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View Full Version : He dogged (?) the wheel to the left



DeadlyAccurate
12-12-2006, 09:44 PM
I can't think of the word I want here, and dictionary.com is having problems. Around here, we would use that sentence just as I mentioned in the title, but I don't think that's the proper word I'm looking for.

I'm trying to indicate that my MC jerks the wheel sharply to avoid an oncoming car.

WildScribe
12-12-2006, 09:46 PM
Well there goes my suggestion of using the word: jerked. How about wrenched>

DeadlyAccurate
12-12-2006, 09:57 PM
That worked. Thanks!

blacbird
12-12-2006, 11:53 PM
Never heard "dogged" used in that context. "Tugged" might work.

caw

Jamesaritchie
12-13-2006, 01:51 AM
Where I come from, if someone dogged the wheel to the left, it would mean he tied the wheel in a left turn. "Dogged" is term used on the ocean around here, and to "dog" something is to tie it in a set position so it can't move. A ship's wheel used to be "dogged" so the ship would stay on a set course while other business was attended to.

scrivener
12-13-2006, 02:20 AM
"He hauled the wheel to the left..." gives it a muscular, more masculine feel. Now what happens?


Of course a Texan would bulldog that wheel! I know from experience.

DeadlyAccurate
12-14-2006, 08:13 AM
I really don't know where it came from. It may have been some sort of mispronunciation that sort of became the norm, at least in my or my husband's family. Maybe we always meant "jog." ::shrug::

johnnysannie
12-16-2006, 04:17 PM
No, no, I don't think it's a mispronounciation or something. I think it's a colloquial term used in Texas and Lousiana. My husband's family is from Lousiaina and they use "dog it" that way; I have a few little Texas roots and I'm familiar with the term....also "dogging it in", meaning hammering it to get someplace.

Jamesaritchie
12-16-2006, 06:35 PM
I probably should have been a bit more detailed in my post. "Dog" is not a mispronunciation, or a regionalism. It's the actual name of a piece of equipment. Once upon a time, wheels were tied into position, Shortly thereafter, however, ship's wheels have had a hinged catch that fits into a ratchet to hold the wheel in place.

This hinged catch is actually called a "Dog." This is its actual name.

Ship's wheels are turned only when the pilot needs to change course, or needs to maneuver around something. Contrary to what you see in some movies, there is no need for a pilot to stand there and maintain a course. You turn to the heading you want, and you then engage the dog into the ratchet.

So "dogging the wheel" is a proper term. It means turning the wheel to a certain heading, and then engaging the dog to keep it there.

I don't believe turning a car wheel by hand would qualify as "dogging the wheel," and it would throw me a little to read it, but I suppose it would ultimately be the writer's decision.

Popeyesays
12-17-2006, 09:24 PM
"Dogging" is usually used in reference to a hatch or waterproof bulkhead door and means to lock it shut.

You might consider one of those anti-theft steering wheel devices a "dog", but engaging it while driving would probably get one killed.

Regards,
Scott

Jamesaritchie
12-18-2006, 04:56 PM
"Dogging" is usually used in reference to a hatch or waterproof bulkhead door and means to lock it shut.

You might consider one of those anti-theft steering wheel devices a "dog", but engaging it while driving would probably get one killed.

Regards,
Scott

Yep, fastening anything down is often called "dogging" it. But it all started with the ship's wheel, and that little hinged catch called a "dog.".

I don't believe turning something could be called "dogging" it, but I suppose it depends on what the reader will or won't understand.

DeadlyAccurate
12-18-2006, 08:48 PM
I think this one may be a colloquialism too rare outside of this area to justify using it in the situation mentioned.

Jamesaritchie
12-24-2006, 01:46 AM
I think this one may be a colloquialism too rare outside of this area to justify using it in the situation mentioned.

You may well be right. It might not confuse any reader who doesn't know the origin of the phrase, but all those who do would probably complain precisely because, when used properly, it isn't a colloquialism.

scarletpeaches
12-24-2006, 01:48 AM
I wouldn't say 'hauled' as that suggests a prolonged action, with prolonged effort. Jerked works well enough for me. It suggests a sharp, one-off action.

theGreyShadowcat
01-02-2007, 05:28 AM
What about "yanked"?

Popeyesays
01-02-2007, 06:29 AM
"jerked", "twisted", "yanked". "hauled", "wracked"

Regards,
Scott

Julie Worth
01-02-2007, 07:01 AM
Dogging a wheel to the left?

You're probably thinking of dogleg, which is a sharp turn, and derived from that, doglegging, which is neither a common nor pretty word.