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Becky Writes
11-10-2006, 07:26 AM
This is a sentence from my WIP.

This meeting could put a quick end to what was just getting started between her and Michael.


Is that right?

veronie
11-10-2006, 09:34 AM
Yes

I think my resoning here is correct, but I'll let someone correct me if it isn't. If you take out "Michael," you have "getting started between her." Obviously, "between" needs two objects here. So, to get a grasp on it, I think you would need to change it to "with" (in your mind, of course, to see what pronoun to use) instead of "between." Now the sentence reads: ... getting started with her. It definitely would not be "she." It would not be herself because that pronoun would imply it is only herself, not anyone else. That would exclude Michael from the start.

So, my conclusion is that the best pronoun is "her," just as you have it.

aghast
11-10-2006, 09:34 AM
id either write 'between them' or 'between michael and her' but its grammatically correct

ErylRavenwell
11-10-2006, 12:27 PM
Michael and her. Michael and her is the object. If it were the subject (before the passive voice verb), then you would have used she.

FennelGiraffe
11-10-2006, 11:40 PM
Yes, 'her' is correct. When a pronoun is the object of a preposition, that pronoun must be in the objective case. ('between' is a preposition, 'her and Michael' is its object, and 'her' is objective case)

I would, however, prefer 'Michael and her'. If you were writing in first person, it would be 'between Michael and me' because the speaker always comes last. To my ear, in this third person sentence, 'her' fills the same role as 'me'.

FloVoyager
11-11-2006, 03:43 AM
Her.

Maryn
11-11-2006, 05:16 PM
Another vote for her. And another reflection that I'm glad to have studied Latin, because much of English became clearer.

Maryn, who remembers little Latin now but retains the English lessons therein

JanDarby
11-11-2006, 11:57 PM
Personally, I'd go with "herself," since you're referring back to the same "her" as the subject of the sentence, but "her" is okay too. Definitely not "she." It's the object of a proposition.

JD

Fern
11-12-2006, 12:16 AM
This meeting could put a quick end to what was just getting started between her and Michael.


When something seems awkward to me, I tend to change the entire sentence. . .

"This meeting could put a quick end to what she had going with Michael."

"This meeting could put a quick end to what she had started with Michael."

There are all kinds of variations you could use to say the exact same thing.

ErylRavenwell
11-12-2006, 09:30 AM
I would rather replace "what was just getting started" by "burgeoning love affair" (if it is relevent, I'm guessing). "What" seems somewhat too vague.

This meeting could potentially put to a premature end the burgeoning love affair between Michael and Sarah.