookstore. All sorts of idiot people coming in who casually point out that they're "Authors" and then they offer me their opinions.

I never tell them I'm a writer (a WRITER, damn it, I'm not fancy enough to be an Author). I just nod, smile, and remember that this is why I am as nice and polite to people as I can be, whether I'm a writer or not.

Del
01-05-2007, 03:10 AM
I know you are probably holding the budget together with Silly Putty and Glitter Glue but I envy your position. I'd love to work in a small book store.

I'd like it to be dark, with wooden fixtures and slatted floor. A tall ceiling accommodates a spiral staircase and a loft that completely encircles the store. Dusty books show what isn't selling. A pedestal like counter in the middle has a cash drawer built in and the surface holds an restored antique analog telephone. Beneath the front mullioned window is a table with two dowel back chairs and a coffee pot.

(sigh) I remember stores like that.

nighttimer
01-06-2007, 03:19 PM
If you think it's hard finding your muse when you're working a wage slave job, try unemployment. Plenty of time to write then. Only problem is somebody better be bringing home the bacon because the electric company doesn't care about you writing The Great American Novel sitting in the dark and cold.

I work nights on weekends with three days off during the week. The first day I'm more dead than alive. The second and third I come back to life. I put the writing on the back burner because it seemed more important to get a job and make a contribution to the family than following my bliss.

While I'm recharging my batteries (and paying off late bills) I'm taking on the task of editing a friend's novel. I'm hopeful it will help kick start my own writing.

PeeDee
01-06-2007, 06:27 PM
I know you are probably holding the budget together with Silly Putty and Glitter Glue but I envy your position. I'd love to work in a small book store.

I'd like it to be dark, with wooden fixtures and slatted floor. A tall ceiling accommodates a spiral staircase and a loft that completely encircles the store. Dusty books show what isn't selling. A pedestal like counter in the middle has a cash drawer built in and the surface holds an restored antique analog telephone. Beneath the front mullioned window is a table with two dowel back chairs and a coffee pot.

(sigh) I remember stores like that.

Hah. You just described our downtown store to the letter. It's exactly like that. The wood floorboards even creak when you walk on them. Whole place smells like wood and old books. We have this beautiful old Royal typewriter in the place too, but I'm not allowed to steal it and take it home with me.

The cash-register is a big iron-wrought antique too.

brunoshouse
01-07-2007, 03:10 PM
That pretty much describes my office product store too. We are a small ma & pa operation. Our customers love it. You can't try out a pen at walmart before you buy it. People literally spend hours strolling the aisles. It's amazing how many people have office product fetishes. I thought I was the only one.
We have an old Royal manual t/w in our store window. I love it!

J.S Greer
01-07-2007, 03:21 PM
What's the best way to earn a living when you're still not earning multimillion dollar book deals?

I don't want to sell anything bought or processed, or buy anything sold or processed, or process anything sold, bought, or processed, or repair anything sold, bought, or processed. You know, as a career, I don't want to do that. :tongue

Shara
01-07-2007, 05:08 PM
There are some interesting points on this thread, and I thought I would add my own views.

The concept of being able to make a living writing is what most of us who write aspire to achieve. The reality, as I see it after 37 years of living on this planet, is that only a small minority manage of achieve it.

When I was at school and people asked me what I wanted to do when I grew up, I always said, "a writer". From most people that would prompt the response, "yes, but what about the real job?" My parents, bless them, were always quite supportive, but ultimately I did realise that the 'killjoys' had a point.

My writing group has several guest speakers a year, which have included some very successful novelists. Even they have told us, "don't give up the day job." I spent a long time in the early stages of my working life job-hopping, in an attempt to find a job that would allow me to earn a living using my creativity. Ultimately I fell into a secretarial career by accident, but found this was something that I was quite good at.

Now I have reconciled myself to not having a creative job, but I have a job that pays reasonably well, that I seem to be quite good at, and I am able to live the rather comfortable lifestyle I have got accustomed to living. It is also a job I can leave at work, so once I leave the office, on the whole my time is my own. I do my best to fit the writing into the time I am not at work. I might have more time if I were to write full-time, but I wouldn't be any happier. If we just had my husband's salary to live off, we wouldn't starve, but there would not be quite so many foreign holidays or other luxuries, and to be quite frank I'm not prepared to make such sacrifices.

I am full of admiration for people who have the conviction to pursue writing full-time, but I know it's not the way to go for me. Ultimately we all have to find our own path. It's not enough just to exist, we have to be able to live, but each of us has to decide ourselves what this means to us.

Of course, if I were to sell a novel that became a best-seller then that would be a different story, and there's still some small optimistic part of me that's hoping that one day that might still happen....

Shara

ebrillblaiddes
01-08-2007, 02:57 AM
Whatever you do: don't go into teaching. It's just too taxing, emotionally and mentally. I always had a really hard time writing when I was teaching. I'd get home and feel like someone had been sucking my brain out. Really? I'm having the exact opposite experience--it wasn't until after I started my student teaching placement (with an insane courseload, and I still don't know why I only got one credit for all day two days a week) that my brain's been able to crawl out of the Slimy Pit of Oblivion that's been giving me writer's block since junior year (I'm a grad student now; do the math).

I can even write on weekday evenings, if I manage to drag myself to the gym between school and home, and if I don't have to frantically prepare stuff that night. Although I'll probably never be able to do NaNoWriMo.

BlueTexas
01-08-2007, 05:49 AM
I second whoever said bartending. Best job for writing fodder, ever.

Soccer Mom
01-09-2007, 12:48 AM
I work two jobs to pay bills. They both provide lots of grist for the mill: Lawyer and choir director. (Yes, I know. Those two things go together like a pig and a bicycle. :D)

Maybe someday the writing could pay off. Or I could just have fun and earn enough to pay for the paper and postage stamps I use.