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Mandy-Jane
12-15-2006, 03:10 PM
Does anybody know the correct term for those hats that Chefs wear? Or are they just called Chef's hats?

Thanks....

alleycat
12-15-2006, 03:14 PM
Even if there was a special industry term, I think I would still use chef's hat in any kind of story. Chef's hat is the only thing I've heard them called.

poetinahat
12-15-2006, 03:18 PM
Your best bet at AW is probably WerenCole.

I seem to remember hearing them called toques, though.


http://www.la-toque-du-chef.com/images/logo_bg_blanc_grd.gif

Mandy-Jane
12-15-2006, 03:28 PM
I seem to remember hearing them called toques, though.



http://www.la-toque-du-chef.com/images/logo_bg_blanc_grd.gif



That's amazing! I've just looked up toques. How on earth did you know that? I've never heard the word. I think now I'll put it in my play, and people will think I'm very clever indeed.

Thanks!

poetinahat
12-15-2006, 03:41 PM
Hey, with a name like mine, I'd better know *something* about hats!

(It might've been from reading Anthony Bourdain's Kitchen Confidential -- an enjoyable book.)

rtilryarms
12-15-2006, 06:05 PM
You should hear some of the other words PiaH knows.

Maryn
12-16-2006, 02:44 AM
You can buy a toque at many kitchen stores in shopping malls, starting under ten dollars.

Maryn, whose son was the Pillsbury Dough Boy one Halloween

Sandi LeFaucheur
12-16-2006, 06:14 AM
Ha! And I thought a toque was just a woolly hat beloved of Canadians. Just goes to show. I'm not sure I'd refer to a chef's hat as a toque. I'd keep thinking of that bloke in the Monkees--Mike Nesmith.

C.bronco
12-16-2006, 06:35 AM
I'll ask my sister. She's a chef.

Maryn
12-16-2006, 06:20 PM
Ha! And I thought a toque was just a woolly hat beloved of Canadians. Just goes to show. I'm not sure I'd refer to a chef's hat as a toque. I'd keep thinking of that bloke in the Monkees--Mike Nesmith.Michael Nesmith of the Monkees (yes, the guy whose mother invented Wite-Out) wore what most people call a watch cap, which is apparently similar to the tuque in Canada. The term seems to have crossed the border south as toque (although I live in cold country where I can see Canada on a clear day, and I've never heard it).

The difference between a tuque/toque and a watch cap seems to be that the tuque/toque is worn so the top is not stretched over or flush with the head but sticks out or up--kind of like a chef's toque. I think I'm seeing connections here.

To make sure your reader doesn't envision a knit cap, you could refer to a chef's toque one time, a tall white toque another, a character's pleated white toque another. Your reader will learn.

Maryn, trainable reader