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Angelus
11-10-2006, 06:42 AM
You write because you love it. That is all. It is simple. This has nothing to do with publishing or politics, or religion. Do you enjoy what you do? If your answer is no, then why? Did you fall in love with an idea? Or did you fall in love with a purpose? If you are not in love with the telling, the writing of tales, then there is no hope for you. Don't you understand? It is the story and the storyteller that are entwined, not "did that sentence make sense?" or "Do you like my character?" Did that sentence make sense to you, if it did, then it will make sense. If your character is likeable it is because you wrote it the way you wanted that character to be. Don't forget everyone who posts here can do this, can tell stories, sorry, if that is a disappointment. But that is what it is about. There is no better story teller. There are stories. You make them, create them, then do so. And you will. If you want to know how to write an action scene, then do it! Don't ask. Just do, and you will. I am not being harsh here, I just think that stories are meant to be told, tell them, but don't expect anything. We all feel things, loss and pain, and love and grief, we are a paradox, because we want to believe. Believe it. It will happen. And you are a grand bunch, and I have nothing but the highest esteem for you. Just be patient. You'll see.

veinglory
11-10-2006, 06:49 AM
Is this here for critique, because--if not--it is in the wrong place/

Bufty
11-11-2006, 02:14 AM
What point are you trying to make, Angelus?

That if one writes, what one writes will be read and interpreted by the reader in the same way as it is viewed by the writer?

That may be the belief of all who write, but without knowledge of the craft it is by no means a certainty.

If one is writing solely for one's own pleasure it matters not what others think, but if one is writing for publication there are readers, Agents and Publishers to be taken into account.

awatkins
11-11-2006, 02:18 AM
I'm confused about this post--it doesn't seem to belong here. I'll port it over to the Roundtable and everybody can take it from there. Let me know if this isn't the right place and I'll move it again if needed. :)

MajorDrums
11-11-2006, 02:23 AM
is the OP stemming from another thread/topic? i don't understand.

awatkins
11-11-2006, 02:25 AM
It was in Other--Share Your Work. I think we're all kind of confused, but perhaps the OP will come along and clarify what he/she meant.

Tallymark
11-11-2006, 02:47 AM
Its true, anybody can tell a story, and all of us are here to tell a story--but most of us are also here to write a book. And telling a story and writing a book are, in a way, two different things, though not mutually exclusive--you can't write a book without telling a story (unless of course its nonfiction!), but you can certainly tell a story without writing a book. And while we all want to write straight from the heart without filtering anything, if we want to turn our stories into books, then I'm afraid we have to follow the rules. Sometimes this can be stifling, but in the end the rules are there for a good reason--they make sure that the book is readable and clear to someone other than, well, yourself. It's the price one pays to share their story with others. And I'm sure happier when I pick up a book that the grammar is correct and a scene makes sense to me the way it ought to, even if the writer had done it differently at first. It unfortunately isn't true that if you write something that makes sense to you, everyone else will understand it--everyone else has different experiences (and everyone else doesn't have the original idea in their head).

We're all here because we love writing, but one doesn't need a messageboard to enjoy writing (heck, I'd probably get more writing done if I spent less time here!). But this messageboard *is* good for helping us turn stories into novels. Nevertheless, I do believe it is important to have a passion for what one writes about. ^_^

Unique
11-11-2006, 02:52 AM
Some of us came here because we lost our passion. I stayed because I enjoy the company.

I write because I want to and I do it when I want to. No other reason.
What's your reason?

JennaGlatzer
11-11-2006, 02:53 AM
You write because you love it.

Actually, I write because I have a mortgage.

I love my family, and my cat. I love getting massages, and Boston Market brownies, and Indigo Girls music. I like writing; I don't necessarily love it. But it's how I choose to make my living, and I get satisfaction from it.

Rolling Thunder
11-11-2006, 03:13 AM
I'm glad I bought a new bottle of Canadian Gold today. After a few drinks I'm sure it will make sense to me.;)

Christine N.
11-11-2006, 03:13 AM
Loving writing means you want it to be the best that you can make it. And that means worrying about things characterization and plot. You want to see it in print, that means worrying about sentence structure and grammar and the business of publishing.

Just saying "I wrote this and I love it, so the world will love it too" is just not realistic.

Some days I love it, some days I don't. I am fortunate to be paid well at something writing related. I hope to be paid enough that it is my only occupation, and will give me the freedom to write my own stuff. I'm grateful that my work is well-thought enough to be in print.

Loving it, as they say, isn't always enough.

icerose
11-11-2006, 03:39 AM
And this came out of nowhere.

I just love that whooshing sound things make when they fly over my head.

Bartholomew
11-11-2006, 03:59 AM
I see what the OP is saying, but I have no idea why he chose to make it into a post.

Angelus: yes, empassioned writers will produce passionate work. But without honing their skills-- examining sentences, paragraphs and scenes --they'll never improve. That's like saying Santana could pick up a guitar and play masterfully without ever learning anything first.

RG570
11-11-2006, 04:13 AM
That's like saying Santana could pick up a guitar and play masterfully without ever learning anything first.

Ah, I always thought that's exactly what Santana did.

Actually, the Santana thing more illustrates the original poster's sentiments. There you have a man who essentially plays the same hackneyed licks over and over again but does it with enough passion to pass it off as masterful playing.

Sometimes that's all you need, I guess. But for most of us I think technical ability is necessary to make anything worthwhile.

KTC
11-11-2006, 04:24 AM
I appreciate the enthusiasm of the original post...but not the demand of the poster to impose their will on all writers everywhere. I write for something to do. I do love writing, yes. But I have no idea what you're going on about, to tell you the truth. I am not waiting for anything. I don't need to be patient. I don't expect anything. I'm not misunderstanding anything. I write to write. I get to buy a lot of nice extras too...since I get paid for my writing but it's not my way of paying the mortgage or living expenses.

I tell stories to tell stories. blah, blah, blah. You don't have to post here to tell stories. This is a strange post sent into the universe with nothing stuck to it as a point of reference. Maybe you can elaborate what you were trying to get across...because I don't often find myself in the dark.

triceretops
11-11-2006, 04:41 AM
Well, that's akin to what Yoda might tell us, "Do not think. Do." We have James Richie to tell us such things, and masterfully, I might add. This is a writer's group where we are allowed, inclined, to share ALL of our feelings regarding this most stressful and difficult profession. It's wrought with dangers, toils, and snares. We're not wussies or chronic bitchers. We're working, but we're sharing our experiences. That helps with positive reinforcement.

However, I do appreciate the positive thrust, if that is what it was meant to be.

Tri

dahmnait
11-11-2006, 04:57 AM
I wrote brilliantly at 10, I write brilliantly now. ;)

Publishing, money, writing for a living aside, I do write for myself. I also edit for myself. I want my work to be at its best, and since I don't know everything, ::gasp:: I ask for help. Additionally, my writing grows stronger by reading others' works and critiques.

Wow, I just realized how selfish I am.

Bartholomew
11-11-2006, 05:19 AM
Ah, I always thought that's exactly what Santana did.

Actually, the Santana thing more illustrates the original poster's sentiments. There you have a man who essentially plays the same hackneyed licks over and over again but does it with enough passion to pass it off as masterful playing.

Sometimes that's all you need, I guess. But for most of us I think technical ability is necessary to make anything worthwhile.

And of course Santana never had feedback from other guitar players (ever,) and always played perfectly.

Medievalist
11-11-2006, 05:26 AM
You write because you love it.

Actually, no, no I don't.

I hate to write. I loathe it. I am not biologically designed to write, in fact, writing is one of the most difficult things I do.

I write because they make me (for school) or, more often, because they pay me.

But I don't love writing, and never have.

veinglory
11-11-2006, 05:48 AM
.

stormie
11-11-2006, 06:27 AM
I'm sitting here with my peppermint schnapps on ice. I just finished writing about 3,000 words. I have a revision on a novel to make within a set amount of time. I can do it. Do I love writing, my writing? Yup. Especially when I receive that check in the mail.

Each person's purpose is unique to themselves.
Sounds good to me.

popmuze
11-11-2006, 07:05 AM
Do I love writing, my writing? Yup. Especially when I receive that check in the mail.

I think this is the point of my previous thread. There's a basic thing that happens to you--and your writing--when you start to get paid. No matter how blissful (or blissfully ignorant) you may have been during your amatuer days, it's very hard to go back to that state once you get used to being a professional.

That said, I'm definitely among my own top ten favorite writers.

victoriastrauss
11-11-2006, 07:56 AM
No matter how blissful (or blissfully ignorant) you may have been during your amatuer days, it's very hard to go back to that state once you get used to being a professional.I think it's impossible. Becoming a professional changes everything, and not all of that change is for the better.

I love writing. I also hate it. Right now, it's mostly hate.

- Victoria

veinglory
11-11-2006, 07:58 AM
I gave everyone the point 3 posts ago... why are we still talking ;)

Angelus
11-11-2006, 08:14 AM
All I was saying is don't worry, you all have talent. That is it. Sorry, if it sounded like I was dictating to everyone. I do not understand why anyone would do this if they didn't love it. Writing is a very shaky business if you are thinking about making money doing it. If you can, great! I guess I was trying to give a pep talk that was inappropriate. I apologize. I just think there is a lot of talent here. I didn't tell anyone, Hey, you suck! Because I don't think that. Maybe I am talking to myself. Maybe I need the pep talk. It was meant in kindness, not judgment. Sorry, that it went so awry.

icerose
11-11-2006, 08:43 AM
Well when you label it "All of You Are Missing The Point" it comes down as a lecture and you began midrant with zero explanation that left at least me saying "huh?"

Your entire post looked like it belonged in response to another post and here it was floating in the ocean all by it's lonesome.

Bartholomew
11-11-2006, 09:21 AM
I gave everyone the point 3 posts ago... why are we still talking ;)

Har. Har. Har.

:tongue

Unique
11-11-2006, 04:11 PM
I gave everyone the point 3 posts ago... why are we still talking ;)

Because we're writers and we talk with our fingers?

MacAllister
11-11-2006, 04:24 PM
Because we're writers and we talk with our fingers?
Uh huh. And out our asse...ummm... hats.

Rolling Thunder
11-11-2006, 04:28 PM
Well, you have to admit. As a 'hook' it sure did get a good discussion going.

johnzakour
11-11-2006, 05:47 PM
Sorry to keep this going but I had to tap in.

I once had a medical doctor friend tell me, I love being a doctor so much Id do it even if I wasnt paid. Not sure how valid her statement is but it got me thinking. I enjoy being a writer. I enjoy the freedom it gives me to stay at home with my son. I enjoy having people stop me on the street or at conferences saying how much they enjoy my comics or cant wait for the next book.

The bottom line is, if I didnt get paid, as much as I enjoy writing I would have to fine a new line of work and Im not sure I would continue to write for fun.

(Okay, maybe a would do a weekly web comic for free but that would be it.)

CBeasy
11-11-2006, 06:13 PM
Your mom is missing the point.
:Shrug:
Oh wait, what thread is this? Where am I?

In all honesty, I don't think there's a writer here that doesn't adore the craft. Isn't that how we all found this place? Being that we very rarely make a living from it, and yet spend all our free time either writing our WIPs, or participating in a forum about writing, I don't see how our love is in question.

johnnysannie
11-11-2006, 09:09 PM
You write because you love it. That is all.


I do write because I love it but that is far from all. In that, you are much mistaken.

I write because it is something that I do well and my skill with words has allowed me to earn my living with words for many years. Long before I was a freelancer, my writing skills earned my living from the time I received my second college degree.

I write because it is a career that allows me to work at home, to be available for my three children, to live where I chose, to avoid a daily commute, and to not answer to a boss.

And there are times when I hate it, times when a deadline is a crunch to make, when I don't like the edits, when payment is late, when I have to write despite personal events such as a death in the family, and I don't like revision work as well as the first flow of creation.

There is no "perfect" job but writing serves me better than many other careers, some of which I have tried in the distant past.

veinglory
11-11-2006, 09:14 PM
I love each book for about the first 8000 words, from then on in it tends to be gettting published that motivates me to finished the darned thing.

popmuze
11-11-2006, 10:04 PM
I gave everyone the point 3 posts ago... why are we still talking ;)


If the point is "I've been reviewed!" I'm with you on that one.

(Positively, I hope).

SeanDSchaffer
11-11-2006, 10:06 PM
You write because you love it. That is all. It is simple. This has nothing to do with publishing or politics, or religion.

I think I will decide for myself why I write.

I do indeed write because I love it; but I also write because I want to make a living at it. There's something to be said for the fulfillment of getting paid for my hard work over the last 24 years.


Do you enjoy what you do? If your answer is no, then why? Did you fall in love with an idea? Or did you fall in love with a purpose? If you are not in love with the telling, the writing of tales, then there is no hope for you.

I've seen many writers here say that they do not enjoy writing, but that rather they enjoy getting the bills paid, getting food on their tables, etc. Do not ever be so presumptuous as to think that you know why other people write. You don't, so don't try to explain to everyone else why they write.


Don't you understand? It is the story and the storyteller that are entwined, not "did that sentence make sense?" or "Do you like my character?"

If the sentence does not make sense, and if readers do not like the characters, they won't read the book.


Did that sentence make sense to you, if it did, then it will make sense. If your character is likeable it is because you wrote it the way you wanted that character to be.

Again, mistaken. Not everyone is exactly the same. Just because you like your work does not mean the reader will enjoy it also.


Don't forget everyone who posts here can do this, can tell stories, sorry, if that is a disappointment.

I have a friend who can tell a story in three paragraphs. His grammar is horrid; his spelling atrocious; yet he is capable of telling a story. This does not make his writing publishable. It merely means he can understand what he has written.


But that is what it is about. There is no better story teller.

This is why so many people have ghostwriters do their works for them. No, there are people who cannot tell a story worth a darn; it's up to them to see this and improve upon their Craft. Neither your words nor mine, are golden.


There are stories. You make them, create them, then do so. And you will.

Will it be publishable, however? Just writing a story does not make you a good author. It takes work, and plenty of it, to make yourself the best writer you can be.


If you want to know how to write an action scene, then do it! Don't ask. Just do, and you will.

I once held this attitude, before I knew anything about the business. The problem with this idea is that the author is not generally an expert in certain actions. How to write an action scene is of high importance, if you want your work to be believable. If you want people to read your book without throwing it across the room, then you have to be intelligent in the way you write. You don't just write something and expect everything to work. That is not the way things happen in the real world.


I am not being harsh here, I just think that stories are meant to be told, tell them, but don't expect anything.

If you have no expectations for your stories, then why write them in the first place? If you want to be read, that is an expectation. If you want to get paid for your work, that is an expectation. One writer is not the judge of the whole publishing or writing industry. You write for the sake of the reader's enjoyment. It is the reader that makes or breaks you.


We all feel things, loss and pain, and love and grief, we are a paradox, because we want to believe. Believe it. It will happen.

If you believe that when walking into a dark room filled with black widow spiders, you are not going to get bit, you're going to be in for a shock. Belief does not make something happen. Faith does not make things come to pass. There are works that accompany that faith and belief. If you believe a bus is going to take you to a particular place, but you don't get on that bus, it won't take you anywhere. You have to step onto the bus and pay the fare; then it will take you where you need to go.


And you are a grand bunch, and I have nothing but the highest esteem for you.

And what I say to you in this post is out of nothing but respect for you as a writer. Like the Bible says, "Faithful are the wounds of a friend, but the kisses of the enemy are deceit". I speak this rebuke not in disrespect, but in the highest of respect for my fellow writer. If you want to be a writer, improving your Craft and becoming the best you can be is of paramount importance.


Just be patient. You'll see.

I always try to be patient, especially when waiting on an agent or an editor to decide whether or not my work passes muster. Good luck to you.

popmuze
11-11-2006, 10:10 PM
If the point is "I've been reviewed!" I'm with you on that one.

Whoops! Looks like my eyes are going faster than my fingers. Your actual comment is "I've been renewed."

As nice as that is, I'd rather be reviewed.

Cathy C
11-12-2006, 12:44 AM
You write because you love it. That is all. It is simple.

Actually, not all of us do love it, as Medievalist said. I happen to be GOOD at writing, but I don't love it. It's a job. I enjoy it, it's pleasurable, but I could easily stop tomorrow and never touch the keyboard again. Now, I LOVE law and still enjoy reading a court decision like reading a thriller/suspense novel. I can never give that up.

For me, writing has its ups and downs and, like Victoria, since I started to do it professionally, it's not nearly as much fun. And yet, it's infinitely MORE fun than when I was writing for free, because I'm getting better at it and I'm discovering more about the process. It's a strange profession, this writing thing. :)

Scarlett_156
11-12-2006, 01:17 AM
Buh...? ??

janetbellinger
11-12-2006, 01:21 AM
Well, I agree people mostly write because they love to but there is more to it than just interacting with the story and characters while writing. After you've finished doing that, the real work begins, with countless revisions and asking those questions you say we don't need to ask ourselves such as "Does this sentence make sense?" I first wrote my current novel in 2002 and I have revised ti so many times, I've lost count. But I consider revision to be one of the most creative parts of the writing process, because then you get to think Does this or that work and if not, why? You try different things, knowing if it doesn't work you can always scrap it and go back to the original structure.

Medievalist
11-12-2006, 01:21 AM
All I was saying is don't worry, you all have talent. That is it. Sorry, if it sounded like I was dictating to everyone. I do not understand why anyone would do this if they didn't love it. Writing is a very shaky business if you are thinking about making money doing it.

No, no it's not; if you're in the right fields, writing is a very steady income.

Writing fiction is a bit tricky in terms of a steady income, but it's quite quite doable.

triceretops
11-12-2006, 01:42 AM
I'm in it for the fame, friends and eight-by-tens. After that happens, I'll tell you if I love it or not.

tri

wordmonkey
11-12-2006, 02:58 AM
I'm in it for the immortality!

I have an ISBN, in the Library of Congress! My book will live long after my Earthly demise, yet I'll live forever now.

FOREVER, I tell you!

FOREVER!!

BWAH HA HA HA HA HAR!!

They called me insane, Igor! But who's laughing now? Who's insane now?

BWAH HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HAR!!

:crazy:

K1P1
11-12-2006, 04:04 AM
Personally, I get tired of the assumption that everyone writes fiction. I don't. I don't have a story to be in love with. I don't have characters for anyone, inclulding myself, to like or dislike. I don't have a point to prove. I'm not in love with an idea.

But, I do have a love for well-turned phrases, for how-to instructions that you could read aloud as poetry if you wanted to, for precisely written economical prose, and for recognizable narrative voices.

Some parts of writing give me pleasure. Some parts of writing are a real pain. If you're a professional, you go ahead and write regardless. As a professional writer, I don't embark on a large project without a contract. So, yes, I'm in it for the money. As an amateur (in the literal sense of the word) I write essays and poetry when I feel like it.

The dictatorial assumption that we're all angst-filled unappreciated writers of fiction is extremely annoying. Not that I can't be an angst-filled writer of non-fiction. I spent all day being an angst-filled about chapter 3 of my book. :)

popmuze
11-12-2006, 08:50 AM
I'm in it for the immortality! My book will live long after my Earthly demise, yet I'll live forever now. FOREVER, I tell you!:crazy:


As Bob Dylan tells one of the characters in my latest book, "Art is long and life is short...but in your case it might be vice-versa."

Celia Cyanide
11-13-2006, 07:49 AM
I do not understand why anyone would do this if they didn't love it.

I think that people already explained this to you before you came back and posted again.

I don't love writing. It can be very difficult, and damned annoying, actually. I do it because I like when I get something good out of it, but the process sucks, at least for me.

If I wanted to "love" writing, I could do that any time I wanted. I took a community ed class, and wrote stories, and everyone in the class had wonderful things to say about them, and nothing negative. That was very nice. I could keep doing that. Or I could take a chance and show it to someone who might tell me it isn't perfect. That some of it totally sucks. That it needs to be rewritten. I do not love to hear that. So at the end of the day, I can write inside my confort zone all I want, or I can step outside my confort zone, and maybe learn something and become a better writer.

aruna
11-13-2006, 11:05 AM
The dictatorial assumption that we're all angst-filled unappreciated writers of fiction is extremely annoying.

That was my reaction too - and I DO write fiction. I do not need a lecture or a pep-talk. It might notbe intended but that was how it sounded - what with that heading, and all.

ATP
11-13-2006, 05:28 PM
Personally, I get tired of the assumption that everyone writes fiction. I don't. I don't have a story to be in love with. I don't have characters for anyone, inclulding myself, to like or dislike. I don't have a point to prove. I'm not in love with an idea.

As a full-time non-fiction writer, I concur.



Some parts of writing give me pleasure. Some parts of writing are a real pain. If you're a professional, you go ahead and write regardless. As a professional writer, I don't embark on a large project without a contract. So, yes, I'm in it for the money. As an amateur (in the literal sense of the word) I write essays and poetry when I feel like it.

Absolutely, with the added proviso that one oughtn't to begin any work without a contract.And, it is the money that pays the bills, puts food on the table, and allows me to get out of the apartment a little during the weekend, and sometimes during the week. No time for indulging the fiction writer's pursuits...which, if they are done at all, are usually left for 'after hours'. Not for nothing is the general description of a full-time non-fiction writer as 'working writer';) .



The dictatorial assumption that we're all angst-filled unappreciated writers of fiction is extremely annoying. Not that I can't be an angst-filled writer of non-fiction. I spent all day being an angst-filled about chapter 3 of my book. :)

Yes...but the question arises as to whether there is a qualitative difference between the angst of the non-fiction writer vs. the angst of the fiction writer?:) Hmmmm....

Sliding Otter
11-13-2006, 06:31 PM
I have worked as a psychologist for thirty five years helping people examine their lives individually, as couples and as families. I started writing short stories for my own amusement. Then I got to writing a newsletter for my psychology practice as a marketing tool. They I realized I had learned some things druing the course of my practice and started writing a regular newspaper column on what I had learned. Next I wrote two books which I self published. In the process, I discovered that I have much to learn, especially about marketing. Now I am working on a book for teens and have decided to approach the traditional publishing world for a spot on the shelves. I am struggling with the balance between having something useful to say and producing a product which will fly off the shelves. It seems to me that publishers and agents are more interested in the latter than the former. Maybe I have been naive and it is just a greater challenge that I thought. Has anyone else faced this dilemma and if so what have you discovered about yourself in the process?

icerose
11-13-2006, 07:01 PM
It seems to me that publishers and agents are more interested in the latter than the former. Maybe I have been naive and it is just a greater challenge that I thought. Has anyone else faced this dilemma and if so what have you discovered about yourself in the process?

At the end of the day publishing is a business and they buy what they think will sell, although a few editors will go to bat for books that they are convinced will not do very well but are so well written that they want to publish them.

But for the most part they go where the money is or they would quickly go out of business.

Scarlett_156
11-13-2006, 07:05 PM
Thanks for the advice, Ma!

K1P1
11-13-2006, 07:49 PM
I am struggling with the balance between having something useful to say and producing a product which will fly off the shelves. It seems to me that publishers and agents are more interested in the latter than the former. Maybe I have been naive and it is just a greater challenge that I thought. Has anyone else faced this dilemma and if so what have you discovered about yourself in the process?

That life is a series of compromises. :)

The answer, to my way of thinking, is to do your best on both counts. Write the best book you can write, always keeping your audience in mind. If you don't connect with the reader, then your book isn't as good as it could be. Work with a publisher with good distribution and a dedicated sales department that actually gets books into stores and promotes it through the distribution chain. If there are no publishers interested in your book then it may be that they don't see a way to market it. Think creatively about how to repackage your concept to make it more appealing. The beauty of non-fiction writing is that you can sell based on a proposal, so that you don't have to put the work into writing the book until after you have a contract.

janetbellinger
11-13-2006, 10:02 PM
I have discovered in the process that I cannot write for the market unless it is a genre I'm interested in. I wouldn't try to write Sci Fi for example, because it just doesn't interest me and even if I were willing to try, my lack of enthusiasm would come through. I believe if we write well enough there will be a reputable publisher out there for us.

ChunkyC
11-14-2006, 02:17 AM
Cool discussion, peeps. I write because I like the process and the end result, but also because I want to be considered a good writer by my peers and readers.

So far, I have achieved some recognition as a decent writer by those who read my movie review column, but I'll always wonder if it's what I'm saying they find enjoyable as opposed to how I say it. By that I mean; when I say I like a movie they like, is that why they like my column? Do they even notice how I said it? Do they notice the varied cadence of the sentence structure, the clever alliteration dropped in like a pinch of spice, the correct usage of the semi-colon?

Not likely. That's where the opinions of my peers comes in.

But it all comes down to being read. I want to see my byline in the paper, I want to see my name on the cover of a novel someday, I want these words to outlive me so that after I am gone someone somewhere might pick up a book or archived newspaper, read what I wrote and smile. I could die happy knowing that was a possibility.

But that's just me. :)

janetbellinger
11-14-2006, 04:38 AM
Actually, that isn't true about science fiction. When I first wrote Rain, I placed it partly in the future, up to 2005. I rewrote it all in the past and present because I just didn't want to have to come up with futuristic technology.


I have discovered in the process that I cannot write for the market unless it is a genre I'm interested in. I wouldn't try to write Sci Fi for example, because it just doesn't interest me and even if I were willing to try, my lack of enthusiasm would come through. I believe if we write well enough there will be a reputable publisher out there for us.

Cav Guy
11-15-2006, 06:20 PM
People, in my view, write for as many reasons as there are writers. I write both fiction and non-fiction, and have different reasons for writing both (and different relationships with that writing, but that's a thread for a six pack or two...). With my non-fiction it's often to get paid to or share some knowledge or information that I found interesting. With my fiction it's more a case of me wanting to expand on something I might have stumbled across in my non-fiction research or to bring a character I developed for gaming to life. I really don't think there's one true reason for writing, and I also don't think there's a "right" or "wrong" reason for writing. It's like any job...some days you love it and other days you hate it but know you have to go anyway and put in the time and effort.

Personally I'm cycling through one of my "hate" periods with my writing, at least in fiction.

Sliding Otter
11-17-2006, 12:36 AM
Hi Cav Guy,

Your post was astute and honest. I agree that all writers have their own motivations for writing and that the same writer has different motivations at different times. I feel fortunate to be able to write without needing the money. That's not to say I couldn't find a use for it. I started writing because it was something that I didn't need to do but wanted to. There are times I feel more like writing than I do at other times, times when the writing comes easier and times when I feel compelled to write. I guess writing reflects the full range of a writer's emotions. I am happy for the outlet.

Joe

Sliding Otter
11-17-2006, 09:19 PM
That life is a series of compromises. :)

If there are no publishers interested in your book then it may be that they don't see a way to market it. Think creatively about how to repackage your concept to make it more appealing.

Maggie, thanks, I think you are right. I have gotten some good feedback about my writing style and have come to realize that the intended audience for my current project is probably too small to excite agents or publishers. I am working on restyling it to make it appeal to a larger audience.

Joe

Cat Scratch
11-18-2006, 12:15 AM
I do write because I love it. I also happen to want to be paid to do it, and no one will pay me if they don't understand my sentences. Believe it or not, writing is something that must be learned. We don't pop out of the womb understanding sentence structure.

Carrie in PA
11-18-2006, 01:07 AM
So far, I have achieved some recognition as a decent writer by those who read my movie review column, but I'll always wonder if it's what I'm saying they find enjoyable as opposed to how I say it. By that I mean; when I say I like a movie they like, is that why they like my column? Do they even notice how I said it? Do they notice the varied cadence of the sentence structure, the clever alliteration dropped in like a pinch of spice, the correct usage of the semi-colon?

Not likely. That's where the opinions of my peers comes in.

Of course they like how you're saying what you're saying. Otherwise, they wouldn't stay interested enough to read the whole column, let alone your next one. Of course, they're probably not breaking it down into "I really like his use of metaphors" or "wow, that Chunky really knows how to use punctuation!" LOL - but they're obviously enjoying how you're writing.

If your style sucked, if you were dry and bland, it wouldn't matter what you were saying, people wouldn't read it. People know what they like, even if they can't articulate it.

I get comments on my column all the time, and it's usually "I feel like you're sitting right there talking to me" type comments. The subject matter is almost secondary.

rhymegirl
11-18-2006, 08:02 PM
I think this is an interesting topic.

I've read some of your posts. Jenna said something about liking writing, but not sure if she loves it. Interesting.

I was thinking about some of this the other day. Every time I am called upon to write an article for the newspaper I do the reporting and then I procrastinate when it comes to the writing part. Why? Good question. I guess it's because I always question myself, I always question whether I can pull it off or not. It is similar to how I felt when I was in college taking an art class. We were supposed to draw some vases which were displayed on a table in front of us. Learning about perspective. I froze every time my pencil tried to touch the paper. The art teacher walked over to me and said, "You've got to put SOMETHING on the paper."

And that's what it's all about. You've got to put something on the paper when you're a writer, too. I had been afraid that whatever I drew on that paper wouldn't be quite right, wouldn't be perfect. So I was afraid to draw anything.

And when I write I feel that way, too. What if I can't convey what it is I want to convey. I know as a newspaper writer I have to get the facts right. I have to spell names correctly. I have to explain things in such a way that the readers will understand.

And so, after procrastinating for a while, I finally sit down and put some words down. And then some more words come. And more. And before I know it, the story is written. And I tell myself, "You did it! What the heck were you afraid of?"

So do I love writing or merely like it? I love it when all the words come together right and I've written a good piece. I hate it when I'm struggling to find the right words or they just don't fit together right like pieces in a jigsaw puzzle.

But I must at least like it somewhat because I do it every day. Even if it's just posting here on AW. It's still putting words down on the screen that someone will read.

It's nice to get paid for your writing. But it's also nice to put those jigsaw pieces together in just the right way and make a beautiful puzzle.

Serenity
11-18-2006, 10:12 PM
I do love writing. I may not be the best at it, but I do love it, and I'm continually learning. The book that Chaos and I have written and the one that we are currently co-writing have been two of the best experiences of my life. It would be a shame not to share that with others. Will it get published? Can't say, but I sure as hell hope so because I love the story and I love the characters.

scarletpeaches
11-18-2006, 10:15 PM
I write because I love it. I love it so much I'd do it all the time if I could. This, unfortunately, would leave me no time to earn rent-and-groceries money, so the only solution is to earn the money I need while doing what I love. Hence my desire for publication.

Cav Guy
11-19-2006, 08:35 PM
I do write because I love it. I also happen to want to be paid to do it, and no one will pay me if they don't understand my sentences. Believe it or not, writing is something that must be learned. We don't pop out of the womb understanding sentence structure.

This is closer to the relationship I have with my non-fiction, which has been the more successful thus far (four articles and a game supplement, with another article pending with a major magazine in its genre) than my fiction. I have to admit I write my fiction more for myself, although being published there would be nice as well.

I don't write to support myself, which is a darned good thing if you think about it. There is a certain amount of writing involved with my day job, some of which is highly specific and technical.

Do I love writing? Now that's a tougher question. I've been doing it long enough in one form or another that I don't even think about it in those terms anymore. I notice when I don't do it, and there are times when I go through what might be considered withdrawl if I don't do it. But I also do a fair amount of role-playing (the old pencil and paper kind, not online stuff or computer games), and in many ways that is the same as writing on the fly. It's possible that it's just become such a part of me that I don't notice it sometimes.