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View Full Version : Should I keep waiting for a reponse?



torrentwaters
11-09-2006, 12:42 PM
Okay, about 15 months ago I sent out a query letter. I know your wondering why did you send a follow up letter at some point? Well honestly I forgot I sent it out. 3 months ago I got a reply asking for the complete ms. Which I sent out. After a month I sent a follow up letter. The reply said it was in the high priority folder, but she'd get to it when she had time. So I'm still waiting. Now I'm being to wonder if I should pull it or just continue waiting. Also is this a normal time line for submissions?

Tracy
11-09-2006, 02:37 PM
The 15 months seems a bit long, but now that the agent is back in touch, however, the one month (or more now) isn't too long. If you get another agent in the meantime, you can write to her and tell her so, otherwise leave it with her - why would you pull it?

But what do you mean, "continue waiting"? Have you not queried other agents in the meantime? Are you not writing your next novel? Keep moving yourself, doing what you need to do as a writer. It's not like tennis where they have to lob the ball back before you can hit it again!

Shadow_Ferret
11-09-2006, 05:03 PM
Yes, erase the 15 months from you memory. You're starting fresh and it's only been 3 months (or however long since you sent out the ms.).

Relax and go on to something else.

Carrie in PA
11-09-2006, 07:41 PM
Ditto Ferret.

I would look at it as starting from the time they requested the ms (or when you mailed it to them). Good luck!

victoriastrauss
11-09-2006, 07:50 PM
A couple of issues here.

First, the 12-month period between query and request. That's awfully long, and suggests, at the very least, an agency or publisher that's seriously overstocked. I would not be terribly confident about a company that took so long to respond to queries.

Second, the request for the full manuscript. There are always exceptions, but in general, a reputable agent or editor will ask for a partial first. People who ask for the whole ms. right away are often inexperienced, or else they plan to ask you for money and don't want to waste time by messing around with partials. I'm not saying this is always the case--but unless you're absolutely certain that the agent or publisher is reputable (i.e., a track record of sales for an agent, books in bookstores for a publisher), an immediate request for a full ms. should ring at least a small warning bell.

So do be cautious about this agent or publisher. And in the meantime, keep submitting.

- Victoria

Freckles
11-09-2006, 11:28 PM
If you follow-up again, I'd ask for a firm deadline of when she could get back to you.

In the meantime, you could look into other places in case this one doesn't pan out.

torrentwaters
11-10-2006, 03:23 AM
Thanks guys. Guess I should of mentioned that I've been working on other stuff since then. Actually I've had three short stories published with a diff pub.


Second, the request for the full manuscript. There are always exceptions, but in general, a reputable agent or editor will ask for a partial first. People who ask for the whole ms. right away are often inexperienced, or else they plan to ask you for money and don't want to waste time by messing around with partials. I'm not saying this is always the case--but unless you're absolutely certain that the agent or publisher is reputable (i.e., a track record of sales for an agent, books in bookstores for a publisher), an immediate request for a full ms. should ring at least a small warning bell.
- Victoria
Victoria when I sent in the querie letter I also sent in a partial. But I'll keep what you said in mind for my next ms.


If you follow-up again, I'd ask for a firm deadline of when she could get back to you.


Can you do that? I mean will they actually give you a frim deadline as to when they'll get back to you? I've just never heard of a newbie writer doing that.

Freckles
11-10-2006, 03:36 AM
Hey Torrent --

About giving them a deadline: you don't have to be rude about it. When I query people or follow-up, I always say in the letter something along the lines of: "If I don't hear back from you by X, then I'll assume you've elected to pass on my manuscript." Then make sure to thank them for their time and consideration.

:)

torrentwaters
11-10-2006, 12:45 PM
Okay thanks Freckles when I send in my next follow up letter, which will be here soon, I'll do that.