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BottomlessCup
11-21-2006, 07:01 AM
How would it affect your writing?


Would you write less or more?

Would you change medium? Topic? Style?

Would you do as much rewriting?

Would you break more rules?

Rolling Thunder
11-21-2006, 07:11 AM
That's a good question! I read Ms. Snark's column and she pointed out frequency of writing was not as important as quality. I think she may be right.

Now, I do have some reservations on what 'quality' can be; there seems to be so many levels and opinions.

I've found myself writing horror shorts lately, but I don't know why. It just feels 'right' at this time. PeeDee made a good comment in the Burnt Toast thread that I think is helpful.

In any event, I enjoy stories and writing them down, whether they are ever published or not, is something I do for myself. Even though I hope to have most of them pubbed, someday.:)

OmenSpirits.com
11-21-2006, 07:46 AM
How would it affect your writing?


Would you write less or more?

Would you change medium? Topic? Style?

Would you do as much rewriting?

Would you break more rules?
It wouldn't effect it. It's my purpose. My drive. I'll live this way till I die. The publishing end is only a by-product of the creative process, not the ultimate goal. It's a desired goal, yes, to see one's name in print along with those you may read and or admire, but as long as I was driven to do so, to write, to create from the madness within and release the tales that come forth, then I'd be satisfied.

I never hinged my writing on the simple fact of seeing it published. I enjoy it when my writing is appreciated, and recognized as being quality, but to put it all on being published, just wouldn't keep to the truth of why I write.

MidnightMuse
11-21-2006, 08:51 AM
Hasn't stopped me yet! :D

BardSkye
11-21-2006, 08:55 AM
Wouldn't make any difference for me. I'm writing, and learning, and writing again to make my novels the best I can make them. Being up there with the big boys on the bookshelves would be nice but ultimately I'm writing because I like writing.

Southern_girl29
11-21-2006, 09:14 AM
I'm an eternal optimist. Even if someone told me I'd never make it (and with the odds being what they are, it could be true), I'd still believe there was a chance. So, I'd still work and still try to learn as much as I could.

greglondon
11-21-2006, 09:20 AM
If you knew - for sure - that you would never make it... How would it affect your writing?

As long as I saw that I was improving my skills in some way, I'd keep at it. I've hit lulls where I felt like I was stuck, didn't know what to do, and writing went on the back burner. The thing that kept me going was knowing that there was something I needed to learn, I just didn't know what it was at the time.

Sean D. Schaffer
11-21-2006, 09:22 AM
How would it affect your writing?

It would affect my writing somewhat, although not much. I will explain as I go further into this post.



Would you write less or more?

I probably would write about the same amount as I do now. To me, writing is a part of my life that I cannot just give up on. Even if I knew I would never make it--for certain--there would always be a reason to continue writing in my life. Whether it would be for my own private enjoyment, or for therapeutic reasons, I would not go without writing. It is a driving force that keeps me going, whether I ever 'make it' or not.


Would you change medium? Topic? Style?

Medium: No, I'd probably still use my typewriter. There's just something about the sound of my old manual typewriter that has a magical effect on my writing.

Topic: Maybe I would go for some other topics, as well as the ones I already write in. I mean, if I knew I would never go anywhere with my writing, then really there would be nothing inhibiting me from writing some of my darkest, deepest thoughts or fantasies.

Style: Probably not. The style I write in is something that is so much a part of me that I cannot change it much if I even wanted to. Like I pointed out before, it is a part of me.


Would you do as much rewriting?

Knowing the perfectionist that I am, I would probably do even more re-writing. Knowing that I would never make it would give me no incentive whatsoever to submit a work, and therefore I would probably continue improving upon my manuscripts until the day I die. I can always find something to correct...


Would you break more rules?

I'm not sure about that one. I might, but there would still be a sense within me of making my writing the best it can be. Even though other people might never read my work, I would have to live with the fact that I did not do my very best to make the work shine. That is something I would not want to live with.

Carmy
11-21-2006, 09:33 AM
Writing is like a drug I must have. Although I've published articles and short stories, my hope is to publish a novel.

Without hope, what are we?

Freckles
11-21-2006, 10:45 PM
Writing is in me, so I'd keep typing away! :D

ChaosTitan
11-22-2006, 02:44 AM
How would it affect your writing?


Would you write less or more?

Would you change medium? Topic? Style?

Would you do as much rewriting?

Would you break more rules?

I don't think it would affect my writing. After a long bout with depression, I'd get back on the horse and keep at it. I'd write the same amount, but with less urgency. I would still write the same stories, nothing could change the nuttiness in my head. ;)

I don't think I'd rewrite as much. I would probably revert to my fanfiction habits of "Spell check, quick grammar check, and then post." I don't break many rules to begin with, so I can't say I'd break more.

More than anything else, if I knew I'd never make it, I would find a new urgency to change day jobs. I hold onto this one with the hopes of supplimenting my income with writing, but if that was never to be, I'd hit the Classifieds.

Carrie in PA
11-22-2006, 03:02 AM
Since there are no guarantees anyway, I can't imagine it would change at all for me.

But then I have the luxury of doing with my writing whatever I please, no one is relying on my writing to put food on the table.

engmajor2005
11-22-2006, 03:14 AM
If I knew that I would never make it, I was guaranteed that I would never make it, then no; I would not stop writing. I would go to Lulu.com and put my book up there.

I'm only concerned about "making it" in so much as writing full-time and not having to work outside of that. But if I knew that I'd never make it, I would still write. I just wouldn't worry about breaking into the big time.

PS: By show of hands, who can't help but to hear Alf's voice as they read greglondon's posts?

jenfreedom
11-22-2006, 10:41 AM
I've been writing my whole life in one way or another. I'm not sure what constitutes a general "made it." I'd like to make most of my writing $ from articles and maybe write a book someday. In August I started concentrating on articles over copy work and have assumed that I'll give myself until Spring to be able to make a full-time living with just article sales.

So far it's going well. Not making a full-time living yet because article take a long time to pay up but I'll have enough coming in by January to be paying half the bills with just article $. I think that I would quit writing articles if I knew I was not going to make it. Not very artistic but I need to support my son and so I need to do something I can make a decent wage with.

I do really like writing article (especially the funny stuff) but I'm more into writing because it allows me to work at home and homeschool than because it's releasing some expression and need in me. Writing to me is more of a job. I like writing in general and I'm good enough that people will pay me to do it - it's work. If article writing seems to be panning out too slowly by Spring then I'd likely go back to writing copy and grants FT. Not as fun but does pay the bills.

Sometimes I think, "Wow it'd be so cool if I wrote something amazing and telling that changed lives" but usually I'm thinking about the money side not the art form side of writing. I feel like having a business mind set has actually helped me to get work because the rejections don't bother me in a personal way just in a business-"I missed out on some money" way so I just keep sending out the queries.

I had a friend who tried article writing. Everytime he got a rejection he'd mope and cease all work. He'd say "his art" was rejected and get depressed. He repeated this for years and never made enough money to cover even half his bills. That is no way to run a business and as a writer I feel like you almost need to be a business first and artist second. So, yeah I'd quit without a second thought. Plus for freedom of expression I always have my blog and journal.

Take care
~ Jennifer

dobiwon
11-22-2006, 05:30 PM
I have the privilege of having a full-time job (that I enjoy) outside of writing, so I don't have any financial pressure to publish. I've been writing a long time, and just started submitting a year ago. I wrote long before I ever thought of publishing anything, and I expect I'd write even if I come to think nothing will ever be published.

Cav Guy
11-22-2006, 06:08 PM
-snipped-
I've found myself writing horror shorts lately, but I don't know why. It just feels 'right' at this time. PeeDee made a good comment in the Burnt Toast thread that I think is helpful.

In any event, I enjoy stories and writing them down, whether they are ever published or not, is something I do for myself. Even though I hope to have most of them pubbed, someday.:)

Funny...I did the same thing with Westerns. I don't read the genre that much, but it just 'feels' right to write.

I'm like dobiwon in that I have a full-time job that is satisfying enough. I don't *need* to write in a financial sense, although the extra income would be nice. I've finished four novels (only one has been subbed anywhere) and am working on four more and a collection of short stories. How many of them will be subbed? Hard to say. Maybe only half. But I enjoy writing them, and have pulled 2-3 articles out of the research for two of the novels.

jchines
11-22-2006, 06:40 PM
A lot depends on what it means to "make it". If it means to write full-time, I don't expect I'll ever be able to do that, for health insurance reasons if nothing else.

If I knew I'd never again be published though ... I don't know. Much as I enjoy (and sometimes hate) the process of writing a story, a huge part of my motivation is knowing readers are hopefully enjoying what I've done. If only a handful of people would ever see my stuff, and I knew that would never change, I think I'd have a much harder time staying motivated.

On the other hand, I tend to be pretty stubborn, so I could easily go the opposite way. "Never make it, huh? I'll show you!" Actually, that's about how it went for the first 5-10 years after I started writing...

Gigi Sahi
11-22-2006, 07:02 PM
I would write regardless because I write for self-pleasure first; being published second. I've written for personal enjoyment for YEARS before I ever considered submitting my work for publication.

I have a cousin who has a lovely singing voice. For as long as I can remember, the whole family has been encouraging her to cut a demo and send it out to record companies. She's always refused by saying, "I sing for ME." Essentially, I feel the same way about writing.

Cat Scratch
11-23-2006, 03:32 AM
I'd still write. It might be a relief because the onus would be off me to be "good" but I would still stick to quality to the best of my ability and best of all, have fun. I try to write freely as if no one will ever judge it because my best stuff comes that way, but it's hard not to think of the editors and critics out there who will be reading it.

Shadow_Ferret
11-23-2006, 07:12 AM
If I knew for sure that I would never make it I'd quit writing. I'd stop kidding myself that I can write. And I'd probably stop hanging around here wasting everyone's time.

Not sure how I'd ever learn that though unless I could somehow see into the future or something.

So until then I guess I'll just struggle along, kidding myself that I can write and wasting everyone's time here.

Beyondian
11-23-2006, 07:17 AM
If I knew i would never make it... hmmm...
Well, I'm not writing only to get published. Being published is part of the goal, but the main reason I write is my characters tell me to. :D
So I would continue.
(Gotta keep 'em quiet somehow)

KTC
11-23-2006, 03:32 PM
How would it affect your writing?

It wouldn't.

Would you write less or more?

The same amount.

Would you change medium? Topic? Style?

No. No. No.

Would you do as much rewriting?

Yes.

Would you break more rules?

No. I already firmly believe in breaking any rules that get in my way.

Annabella
11-23-2006, 09:02 PM
How would it affect your writing?

I'd probably write more. My inner editor wouldn't be able to chatter so loud.

Really, seriously she needs to shut up-I haven't written in about three weeks. Someone take her-Please!

Would you write less or more?

See Above

Would you change medium? Topic? Style?

No. I already write in a variety of genres and forms.

Would you do as much rewriting?

Yes. I actually like rewriting. It means I've gotten over the giant hurdle of getting it written in the first place.

Would you break more rules?

There are rules?

TrickyFiction
11-23-2006, 09:32 PM
I would probably write more fearlessly.
At the same time, my motivation to improve might lessen.
I'm not entirely sure about either of those, though.

MyFirstMystery
11-25-2006, 02:36 AM
I write to communicate with the world - not simply for my own gratification. So as much as I love to write, part of that love comes from the notion of sharing parts of my mind with others.

I don't know what "make it" really means though. I don't plan on making buckets of dough from my writing. But if others will read it - that is good enough for me.

I don't think it would change the way I write.

MFM

JeanneTGC
11-27-2006, 08:39 AM
"I write for myself and strangers. The strangers, dear Reader, are an afterthought," Gertrude Stein.

What she said :D .

nighttimer
11-28-2006, 10:30 AM
What constitutes "making it?"

If it's sitting at a table in the middle of a book store schlepping copies of a novel I've slaved over for the past 10 years, then NO---I'm probably not "making it."

If it means being able to write on a regular basis, get published and get paid for it, I've been there and done that. It's always nice to pass that $600 point in freelance payments. That means I have something to report to the I.R.S.

I've "made it" in some ways, but not enough ways. More people deserve to be exposed to my talent.

Why should I deny them? ;)

Kudra
11-28-2006, 03:35 PM
How would it affect your writing?
It depends on how you define "making it," but I don't think it would in any substantial way.

Would you write less or more?
The same amount. I write a lot of stuff that's not for publication. Maybe they'll find all of it when I'm dead and gone.

Would you change medium? Topic? Style?
Yes, for sure. I write non-fiction, so even though I get to throw in my style a lot, it still has to be formatted for the particular publication. Topics-- possibly not. I'd write only first-person if I wasn't writing for publication.

Would you do as much rewriting?
Hell no! Why would I? (On second thoughts, I'd rewrite until I was satisfied with it, but wouldn't go crazy with edits like I do now.)

Would you break more rules?
Nope. Do enough of that already!

TsukiRyoko
11-28-2006, 03:54 PM
How would it affect your writing?


Would you write less or more?

Would you change medium? Topic? Style?

Would you do as much rewriting?

Would you break more rules?

Though I'd be extremely downtrodden, I would probably write with a much freer style. I read some of my old stories I had written before I was serious about writing, and despite the horrible quality, the sense the stories gave off was so free and unrestrained.

If I had already become a more serious writer like I am now and knoew I'd never make it, I'd probably write less from sheer disappointment. But, if I had never become serious, I'd probably be pumping them out on the hour because I wouldn't feel as obligated to make a good story as I am now.

My topic would not change, but my medium and style probably would. I'd go back to handwriting my stories in big old notebooks and my style would go back to its sloppier, I-Don't-Give-A-Damn slightly tasteless flare.

I would NEVER rewrite. Before I had hope of publishing, I never rewrote a story in my life. First idea to jump into my brain was on paper and not a word of it changed. Ever.

Would I break more rules? Only pertaining to grammar, since that's the only rule left to break for me. I never did like following them in the first place. ;)

CBeasy
11-29-2006, 07:21 AM
I basically agree with Tsuki. The main change in my writing technique when I'm planning on submitting something is in the final stages. If I intend on keeping something personal, or just sharing with a few close friends, I don't care too much about final proof reading or rewriting. As long as I got my idea out on paper, and it's comprehensible to another person, I'm good. If I'm going to submit it, or plan on a large number of people reading it, i rewrite it obsessively until it's barely the same piece that I had when I started.

jamiehall
12-01-2006, 12:09 AM
How would it affect your writing?


Would you write less or more?


If I were single, I would write just as much. But, being married, if I knew for sure I would never make it, I would write less in order to be merciful to my husband (writing does take away from family time).


Would you change medium? Topic? Style?

Nope. I want to write what I want to write.


Would you do as much rewriting?

Absolutely. I'm sure my writing would still attract a few readers on the Internet, and I'd want them to have the experience of reading something that had gone through seven or eight overhauls.


Would you break more rules?

I would probably never again worry that a piece was too long. But I would still worry if it was boring, and I'd make cuts for that reason.

aghast
12-01-2006, 12:16 AM
How would it affect your writing?


Would you write less or more?

Would you change medium? Topic? Style?

Would you do as much rewriting?

Would you break more rules?

great questions - for me, i think i will affect me that i wouldnt really care about what other people think and i will write whatever i want and so i will probably write more, i will write more sex and violence and kinky stuff and i will experiment really outrageously, i will still rewrite but not to perfection

WriterInChains
12-01-2006, 08:37 AM
How would it affect your writing?

It really wouldn't. I did have some early success, & it's great to hold a book in your hands & see your name in the table of contents, but that's not the be-all & end-all. I'm too stubborn to believe there's no chance for any more success anyway.


Would you write less or more?

The same. Every free moment, & then some.


Would you change medium? Topic? Style?

Nope. I write what I write. Opening a different vein would still spill the same blood.


Would you do as much rewriting?

Yep, that's part of the fun! Watching the scene that started out so-so throw rainbows onto the walls from the polishing.


Would you break more rules?

I don't think it's possible, but I might try just for fun. :D

Kate Thornton
12-01-2006, 07:26 PM
I don't think I would change a thing. I know I'm not going to live forever, but that doesn't make me any less enthusiastic about the life I *do* have.

billythrilly7th
12-03-2006, 08:53 AM
How would it affect your writing?


It would put an end to it.

Riddler
12-04-2006, 03:19 AM
How would it affect your writing?

I could only know "- for sure-" if somebody popped in from the future and told me. And then, I would need proof, so the time traveler would have to recall events from our time to establish his or her identity. We would experience these revelations during a music montage. Then I would be freaked out for a bit. Then I would say, wow, you traveled back in time just to crush my dreams? You're a time travelin' turd, you know that?

Would you write less or more?

I would probably write about the same amount. But eventually I hope to learn to type with more than two fingers.

Would you change medium? Topic? Style?

Anything I write sounds absurd already, so I better stick with Humor.

Would you do as much rewriting?

I rarely do any rewriting. I know you're supposed to leave your own Editor Filter off during the creative process, but I'm far too neurotic to allow myself not to clean it up as I go. My visit from the time-traveler probably won't change that.

Would you break more rules?

I would know already that I'm alive at some point in the future, so I would do more death-defying stunts.

janetbellinger
12-04-2006, 03:22 AM
How would it affect your writing?


Would you write less or more?

Would you change medium? Topic? Style?

Would you do as much rewriting?

Would you break more rules?

I'd break more rules

jamiehall
12-04-2006, 07:02 AM
How would it affect your writing?

I could only know "- for sure-" if somebody popped in from the future and told me. And then, I would need proof, so the time traveler would have to recall events from our time to establish his or her identity. We would experience these revelations during a music montage. Then I would be freaked out for a bit. Then I would say, wow, you traveled back in time just to crush my dreams? You're a time travelin' turd, you know that?



:roll: :roll: :banana: :roll:

Stew21
12-04-2006, 08:46 PM
I've never operated on the assumption that I would make it anywhere. I don't submit my work (at least not yet). I would write the same, the same amount, the same revisions, the same style and topics, the same everything.
I don't do it because I believe it's going to get me somewhere other than where I am. I do it because I love it, it is part of who I am, and the joy of the journey is still there.