PDA

View Full Version : Patron Saints



PeeDee
12-08-2006, 08:55 AM
This is inspired by JeanneTCG's signature, which tells us that Louis L'Amour is her patron saint.

I love that idea. I love the thought of having a writer as your patron saint. So, because it's late and I should be reading a slush pile, I'm here suggesting that we each pick a writer who is, in essence, a patron saint.

(if you choose to write to your patron writer and tell them this, please don't mention me; in fact, please don't write to them.)

Your Patron Saint should exemplify everything that you want to achieve with your writing, what you love about writing and reading. Your Patron Saint should be someone that you wouldn't mind being like, whom you have a great deal of respect for, both as a writer and/or as a person. See what I mean?

Anyway, I guess I'll do mine first. There. It's in my signature. :)

JeanneTGC
12-08-2006, 09:46 AM
*sniff*

PeeDee devoted a whole topic to my Patron Saint-ing.

I am so touched! And flattered! (That truly. :) )

I picked Louis L'Amour because the man had over 350 rejections (closer to 400, I believe) before he sold ONE single piece of his writing. He just kept on submitting and kept on writing. And then, one day, instead of a rejection, he got an acceptance.

And "became" Louis L'Amour -- prolific and beloved author in a variety of genres. His family is STILL publishing his works pothsmously (sp?) because he had so MANY that he just put into a box when they'd been rejected "enough" and then he wrote another piece, and so on.

THAT, my friends, is a man who never, ever took "not for us" or similar for his final answer. More than any other writer I know of, L'Amour represents the key to success to me -- perseverance.

I don't think Louis would appreciate any whining about one rejection here or there. Nor ten. Nor a hundred. And when I get the desire to whine about a small setback, I just think of my patron saint...and I send out something else and write a new piece, start a new novel, finish a WIP, send out something ELSE, write a new piece...well, you get the idea.

soloset
12-08-2006, 09:51 AM
I love Louis greatly; I'm not ashamed to admit my heart broke when he died and I realized I'd never get to finish the Sackett series. I'm owed one more book about Tell, that's all I'm saying.

I don't think I have a patron saint for my writing, honestly. I'll have to think about it...

PeeDee
12-08-2006, 09:53 AM
I picked Roger Zelazny, because he not only wrote wonderful and very original novels (in particular, Lord of Light is sheer brilliance) but you could feel his excitement and enjoyment practically brimming out of the text. Here was a man who took genres and stories and turned them on their ears...and had a delight in doing it.

It's the sense of fun, as well as the originality, which appeals to me.

soloset
12-08-2006, 10:15 AM
Okay, I think I've decided. But I reserve the right to change my mind on a whim.

George C. Chesbro.

He writes the stories he wants to write. Books that defy description while still being considered "genre". Eye-opening stuff that surprises and astonishes and is exactly not what you expected from something billed as a mystery.

And when he suddenly couldn't get published anymore (for whatever reasons -- I think it was the mid-list issues around '96), he went POD. Formed his own company and reprinted his own stuff. The only POD book I own, in fact, is one of his.

So, here's to determination, breaking too many rules, and writing a really good novel anyway because it's the story you want to tell.

ETA: Thanks for the reminder about Zelazny, by the way. I looked, and although I'm pretty sure the only book I've read by him is Changeling (and Madwands; it was a packaged deal), it turns out that I own several of his short story collections. I'll read them before I start American Gods.

NCRomanceWriter
12-08-2006, 06:42 PM
I have one.

I have chosen Betrice Small as my patron saint. I write romance, but I also enjoy a good mystery, or a thriller or a fantasy or a suspense or great sci fi...get the idea? As much as I enjoy all the "lovey dovey" romance, I do prefer one that is a great read. On my keeper shelf is a well worn copy of The Kadin. I feel that the story moves at a good pace, I love the visualizations, and the romance has just enough spice for me.

Coming a close second would be Barbara Taylor Bradford. A Woman of Substance is among my all time favorites. While I realize that Emma Harte is a fictional character, she reminds me that even truly successful people sometimes stumble, but always keep focused on what they want to achieve.

Haggis
12-08-2006, 06:46 PM
Is the Marquis de Sade taken?

aka eraser
12-08-2006, 06:56 PM
Jeepers, mine would vary with my mood. There's so many writers I admire. But the one who made me want to become a writer is J. P. Donleavy (http://www.jpdonleavycompendium.org/index.html).

RTH
12-08-2006, 08:38 PM
It may sound cliche, but why not Ol' Will?

If you want to talk about diversity, or sheer power of language, no one beats The Bard.

(Though a few come close...)

Nangleator
12-08-2006, 09:13 PM
Robert A. Heinlein.

He broke so much ground in my genre, and covered so many concepts so well that I worry he didn't leave anything fresh to write about. (Of course, since he helped make that genre what it is, I can't complain.)

He wrote opinionated characters so well that anyone who read a book or story jumped to the conclusion that those opinions were the author's.

He reached a point where everything he had written got published.

He lived life on his own terms, and created characters brave enough to do that themselves. This serves as a pretty good inspiration to his fans.

WerenCole
12-08-2006, 09:35 PM
I with take Saint Lucia. . .


Wait. . . Dante already has her. . . sh!t. . .


Let me think a little while on this one.

Kate Thornton
12-08-2006, 10:08 PM
Robert A. Heinlein.

He broke so much ground in my genre, and covered so many concepts so well that I worry he didn't leave anything fresh to write about. (Of course, since he helped make that genre what it is, I can't complain.)

He wrote opinionated characters so well that anyone who read a book or story jumped to the conclusion that those opinions were the author's.

He reached a point where everything he had written got published.

He lived life on his own terms, and created characters brave enough to do that themselves. This serves as a pretty good inspiration to his fans.

I met Mr. Heinlein in the 70s at Caltech. He was a fabulous person, loved women(!) and his wife Virginia was a funny and endearing person as well. I cut my literary teeth on the serialized Have Spacesuit, Will Travel...
And what libertarian could possibly ignore The Moon is a Harsh Mistress?

I was going to choose him for my patron saint, but I got to thinking about Alfred Bester and Carl Hiaasen - two more who should be in the Pantheon of my Patron Saints -

So all three today: Robert Anson Heinlein, Alfred Bester & Carl Hiaasen. A holy triumvirate for today.

Tomorrow it may be Kathy Reichs, Anita Shreve and Octavia Butler.

AnnieColleen
12-08-2006, 10:10 PM
I with take Saint Lucia. . .

I want St. Thomas More. :)

(What? He wrote!)

soloset
12-08-2006, 10:24 PM
I met Mr. Heinlein in the 70s at Caltech. He was a fabulous person, loved women(!) and his wife Virginia was a funny and endearing person as well. I cut my literary teeth on the serialized Have Spacesuit, Will Travel...
And what libertarian could possibly ignore The Moon is a Harsh Mistress?

Have Spacesuit, Will Travel is, quite possibly, my favorite book of all time. It's just flat out perfect on so many levels. There are other books I like better for specific reasons, but overall, nothing else makes me quite as happy as curling up with it and a soda and just reading.

And I never realized as a kid how advanced his fictional spacesuits were compared to what actually existed at the time. I just assumed they had space suits then, too, because he described them so well!

C.bronco
12-08-2006, 10:29 PM
I have to go with Ray Bradbury. Yes, yes.

Stew21
12-08-2006, 10:36 PM
Ernest Hemingway.

TrainofThought
12-08-2006, 10:36 PM
Mine will change about as much as my hair color does. I’ll go with St. William Shakespeare as my first saint.

Scarlett_156
12-08-2006, 11:05 PM
Snoop Dogg. Saint Snoopy is in tha hizzy... ya, that sounds good.

Maprilynne
12-08-2006, 11:26 PM
I'm going to cop out on this one and pick Stephenie Meyer. It's a cop-out because she's also my dear friend, but even if she weren't, she's inspiring to me because although she did get her degree in English, she was just a regular person with no contacts or connection and three little kids to boot. She got into the publishing industry the same way we are all trying to and is now a NYT bestseller.
And her stories are just great. And if you are not a YA fan (or a vampire fan) her first adult novel is coming out in 2008 and it is also absolutely wonderful.
So not super-creative, but she means a lot to me.

Maprilynne

Stormhawk
12-09-2006, 12:03 AM
I'm gonna be lame and mainstream and pick Neil Gaiman.

I've been in love with his work since I recieved the Sandman quote book for Christmas a couple of years ago. I was just a rabid fanboy until a couple of weeks ago when I realised that what I liked about his work (the strange that lurks just behind the humdrum everyday) is exactly what I wanted to write.

Haggis
12-09-2006, 12:07 AM
John Steinbeck.

Kate Thornton
12-09-2006, 12:22 AM
I'm going to cop out on this one and pick Stephenie Meyer. It's a cop-out because she's also my dear friend, but even if she weren't, she's inspiring to me because although she did get her degree in English, she was just a regular person with no contacts or connection and three little kids to boot. She got into the publishing industry the same way we are all trying to and is now a NYT bestseller.
And her stories are just great. And if you are not a YA fan (or a vampire fan) her first adult novel is coming out in 2008 and it is also absolutely wonderful.
So not super-creative, but she means a lot to me.

Maprilynne

She sounds like a *real* saint! I'll watch for her book.

Higgins
12-09-2006, 12:35 AM
This is inspired by JeanneTCG's signature, which tells us that Louis L'Amour is her patron saint.
:)

How about Isidore, proposed Patron Saint of the Internet?




Oratio ante colligationem in Interrete factam
Omnípotens aetérne Deus, qui nos secúndum imáginem Tuam plasmásti, et omnia bona, vera, pulchra, praesértim in divína persóna Unigéniti Fílii Tui Dómini nostri Iesu Chrísti, quaérere iussísti, praesta quaésumus ut, per intercessiónem Sancti Isidóri, Epíscopi et Doctóris, in peregrinatiónibus per interrete factis et manus oculósque ad quae Tibi sunt plácita intendámus et omnes quos convénimus cum caritáte ac patiéntia accipiámus. Per Christum Dóminum nostrum. Amen.



Prayer before logging on to the Internet
Almighty and eternal God, who hast created us in Thy image and hast bidden us to seek after all that is good, true and beautiful,especially in the divine person of Thy only-begotten Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, grant we beseech Thee that, through the intercession of Saint Isidore, bishop and doctor, during our journeys through the internet we will direct our hands and eyes only to that which is pleasing to Thee and treat with charity and patience all those souls whom we encounter. Through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Amen again.

J.S Greer
12-09-2006, 12:37 AM
Mine is Orlando Bloom...I mean, come on. How could he not be!?!

Toothpaste
12-09-2006, 01:39 AM
Hmm I'd have to say Douglas Adams is my patron saint.

My dad read me the Hitchhiker series when I was young and the voice was so different from the others I'd heard. It was so funny and bizarre, and I just loved it. And from then on I wanted to somehow emmulate him. Not immitate, just somehow capture that same joi de vie.
He has definitely had the biggest influence on my writing.

janetbellinger
12-09-2006, 01:41 AM
Alice Munro.

icerose
12-09-2006, 03:32 AM
I don't think I can pick one. I love so many authors across so many genre's and so many sstory types I just don't know how I'd do it.

I do have to agree with Louis L'Amour on his persistence. Amazing.

Soccer Mom
12-09-2006, 04:20 AM
Elizabeth Peters. I simply love Amelia Peabody. Her characters are funny and her mysteries are witty. I simply adore the first book.

TheIT
12-09-2006, 04:23 AM
Lois McMaster Bujold.

steveg144
12-09-2006, 04:31 AM
Albert Camus, master of all media: novels, short stories, plays, philosophical essays. Plus good-looking. Plus French. Camus is The Man.

ChaosTitan
12-09-2006, 05:16 AM
Joss Whedon. The man is just brilliant.

truelyana
12-09-2006, 05:17 AM
Rings a bell

Jenny
12-09-2006, 05:25 AM
Terry Pratchett - to create the Discworld, wow. And I love the humour and social commentary and ... Well, St Terry will a novena help get me published?

TrickyFiction
12-09-2006, 05:35 AM
Diana Wynn Jones
I wish I could create characters like that.

Serenity
12-09-2006, 05:39 AM
Joe Michael Straczynski, the great JMS.

*genuflects accordingly

allion
12-09-2006, 05:54 AM
Ray Bradbury:

"You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you."

Karen

MacAllister
12-09-2006, 06:24 AM
Virginia Woolf.

This week, at least.

Medievalist
12-09-2006, 06:28 AM
Gosh I think I have an entire calendar of patron saints.

If I had to pick one, I think I'd go with Anonymous; much of what I love best, and all the works I'm writing about, are by Anonymous. I like to think that at least some of them are by women.

Dawno
12-09-2006, 06:33 AM
Lots of good patron saints listed here - I've been pondering and think I need two - Erma Bombeck and Andre Norton.

CBeasy
12-09-2006, 07:20 AM
My patron saint is probably Hunter S. Thompson, he is absolutely the ideal of the style I attempt to write.

Nangleator
12-09-2006, 07:37 AM
Joe Michael Straczynski, the great JMS.
JMS!!

How could I forget?!

Medievalist
12-09-2006, 07:41 AM
Someday I shall live to see JMS and Joss Whedon on stage together :D

SherryTex
12-09-2006, 07:58 AM
I have two patron saints of writing. The first is Erma Bombeck. I want to write pieces like she did, where people open the paper to read her first because they want to laugh at the minutia in their lives that drives them nuts and is also dear to their hearts.

The second is Flannery O'Connor. The woman was a rock in her writing, her intellect and her faith. She wrote about the capacity of humanity to blind itself to its own failings in a way no one else dared, I love her guts and her ruthless willingness to see a story through even if it makes the characters somehow ugly. Hope I can write with as much steel and substance.

Sean D. Schaffer
12-09-2006, 10:41 AM
The writer I would choose as my Patron Saint would have to be Gene Roddenberry. Star Trek was one of the main inspirations for my early SF writing, which would eventually lead me into the Fantasy sub-genre. And the story of what he had to go through to get Star Trek onto the screen and keep it there, is helpful to me as a writer, partially because I am as of yet unpublished. His tenacity and his perseverance has been a tremendous example to me personally, of what a human being can do, if they never give up.

So yeah. Gene Roddenberry is my Patron Saint.

PeeDee
12-09-2006, 04:18 PM
Joss Whedon, Joe Straczynski, Walter M. Miller, Gene Wolfe, Neil Gaiman, John Steinback........I keep thinking of authors and going "Oh, I want to change my Patron Saint!"

*sigh*

jst5150
12-09-2006, 04:29 PM
Perhaps more apostles rather than saints:


Shel Silverstein.

Thomas Paine.

Mike Royko.

Mickey Spillane.

Thomas Jefferson.

Michael Moorcock.

Rick Reilly.

Jim Murray.

Jane Austen.

ee cummings

PeeDee
12-09-2006, 04:34 PM
Michael Moorcock is a saint. Absolutely. For the book "Behold The Man" if nothing else.

dclary
12-09-2006, 05:56 PM
Snoopy

Ardellis
12-09-2006, 06:46 PM
Fritz Leiber. You know in your bones that all the great fantasy cities are just Lankhmar with a new coat of paint, don't you?

PeeDee
12-09-2006, 06:49 PM
Fritz Leiber. You know in your bones that all the great fantasy cities are just Lankhmar with a new coat of paint, don't you?

Okay. Yeah. You're right.

Except maybe Ankh-Morpork. I think that might be its own creature by this point.

jst5150
12-09-2006, 07:34 PM
A couple of others just popped into frame:

Phillip K. Dick.

Douglas Adams.

pepperlandgirl
12-09-2006, 10:32 PM
I have three. Shakespeare, Miguel Cervantes (isn't writing a very quixotic thing anyway?) and Joss Whedon.

WriterInChains
12-10-2006, 04:49 AM
I'm not really into saints.

I do have a Pantheon, though: Shakespeare, Roddenberry, King, Kingsolver, L'Amour, Palahniuk, Adrienne Rich, Anne Tyler, Elizabeth Berg. (A couple more are on deck.)

They're all on the list for different reasons, but mainly it's about voice. Most of them also have a lot to say about issues/themes/whatever that speak to me, and are/were just kickass people.

UrsusMinor
12-10-2006, 10:53 AM
John Fowles and Jane Smiley, and both for the same reason: diverse output in terms of genre and subject matter, while still maintaining literary quality.

I have to second Pee Dee, though: Zelazny was a master and "Lord of Light" is a tour de force. Until I read Zelazny, I never knew how much fun could be had with a sudden, deliberate drop from high tone to low.

PeeDee
12-10-2006, 10:58 AM
I have to second Pee Dee, though: Zelazny was a master and "Lord of Light" is a tour de force. Until I read Zelazny, I never knew how much fun could be had with a sudden, deliberate drop from high tone to low.

"The Chronicles of Amber" delighted me and made me want to go have fun writing a story, or a novel.

"Lord of Light" made me go sit on the couch and not write anything, because what can you write after that?

His short stories delight me no end. I miss him.

CaitlinK18
12-10-2006, 01:48 PM
Alan Moore. I love Gaiman more than life itself, but for sheer dystopian joy, you can't beat Moore. Plus he's reclusive and odd and English. What's not to love.

Mom'sWrite
12-11-2006, 10:17 AM
They all crowd in upon me...

The Brothers Grimm
Anna Sewell
Jane Austen
F. Scott Fitzgerald
D. H. Lawrence
Mark Twain
Daphne du Maurier
Robert Graves
Charles Dickens
Milan Kundera
William Shakespeare


It's a party every night!

JeanneTGC
12-11-2006, 11:13 AM
Okay. Yeah. You're right.

Except maybe Ankh-Morpork. I think that might be its own creature by this point.

But I think Ankh-Morpork stared out as Lankhmar turned on its side. I mean, Bravd and the Weasel were pretty clearly Fafrd and the Grey Mouser (and if I messed up the barbarian's name, don't shoot me; it's been a long while since I've read them and I now THINK of them as Bravd and the Weasel first, then remember who they "really" are later).

I'd have picked pTerry for my patron saint, but he's struggled a bit less than L'Amour did and I think I'm more on the L'Amour plan for instant success than the Pratchett one, more's the pity.

greatfish
12-12-2006, 04:47 PM
William Faulkner, for daring to write for himself and not his publishers.

engmajor2005
12-14-2006, 03:38 AM
Tolkien.

The apostles of my patron saint are:

C. S. Lewis
Neil Gaiman
Charles de Lint
Alan Moore
R. A. Salvatore
Ray Bradbury
W. B. Yeats

PeeDee
12-14-2006, 03:57 AM
Tolkien.

The apostles of my patron saint are:

C. S. Lewis
Neil Gaiman
Charles de Lint
Alan Moore
R. A. Salvatore
Ray Bradbury
W. B. Yeats

That would make a heck of a Last Supper painting... :D possibly a terrifying one.

BardSkye
12-14-2006, 08:43 AM
Isaac Asimov.

Prolific, brilliant, funny, deep and a helluva good storyteller.

allion
12-15-2006, 04:53 AM
We have to put Isaac at the Last Supper table as well. He gave prolific a new meaning.

Karen

janetbellinger
12-15-2006, 04:57 AM
Evelyn Waugh

WerenCole
12-15-2006, 05:04 AM
Mark Twain. . .


I told you I would get back to you. . .

Rolling Thunder
12-15-2006, 05:07 AM
Dr. Seuss

Danger Jane
02-05-2008, 08:59 AM
So I'm not much of one for reviving threads, but I think this one deserves it with so many new members scurrying around?

Virginia Woolf is my patron saint. She was an absolute frickin genius and I don't care if my writing is that dense, too. Dude. I searched her name on here and like half the posts at least were mine. SO.

OverTheHills&FarAway
02-05-2008, 09:13 AM
Neil Gaiman!

He may not be the most stellar writer in the entire history of writers, but he's consistently my favorite, and what I strive for. His humor, his heart, the worlds he creates and the characters he makes. His language. So beautiful.

Plus he's a genuinely nice guy who thinks it's amazing when he makes $90 in Croatia. As people are handing him million dollar checks left and right...

That's what I want to be. An awesome writer and awesome human being.

(And the million dollar checks wouldn't be so bad either)

L M Ashton
02-05-2008, 10:05 AM
Excellent thread revival, Danger Jane! :D

I'm not much into saints, so maybe I'll go with Heroes? :D And there are just so many of them. If I go back in history to when I first got addicted to science fiction, the first Heroes on my list have to be Gene Roddenberry has to be on the list, as does Robert Silverberg, Isaac Asimov, Arthur C Clarke, Anne McCaffrey, David Brin, Ben Bova, and, um, yeah, that's good for now. :D Thanks, older brother. :)

caromora
02-05-2008, 10:29 AM
Madeleine L'Engle.

jessicaorr
02-05-2008, 06:26 PM
OK, I have a little shelf above my printer that's just begging to be a shrine...

I already have a shrine to Ogma and Brigihd above my fireplace, I think I'll move it to the little shelf and put up a few pictures of great writers like Douglas Adams and Neil Gaiman.

Jessica= pagan word nerd :p

JoeEkaitis
02-05-2008, 06:50 PM
E. B. White, Kenneth Grahame, Frank Stockton.

Red-Green
02-05-2008, 08:22 PM
Ursula LeGuin and Anthony Trollope. If you can figure out how works, drop me a line, okay? 'Cause I'm still confused.

DeleyanLee
02-05-2008, 09:17 PM
Patron Saint of enveloping me in her world: Taylor Caldwell

Patron Saint of making the skeptic in me believe in love again: Laura Kinsale

Patron Saint of telling a great story without making me feel stupid: Issac Asimov

Patron Saint of Timeless Classic Story Telling: Charles Dickens

Paichka
02-05-2008, 10:31 PM
George RR Martin, Stephen King, Guy Gavrial Kay, and Carol Goodman. :)

ChaosTitan
02-06-2008, 04:59 AM
I :heart: this thread.


I'm not much into saints, so maybe I'll go with Heroes? :D

I read this, and the first thing I thought of was: Can I change my patron saint to Peter Petrelli? :LilLove:

Serenity
02-06-2008, 06:30 AM
I :heart: this thread.



I read this, and the first thing I thought of was: Can I change my patron saint to Peter Petrelli? :LilLove:

Whedon is still your patron saint, Peter is just your hero. :D

KTC
02-06-2008, 07:26 AM
I'd like to say JD Salinger is my patron saint, but I'd be lying. His character, Zachary Martin Glass, a.k.a. Zooey is actually my patron saint. I want to achieve the level of smartassedness that Salinger achieves in his writing. His characters are absolutely endearing and incredible. I know them. His Glass family is his opus...one of the best character pools in literature. I pray to a make believe God...I pray to Zooey Salinger. And I hope I keep him in my hip pocket.

KTC
02-06-2008, 07:30 AM
Hey Paichka... a friend of mine is doing a reading with Guy later this month. Click this:
HOT SAUCED WORDS (http://www.hotsaucedwords.ca/hotsaucedwords/?p=36)

L M Ashton
02-06-2008, 03:00 PM
I read this, and the first thing I thought of was: Can I change my patron saint to Peter Petrelli? :LilLove:

Oh heck ya. :D Especially since those were the Heroes of which I spoke. :D

Shweta
02-06-2008, 03:12 PM
If I have to pick one, I'd flip a coin between Ursula Le Guin and Terri Windling.

And while I adore their fiction, in both cases it's their non-fiction that's made them my heroes/patron saints.

Storm Dream
02-06-2008, 09:52 PM
Simon R. Green.

I love his writing style (fast-paced, descriptive but not too much) and his characters (smart AND funny), and the fact that he can always pull off a totally kickass heroine.

He's also got a hell of an imagination. Some of the weirdest stuff I've read is by him. I read Deathstalker Rebellion as an 11yo at summer camp and it was my introduction to grown-up space opera. I have loved him ever since.

He is just all kinds of awesome.

ChaosTitan
02-06-2008, 10:02 PM
Whedon is still your patron saint, Peter is just your hero. :D


Oh heck ya. :D Especially since those were the Heroes of which I spoke. :D


So who's going to deliver him to my doorstep, wrapped up in a nice red bow? :e2brows:

Paichka
02-07-2008, 03:45 PM
Hey Paichka... a friend of mine is doing a reading with Guy later this month. Click this:
HOT SAUCED WORDS (http://www.hotsaucedwords.ca/hotsaucedwords/?p=36)

That's really cool! I just finished Ysabel. I'm a big fan of him -- his writing is deceptively simple. Everytime I feel like I'm falling into the Land of Purple Prose, I just think of the Fionavar Tapestry and hit the delete key. ;)

So that's what he is, I guess -- The Patron Saint of Anti-Purple Prose.