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Bubastes
11-16-2006, 07:35 PM
NPR has been doing a series of Q&As with writers about how they write. I sometimes find myself annoyed after I read these because they seem to reinforce the "write all day in a coffeeshop" stereotype. Maybe it's just me, but I want to learn more about how other writers have juggled writing with their day jobs, just for a reality check (and a shot of hope). Anyone else have opinions one way or the other?

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6493914

Edit: I liked this article in Fast Company magazine about the "corporate literati."
http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/105/playbook-writers.html

Cav Guy
11-16-2006, 07:44 PM
But I also don't think that the writers they're profiling are necessarily "typical" by any stretch of the imagination. Of course they may fit the standard "writer profile," which may be what NPR's more interested in doing.;)

National Book Award finalists aren't exactly "typical," after all... And "the essence of noveling"? I thought I was writing, not noveling....now I'll have to have all my gilt-edged business cards redone...:D

KTC
11-16-2006, 07:47 PM
No comment, as of yet. But I am bookmarking the link for later. Looks interesting.

Freckles
11-16-2006, 08:15 PM
I haven't come across the NPR interviews, but thanks, Meow, for providing the link. Certainly some things to think about.

engmajor2005
11-17-2006, 01:36 AM
M. Brandon Robbins is a graphic novel reviewer, video game critic, and short story author. He is the author of an unpublished novel, Element Chilrd, and a chapbook of poetry entitled "A Party with the Grim Reaper."

How He Writes: Well, since I have eight hours a day taken up by the job that pays the bills (bane of amatuer writers everywhere), I write whenever I get a sweet, precious moment; usually on lunch, before work, and when everybody's gone to bed and nobody's going to shout "BRRAAANNNDDDOONN!!! CAN YOU TAKE OUT THE TRASH?" To make myself feel better, I carry around a little scratch pad and scribble down ideas or snippets I want to use; I usually write on my laptop (damn PC...just wait until I get a Mac!) but will write pen-to-paper when I want that feeling. I spent about an hour doing so in a Starbucks the other night. It was nice.

Writer's Block Remedy: Drink some tea, eat something, take a walk, go out with friends or family, watch a movie...stand still long enough and an idea will find you. When you are seized by an idea, put it down quick and get it going. Then, your block is gone.

A Favorite Sentence: Anything by Neil Gaiman drips of genius. As far as my own stuff, I don't have a favorite. Do parents pick favorite children? Okay, bad example. Sorry.

ATP
11-17-2006, 11:19 AM
Engmajor2005,

Could you please provide a link to that particular page you've copied?

ATP
11-17-2006, 11:35 AM
NPR has been doing a series of Q&As with writers about how they write.<snip> Anyone else have opinions one way or the other?<snip>
I liked this article in Fast Company magazine about the "corporate literati."
http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/105/playbook-writers.html (http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/105/playbook-writers.html)

From a full-time non-fiction writer:

Given that this article is from Fast Company magazine, it is perhaps no surprise that it mentions those in fast-paced, generally large organisations. 'Corporate literati' is just a fancy journalistic attempt at putting a spin on a demographic segment of those who have full-time jobs and write in their spare time - which generally takes in anyone from computer repairmen, electricians, factory workers, through to those in 'high-level' white collar jobs. Though, the idea of someone getting their employer to agree to two mornings a week writing on company time (for an approximate 25% pay cut) is quite amazing.

The thing you seem to be looking for is an idea of how others with
full-time jobs manage to find the time to do their writing, as Engmajor2005's example.

engmajor2005
11-20-2006, 08:14 PM
Engmajor2005,

Could you please provide a link to that particular page you've copied?

It was the standard template from the interviews found by following the link in the original post.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...toryId=6493914

Bubastes
11-22-2006, 07:58 PM
Today is Jodi Picoult's Q&A, and it's refreshing in its no-nonsense practicality:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6524058

Fights Writer's Block: "I don't. Writer's block is for people who have the luxury of time; I started writing when I had three kids under the age of 4. I used to write every ten minutes I got to sit in front of a computer. Now, when I have more time, I function the same way: if it's writing time, I write. I may write garbage, but you can always edit garbage. You can't edit a blank page.