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nancy02664
11-18-2006, 04:13 AM
Anyone here write about atheism (or secularism, or freethought, or rationalism, etc.)?

I've begun a book and several essays concerning atheism, and I'm wondering if anyone else has published anything similar and/or has any information on the best markets for this sort of work.

For instance, are certain secular magazines easier to get into than others? Which publishing houses (besides Prometheus (http://www.prometheusbooks.com/)) welcome submissions with an irreligious slant?

Thanks in advance. :)

nancy02664
11-28-2006, 09:45 PM
But for what it's worth, I don't think atheism has much play anymore. Agnosticism is a much smarter avenue. I say that because, since God's existence cannot be conclusively disproven, most non-Christians would classify themselves as agnostic. In my mind, that makes sense, to remain undecided. You can argue the illogic of the atheistic and faithful point of view pretty persuasively as an agnostic. But, this is just my take on it.

"Has much play anymore"? Actually, there are a ton atheists out there (and a good number of atheist publications as well). Thanks for the response, but I'm not here to defend my viewpoint -- just trying to get some information.

nancy02664
11-28-2006, 11:10 PM
Scarlett,

Thanks. I understand what you're saying -- I've read essays and message boards just like the ones you refer to. Sometimes I'll come across something very insightful, but I agree that much of that stuff isn't too impressive.

What I'm writing will (hopefully) be a little more useful. It isn't meant to convert (or de-convert) anyone; it isn't meant to start debate or delve into the philosophical. It's more along the lines of 'how to survive in a world dominated by religious people' -- that sort of thing. So I'm writing it with a pretty specific, non-religious audience in mind.

veinglory
11-28-2006, 11:24 PM
That seems a deeply unsympathetic approach from a person who writes about religion. Surely you can appreciate that it goes both ways? I don't read about theism all that much, but I don't diss it or attempt to marginalise it either. I write about spirituality as a secular humanist and am stunned to find this inquiry was met with such blatant intolerance and apparent direspect for both atheist writers and writing about atheist spiritualities. If you don't read or write in this area, why reply to this enquiry?

nancy02664
11-28-2006, 11:35 PM
I'm with Scarlett 156 on this. It gets pretty old hearing someone argue for the non-existence of something. Seems sad and bitter to me. I'd much rather hear someone slaughter all sacred cows than just pick and choose from the other guy's pasture.
Like I mentioned, I'm not arguing for/against anything in my writing, so I'm not sure what you're getting at here.

And, "sad and bitter"? Are you trying to start some sort of argument here? If so, I don't appreciate it. I'm not here to defend my stance; I'd simply like to find other people who write for non-religious audiences and talk about the markets.

veinglory
11-28-2006, 11:41 PM
I haven written a little about realtions between atheism and the occult, secular humanism and its relation to animal welfare. Probably not much help as it is not an area I have been actively seeking publication yet but feel free to PM me. I was thinking of writing some material for one of the skeptics magazines.

Scarlett_156
11-28-2006, 11:47 PM
In no way did I intend for my remarks to be taken personally. This is an observation I have after reading a lot of atheist essays and debating the subject extensively with various friends and acquaintances. There IS something definitely to be said about intolerance for the views of others and how religion affects politics and society, and in that regard atheist writing can be quite helpful for the world in general. In my OWN PERSONAL OPINION, however, I do not need to be convinced of anything as far as beliefs go, and my observation on reading a lot of atheist writing is that it doesn't do much to convince an intelligent reader to change his or her beliefs.

If an atheist writer could somehow figure out an angle that would sway the minds of the undecided and put the fear of God (whoops!) into religious bigots, then that would be HUGE. Ayn Rand is one writer I can think of who did somewhat further the cause of atheism-- and yet she seldom spoke out directly against religion or for atheism. Her stance was simply that the rational objectivist rejects that which cannot be proven, and she let it go at that. Food for thought.

veinglory
11-28-2006, 11:50 PM
You seem to assume atheists care about converting people. Very few do--and most of them are pretty irritating. But in the absence of hell, heaven and damnation (from my point of view) people can believe whatever works for them.

My writing is relating to how non-theist spiritualities work and how they apply to real life settings--also some real life stuff like how to live in Christian and Muslim-normed communities in a way that is honest but unobtrusive. So atheist point if view, not atheiust agenda (whatever that would be).

Wiser people than me believe in God/s -- far be it from me to say they shouldn't.

SLake
11-29-2006, 04:10 AM
Nancy, I'm interested, as per:
...For instance, are certain secular magazines easier to get into than others? Which publishing houses (besides Prometheus (http://www.prometheusbooks.com/)) welcome submissions with an irreligious slant?


I wonder if you could suggest any agents interested in irreligious slants? Irreligious, according my dictionary means indifferent or hostile towards religion and that is the Humanist approach, but by irreligious I like to mean humorous-- tongue-in-cheek; though not quite (Monty) Pythonesque. I hope this doesn't look like a shopping list! Particularly since you ask, which publishing houses (besides Prometheus)... but I thought I'd ask you anyway since your mind seems to move in the area of markets.

Although my angle on irreligious doesn't just find humour in religion. I like to bundle up the lot as a joke. I suppose that means I'm an anarchist, but then I like good manners...

nancy02664
11-29-2006, 11:02 PM
I haven written a little about realtions between atheism and the occult, secular humanism and its relation to animal welfare. Probably not much help as it is not an area I have been actively seeking publication yet but feel free to PM me. I was thinking of writing some material for one of the skeptics magazines.

Sounds like we're at the same stage. :) I'm currently doing some market research, and if I come across any publications that seem a good fit for what you've written, I'll let you know.

nancy02664
11-30-2006, 03:07 AM
I wonder if you could suggest any agents interested in irreligious slants? Irreligious, according my dictionary means indifferent or hostile towards religion and that is the Humanist approach, but by irreligious I like to mean humorous-- tongue-in-cheek; though not quite (Monty) Pythonesque.

Perhaps the tongue-in-cheek stuff might be a good fit to an agent who simply represents humor?

Before I signed with my agent, I combed through lists of agents and their areas of interest. Unfortunately, I didn't find any that specifically mentioned atheism, skepticism, humanism, or anything similar.

But I'd guess that some agents interested in 'religion' may in fact be open to both religious and irreligious books, as I've often seen irreligious books shelved in the religion section (strange as that is).

Scarlett_156
11-30-2006, 03:42 AM
You seem to assume atheists care about converting people.
That I feel is a reasonable assumption to make-- if the amount of verbal vitriol that's leveled at people who believe in God (or whatever) on atheist/religious discussion forums is any indication, a great many atheists DO seem patently interested in swaying others to their views. My very best friend in the whole world hurt my feelings badly one time when he ridiculed me for saying that he couldn't prove there was no God-- he said that if I could stand up in any way for "belief in ghosts" then I must be nothing less than a moron.

If someone says that to someone who's making a reasonable argument, then it certainly seems that that person DOES desire for the other person to believe the same way he or she does-- or face ridicule. Otherwise they would just let it alone, right?

If one does not desire to change the viewpoints of others by making a good case for one's own views, why write about one's views at all? On discussion forums I almost NEVER talk about my personal opinions or beliefs (and if I do I label them as such) because I very seldom care if anyone agrees with them or not. The only people I argue with are my homies-- because our differences of opinion cut a great deal closer to the bone, and formulating consensus or agreement is a more important matter with one's friends or family (though of course it is not always achievable).

As a side note: The above incident occurred many years ago. Recently, after I told this same friend about a dream I'd had in which I had spoken with his recently deceased grandmother, I asked my friend if he was still adamant about there being no Creator or afterlife. His response: "I'm not sure anymore."

nancy02664
11-30-2006, 04:23 AM
if the amount of verbal vitriol that's leveled at people who believe in God (or whatever) on atheist/religious discussion forums is any indication, a great many atheists DO seem patently interested in swaying others to their views.

There are definitely atheists out there who are adamant about de-converting people, but I think they make up a rather small (albeit vocal) percentage of the total non-believing population, and their opinions don't necessarily represent the opinions of the larger group.


If one does not desire to change the viewpoints of others by making a good case for one's own views, why write about one's views at all?

To express an opinion? To share an experience? To start a friendly debate? To educate others? To reach out to those who might agree, but be afraid to speak up? There are a ton of reasons. People who have opinions do not need to defend those opinions if they don't want to -- they can simply write about them. What's wrong with that?

veinglory
11-30-2006, 04:35 AM
You seem to assume atheists care about converting people.

That I feel is a reasonable assumption to make-- "

I disagree. You stereotype a large group by those that cross your path and make a spectical of themselves. It's like saying all elephants live in circuses when you've never been to Africa.

Can you not see that the very fact that I have no interest whatsoever in coverting you makes the statement false as a blanket statement, right there?

Why write about atheist perspective? Why write about Christian perspectives?

e.g. To explore their nature and rationality. To appreciate the diversity of approached within atheism. To share with others who believe similarly. For a start, did you notice the magazine we are discussing are aimed at atheist populations? Athiesm is not anti-theism.

kikazaru
12-01-2006, 08:57 AM
I believe atheists are very rational people and most do not try to convert anyone.

Nancy, the website "The Panda's Thumb" has essays and at the bottom of the "annotated skeptics bible" link http://www.skepticsannotatedbible.com/ there is a list of blogs and essays done by various people. I wonder if you searched them by name if you would find various markets where they sold their work?

Thomma Lyn
12-01-2006, 09:29 AM
Just found this thread. FWIW I'm querying agents for a novel (mainstream/literary crossover) about an atheistic, rationalist young woman who falls in love with a progressive preacher. Though they have their share of challenges to overcome -- their challenges are the story -- neither one of them tries to change or convert the other.

SLake
12-01-2006, 10:24 AM
Just found this thread. FWIW I'm querying agents for a novel (mainstream/literary crossover) about an atheistic, rationalist young woman who falls in love with a progressive preacher. Though they have their share of challenges to overcome -- their challenges are the story -- neither one of them tries to change or convert the other.

Sounds unique to me. I can't get my mind around your story except to presume their love must be greater than incidentals like religion and atheism? Maybe they're just too busy elsewhere and so cling to each other, blocking out the world's incidentals? Maybe a combination of being too busy and love? Maybe preacher to him is just a job, and she, rationalist, in looking to learn from her experience (as rationalists primarily do) engages with him in a relationship, so that a sound appraisal of him will serve her later should she confront arguments about religion? Maybe the same but reverse applies to his relationship with her?

I should stop here. :)

nancy02664
12-01-2006, 11:20 AM
Nancy, the website "The Panda's Thumb" has essays and at the bottom of the "annotated skeptics bible" link http://www.skepticsannotatedbible.com/ there is a list of blogs and essays done by various people.

Thank you for the link! I will check that out.

nancy02664
12-01-2006, 11:21 AM
Must stay away from this thread.

Agreed.

nancy02664
12-01-2006, 11:47 AM
Getting back to the topic...

My market research has been going well so far. I've compiled a list of about 50 atheist magazines/newsletters, a number of podcasts/videocasts, and I'm discovering there are literally several hundred decent atheist/humanist websites out there (and many more not-so-decent ones). Not to mention about a bazillion blogs...

As far as publishers go, I've found many (like Amacom (http://www.amanet.org/books/index.htm), Duckworth (http://www.duckw.com/)(UK) & Routledge (http://www.routledge.com/)) that have (or will be) publishing books with a secular theme, and I'm pretty happy about that. Most are small presses & university presses.

I'll update if/when I learn something new...

pepperlandgirl
12-01-2006, 12:17 PM
Can you send me a PM or email with the magazines/newsletters you've found?

nancy02664
12-01-2006, 12:37 PM
Just found this thread. FWIW I'm querying agents for a novel (mainstream/literary crossover) about an atheistic, rationalist young woman who falls in love with a progressive preacher. Though they have their share of challenges to overcome -- their challenges are the story -- neither one of them tries to change or convert the other.

Not sure this will be of interest to you, but Atheist Alliance has a pretty big index of books (http://www.atheistalliance.org/books/index.php), some of which are fiction. I'm seeing Cypress House Press, Crossroad Publishing Company, Thomas Jefferson Press, Prometheus, and some others... might be publishers to keep in mind...

nancy02664
12-01-2006, 12:39 PM
Can you send me a PM or email with the magazines/newsletters you've found?

Love to--but everything's a bit disorganized at the moment.

Actually...maybe in a week or two I'll just post what I've found directly in this thread? So anyone interested can have a place to start. (I can PM it to you as well, if you'd like.)

veinglory
12-01-2006, 07:02 PM
I'll be happy to throw in the names of the ones I've been looking at, but it's a shorter list mainly of magazine I read from time to time.

Thomma Lyn
12-03-2006, 07:55 PM
Not sure this will be of interest to you, but Atheist Alliance has a pretty big index of books (http://www.atheistalliance.org/books/index.php), some of which are fiction. I'm seeing Cypress House Press, Crossroad Publishing Company, Thomas Jefferson Press, Prometheus, and some others... might be publishers to keep in mind...

Thanks, Nancy! Looks like a great resource. :)

nancy02664
12-07-2006, 05:05 AM
Magazines
American Atheist (http://www.americanatheist.org/)
Free Inquiry (http://www.secularhumanism.org/index.php?section=fi&page=index)
Skeptical Inquirer (http://www.csicop.org/si/)
Skeptic Magazine (http://www.skeptic.com/the_magazine/index.html)
Philo (http://www.philoonline.org/)
Newsletters
Critical Thinker (http://www.unitedstatesatheists.com/cgi-bin/page_display.cgi?page_nav_name=criticalthiYH&pass_parent=0)
Newspapers
Freethought Today (http://www.ffrf.org/fttoday/)
Scholarships
American Atheists (http://www.atheists.org/family/html/scholarship.html)
Freedom from Religion Foundation (http://www.ffrf.org/essay/)
None of these (except the scholarships) seem to be paying markets. Also, I can't guarantee that all of the above publications necessarily accept submissions (some have writers' guidelines, others do not). I'll add to this list over the coming weeks...

Thomma Lyn
12-09-2006, 09:21 PM
Sounds unique to me. I can't get my mind around your story except to presume their love must be greater than incidentals like religion and atheism? Maybe they're just too busy elsewhere and so cling to each other, blocking out the world's incidentals? Maybe a combination of being too busy and love? Maybe preacher to him is just a job, and she, rationalist, in looking to learn from her experience (as rationalists primarily do) engages with him in a relationship, so that a sound appraisal of him will serve her later should she confront arguments about religion? Maybe the same but reverse applies to his relationship with her?

I should stop here. :)

LOL! Though my main character is strong in her atheistic beliefs, she falls for the progressive preacher (and he's pretty darned progressive :) ) because she sees him as more than the sum of his religious beliefs, and he sees her as more than the sum of her atheistic beliefs. They fall in love as people, not as “ists” or “isms.” It’s complicated to explain, but that’s really a big part of what I’m trying to get across in the book.

I’ve seen such disparities in real life, too: for example, (1) a hippie Buddhist lady and a conservative Catholic guy falling in love and enjoying a successful marriage and (2) a former Baptist minister falling in love and enjoying a successful marriage with a third-degree Wiccan priestess.

My novel is, at its core, about a couple finding common ground for love as two individuals despite differing ideology and "isms" while still remaining true to themselves.

SLake
12-10-2006, 04:35 AM
LOL! Though my main character is strong in her atheistic beliefs, she falls for the progressive preacher (and he's pretty darned progressive :) ) because she sees him as more than the sum of his religious beliefs, and he sees her as more than the sum of her atheistic beliefs. They fall in love as people, not as ďistsĒ or ďisms.Ē Itís complicated to explain, but thatís really a big part of what Iím trying to get across in the book.

Iíve seen such disparities in real life, too: for example, (1) a hippie Buddhist lady and a conservative Catholic guy falling in love and enjoying a successful marriage and (2) a former Baptist minister falling in love and enjoying a successful marriage with a third-degree Wiccan priestess.

My novel is, at its core, about a couple finding common ground for love as two individuals despite differing ideology and "isms" while still remaining true to themselves.

A beautiful concept. I felt emotional reading your explanation. It's a lovely way of saying, love overcomes all.

But... I see your examples--but the only way I can see what you mean is by my father's example, a strict ism conservative living with an untidy scatterbrained redneck woman.

I'm surprised at myself for having difficulty picturing how such situations work. They obviously work and I guess it's thru acceptance as you've outlined. I hadn't even thought about my father+redneck juxtaposition! It was my wife who explained, and I think generally women are more agile at comprehending complex situations of love (and not just love), and beside that, I'm a bit slow sometimes.

Taking it a step farther, because we are in Religious and Spiritual, if there is a Second Coming, surely It (male, female, both??) will boot out all the darned isms.

So I think your book is a beautiful concept, and one I'd like to read.

sunandshadow
12-10-2006, 05:25 AM
There are probably plenty of atheist writers on absolutewrite, but not so many in the religious and spiritual writing forum.

I've written a few semi-philosophical things on why people imagine things (such as gods and magic) and the disphoria caused by the incompatibility between a sentient mind and an inhumane mechanical universe, and a little bit on socialist ethics, but that doesn't sound like quite what you're looking for.

Thomma Lyn
12-10-2006, 07:35 AM
A beautiful concept. I felt emotional reading your explanation. It's a lovely way of saying, love overcomes all.

But... I see your examples--but the only way I can see what you mean is by my father's example, a strict ism conservative living with an untidy scatterbrained redneck woman.

I'm surprised at myself for having difficulty picturing how such situations work. They obviously work and I guess it's thru acceptance as you've outlined. I hadn't even thought about my father+redneck juxtaposition! It was my wife who explained, and I think generally women are more agile at comprehending complex situations of love (and not just love), and beside that, I'm a bit slow sometimes.

Taking it a step farther, because we are in Religious and Spiritual, if there is a Second Coming, surely It (male, female, both??) will boot out all the darned isms.

So I think your book is a beautiful concept, and one I'd like to read.

Thank you so much SLake. You kind words mean more than you can know. :) My beta readers have raved over the novel, but so far I haven't had much luck with agents. You've encouraged me to hang in there with it, and you've made a fellow writer happy tonight.

Scarlett_156
12-10-2006, 07:54 AM
Modern Satanism is atheism with a very slight twist of religion. "Mundanity, materialism, rejection of everything spiritual, glorification of everything carnal."

Check it out! :D

veinglory
12-10-2006, 08:28 AM
Well, there are three main traditions under the banner of Satanist, roughly speaking the hedonists, the egotists and the anti-Judeo-Christians. Some of them are atheist and some aren't...

nancy02664
12-10-2006, 11:43 PM
There are probably plenty of atheist writers on absolutewrite, but not so many in the religious and spiritual writing forum.

Good point. I would have liked to talk about atheism in a 'philosophy' section, but there isn't one here, so I figured the religion section was the next best thing. You're right, though -- there probably aren't too many atheists hanging out here.

I wonder if the mods would consider changing the name so that it reads something like "religious, spiritual and philosophical writing," so that non-religious people can gather here as well. I'll try PMing a few people to see if that can be done...

SLake
12-11-2006, 05:36 AM
Thank you so much SLake. You kind words mean more than you can know. :) My beta readers have raved over the novel, but so far I haven't had much luck with agents. You've encouraged me to hang in there with it, and you've made a fellow writer happy tonight.

Go look at www.manuslit.com and find How to Pitch, The Perfect Pitch by Jillian Manus. First she describes a story about the Barrier Reef in Australia (at which I thought, yeah, sounds like my half page pitches and they assure rejection), but then on the next page she narrows the half page to a perfect pitch of a couple of sentences.

My wife keeps telling me my proposals are too complicated. Another writer on this board said something similiar to me, but closer to the bone, ouch. I wasn't submitting to her, but I reckon she was thinking like an agent/publisher.

Sketching a thumbnail seems almost like cheating, even cheapening us and our intended agent/pubs, but thumbnails seem to be the way it works.

It's weird, we writers sum up mighty emotions in single sentences, but when agents/pubs want impact in a sentence, we can't do it?

Discussing your story with my wife, she mentioned a TV documentary about odd couples like big biker and little lawyer lady. There's Robinson Crusoe, (only similar) but there are other similar stories peeping at the corners of my memory. I'm certain I've read or watched them right through.

I guess they offer cynics like me an angle on redemption. I hope you persist, because I think your story is important.

Thomma Lyn
12-11-2006, 06:26 AM
I hope you persist, because I think your story is important.

Thank you so very much for your kind words and encouragement! :) I sent you a PM (private message) responding in greater detail.

Shadow_Ferret
12-11-2006, 07:43 AM
Modern Satanism is atheism with a very slight twist of religion. "Mundanity, materialism, rejection of everything spiritual, glorification of everything carnal."

Check it out! :D

Maybe I'm missing your point, but if you're a Satanist, then you're a THEIST, not an atheist.

veinglory
12-11-2006, 10:19 PM
Yes, you are missing the point, but it was desogned to be missed. The two most popular religions that go by the title of 'satanist' (modern satanism, neosatanism etc) do not include a literal belief in God or the devil, and one of them is doctrinally atheist. Confusing, but true.

Shadow_Ferret
12-12-2006, 01:29 AM
So they're just using the term "Satan" because it sounds cool? Because Satanism is the belief in Satan and worshipping him over that other guy.

veinglory
12-12-2006, 01:48 AM
There is a deep symbolic connection that has to do with Satan falling from grace due to loving himself more than he loved God. Modern Satanism has to do with emrbacing autonomy and pleasure as symbolised by Satan's choice and becomeing one's own God. But yes, there is also evidence of a certain delight in the fact that most people will misunderstand and launch into irrelevant rants about the devil.

Shadow_Ferret
12-12-2006, 10:54 PM
That's just silly. Sometimes people's reasoning escapes me.

TSByrne
12-18-2006, 12:30 PM
Frankly, I'm surprised that Satanism isn't popular. The Milton-esque character of the devil is extremely sympathetic, whereas God comes off as a domineering jackass. Since youths love to rebel (with good reason), I can easily see how they'd use Satan as a symbol both to emulate his devotion to himself over dogma and to piss people off.

Yes, it is silly, but we live in an age of frivolity, so what does one expect?

And then of course there are people who call Aleister Crowley and other such occult philosophers "satanists," but that is really just complete and blatant ignorance.

Bravo
12-18-2006, 07:10 PM
But yes, there is also evidence of a certain delight in the fact that most people will misunderstand and launch into irrelevant rants about the devil.

Which is why real satanists wouldn't call themselves that, because they would be too self-serving/ego driven to be petty.

I kind of think of Ayn Rand as a Satanist, i.e. someone who advocates serving yourself above anything else. That's very much in line with Milton's Lucifer.

Maybe it's because of capitalism and fascism, but this concept has negative connotations because it has morphed into the belief that serving oneself means trying to achieve power and hurting those below you.

I think that's why people (non-Christians) are so scared of it.

I associate Satanism with violence and power, and think that those who call themselves that are maladjusted and angry.

Sean D. Schaffer
12-18-2006, 09:33 PM
Anyone here write about atheism (or secularism, or freethought, or rationalism, etc.)?

I've begun a book and several essays concerning atheism, and I'm wondering if anyone else has published anything similar and/or has any information on the best markets for this sort of work.

For instance, are certain secular magazines easier to get into than others? Which publishing houses (besides Prometheus (http://www.prometheusbooks.com/)) welcome submissions with an irreligious slant?

Thanks in advance. :)


I don't personally write from the atheist standpoint or about it, but I would like to make a comment, if I may.

First and foremost, I do not want anyone here to think I am trying to sway other people's beliefs, because that is not my intent. But I have seen part of the atheist vs. theist argument that started on this thread shortly after the OP, and I find it quite distasteful.

I personally believe in a G-d, but I do not believe in trying to proselytize someone to my faith on a board where faith is not even an issue. I believe that arguing against atheism where the original poster asked a simple question about publishers who accept secular, atheist viewpoints, is a bad thing.

Now before anyone gets mad at me, please understand I have not read all of this thread, but rather much of the first page. So understand that, if the discussion has changed, I am responding only to an attitude that atheism is somehow wrong on a thread devoted to atheism.

To the original question: I do not know what publishers would be specifically devoted to atheism, but I am sure a number of standard secular publishers, would at least be willing to welcome anything that would sell. Publishing, of course, is a business, and if a publisher accepts something written either from an atheist standpoint, or from a religious standpoint, it would be because of how well-written the work is, as well as how well-informed the writer is concerning their standpoint.

I hope this helps the OP to find what she's looking for. I wish you the very best with your endeavors.

benbradley
12-25-2006, 03:50 AM
For instance, are certain secular magazines easier to get into than others? Which publishing houses (besides Prometheus (http://www.prometheusbooks.com/)) welcome submissions with an irreligious slant?

Thanks in advance. :)

Here's a really small publisher accepting atheistic writings:

http://seesharppress.com
The "About Us" and "Submissions" links should tell you everything you need to know about them (or him - author Charles Bufe seems to be the main person running the place).

Cathy C
12-25-2006, 04:23 AM
I wonder if the mods would consider changing the name so that it reads something like "religious, spiritual and philosophical writing," so that non-religious people can gather here as well. I'll try PMing a few people to see if that can be done...

We decided against putting philosophy in the title since it might imply that philosophy could be construed to ONLY exist outside of Theistic beliefs--which isn't true, of course.

We are in the process of creating a philosophy discussion board, though. We're just deciding where to put it. :)

nancy02664
12-27-2006, 05:36 AM
Thank you, ben! I added that link to the list in the other thread. :)

Cathy, I see what you're saying. Good point.

Meerkat
12-27-2006, 08:08 PM
Not sure this will be of interest to you, but Atheist Alliance has a pretty big index of books (http://www.atheistalliance.org/books/index.php), some of which are fiction. I'm seeing Cypress House Press, Crossroad Publishing Company, Thomas Jefferson Press, Prometheus, and some others... might be publishers to keep in mind...


Thanks, I also appreciate these new avenues to check out!

Marian Perera
12-30-2006, 08:18 PM
Anyone here write about atheism (or secularism, or freethought, or rationalism, etc.)?

I'm on the last chapter of a fantasy novel where the main characters are a die-hard skeptic and a religious fundamentalist who have to work together. I like both of them, but since I'm an atheist, I felt far more in tune with the skeptic's mindset. Still, one thing I learned from writing this was to give just as much air time to the theist's point of view, to show that she was fully justified in her beliefs and to give her just as many chances to deliver a verbal smackdown as I gave the skeptic. It's actually easier to sympathize with a character who's not gloriously victorious in every argument.