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BottomlessCup
11-01-2006, 06:49 AM
There must be one.

There's 'mucus', but that's more a term for 'snot', which is not the same as a booger. Snot is the runny nose stuff. I suppose a booger is made of snot, but not all snot is a booger.

Anybody know? It's very important.

poetinahat
11-01-2006, 06:52 AM
I don't care what you're researching this topic for, B-Cup. But I must read it. Gimme your PayPal details.

BottomlessCup
11-01-2006, 06:56 AM
:D

When it's done.

Tornadoboy
11-01-2006, 04:51 PM
I'm not sure, but when I pick one out, I'll let you know :D

Ok ok seriously, how about "congealed nasal excretion?"

yuck.

C.bronco
11-01-2006, 05:32 PM
phlegm

smallthunder
11-01-2006, 06:09 PM
I just had to give this one a snot ... er, I mean, give this one a SHOT ...

How about: "viscid nasal mucus?"

smallthunder
11-01-2006, 06:15 PM
phlegm

This isn't too far off, but the medical dictionary I checked doesn't link phlegm to the finger-picking nose -- but associates it with the lungs.

I had better stop now, eh what?

wordmonkey
11-01-2006, 06:37 PM
Crusty nose goblins

kikazaru
11-01-2006, 06:45 PM
Nostril detritus?

Or according to my kids "snot rockets" - when you sneeze and they shoot out your nose like a couple of scud missles.

It's a good thing I'm dieting because I've just put myself off breakfast.:(

Ol' Fashioned Girl
11-01-2006, 06:57 PM
This thread should be used as an example when people say, "You know, there's absolutely nothing you can't learn at Absolute Write."

Ol' Fashioned Girl
11-01-2006, 07:02 PM
Okay, I confess. After reading all the entries in the thread, I went to look it up. This is what the online thesaurus had to say:

booger: n. Slang: dried nasal mucus; Slang: An item that is unnamed or unnameable...

But the funniest part of the page was the ad at the top from dealtime.com:

"Looking for booger? Compare products, prices and stores!"

smallthunder
11-01-2006, 07:52 PM
But the funniest part of the page was the ad at the top from dealtime.com:

"Looking for booger? Compare products, prices and stores!"

That's tooooo much!

:ROFL:

JustinThorne
11-01-2006, 07:54 PM
Hmmm, nothing like a topic on mining for green gold...

How about 'crust'?

JD65
11-01-2006, 09:14 PM
A booger by any other name would not pick the same...

It's actually called a "rhinolith" [rhino = nose; lith = stone]

C.bronco
11-01-2006, 09:24 PM
nose goblins

Doug Johnson
11-01-2006, 09:26 PM
If Pulitzer Prize winner Dave Barry uses "booger" I think it's OK for you to use.

eldragon
11-01-2006, 09:48 PM
I feel sick.

C.bronco
11-01-2006, 09:51 PM
Sorry to hear it. Are you congested?

smallthunder
11-01-2006, 10:12 PM
A booger by any other name would not pick the same...

It's actually called a "rhinolith" [rhino = nose; lith = stone]

Nope -- that ain't no booger.

A simple Google search shows that:

Rhinoliths are rare. They are calcareous concretions that are formed by the deposition of salts on an intranasal foreign body. The foreign body, which acts as the nucleus for encrustation, can be either endogenous or exogenous. Dessicated blood clots, ectopic teeth, and bone fragments are examples of endogenous matter. Exogenous materials include fruit seeds, plant material, beads, cotton wool, and dental impression material.



Although the pathogenesis remains unclear; a number of factors are thought to be involved in the formation of rhinoliths. These include entry and impaction of a foreign body in the nasal cavity, acute and chronic inflammation, obstruction and stagnation of nasal secretions, and precipitation of mineral salts. Development and progression are believed to take a number of years.

smallthunder
11-01-2006, 10:25 PM
Why, oh why, do I feel COMPELLED to find an answer to this?

Oh, well ...

"NASAL DISCHARGE is any mucus-like material that comes out of the nose."

Hmm ... that doesn't help with the snot vs. booger question.

OK ... then ... further research shows that "Rhinorrhea" is medical terminology for a runny nose and/or what is produced by same ...

so the best medical description I have found so far for what I assume is a "booger" is ...

(drum roll, or honking nose-blowing, please) ...

"pale, boggy turbinate ... rhinorrhea."

That's it. I'm FINISHED with this. I've got to go get a real life now ...

kikazaru
11-01-2006, 10:34 PM
Nope -- that ain't no booger.

A simple Google search shows that:

Rhinoliths are rare. They are calcareous concretions that are formed by the deposition of salts on an intranasal foreign body. The foreign body, which acts as the nucleus for encrustation, can be either endogenous or exogenous. Dessicated blood clots, ectopic teeth, and bone fragments are examples of endogenous matter. Exogenous materials include fruit seeds, plant material, beads, cotton wool, and dental impression material.



Although the pathogenesis remains unclear; a number of factors are thought to be involved in the formation of rhinoliths. These include entry and impaction of a foreign body in the nasal cavity, acute and chronic inflammation, obstruction and stagnation of nasal secretions, and precipitation of mineral salts. Development and progression are believed to take a number of years.




Gak! So those would be called "Nasal Pearls??"

wordmonkey
11-01-2006, 10:59 PM
And while we're here, if snot is the runny stuff and a booger is the dry stuff, what do you call those ones that are crusty when you start mining, but then as you extract, they seem connected to some curious slimey alien tentacle? Y'know, the snot/booger combo ones.

C.bronco
11-01-2006, 11:07 PM
Those are brain boogers, because, so I hear, when one pulls them out it feels as though they are attached to the subject's brain.
And thank you for not letting this thread die, even after the poster concluded his research. I've had one heck of a week and needed the levity.

JD65
11-01-2006, 11:28 PM
so the best medical description I have found so far for what I assume is a "booger" is ...



"pale, boggy turbinate ... rhinorrhea."


Okay - so I'm not completely convinced that a rhinolith doesn't include an already-picked nasal mucus hunk. (see wiktionary's definition: "A piece of dried nasal mucus.")

But - I do know that "rhinorrhea" is the term for a runny nose (and not the substance emitting therefrom.)

aadams73
11-01-2006, 11:31 PM
Nose-pickin's

San Antonio drivers seem to be oblivious to the fact that other drivers can *see* them picking their noses.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
11-02-2006, 12:09 AM
In Oklahoma City, we all know that sitting at a red light makes you invisible. You can get by with all kinds of things while waiting for the light to change.

DeborahM
11-02-2006, 01:01 AM
Or according to my kids "snot rockets" - when you sneeze and they shoot out your nose like a couple of scud missles.


:ROFL: :roll:

wordmonkey
11-02-2006, 01:02 AM
But - I do know that "rhinorrhea" is the term for a runny nose (and not the substance emitting therefrom.)

I always thought that was like the butt of a large, thick-skinned, behorned African animal?

As in:

"Mommy! Mommy! Look over there! There's a load of mud coming our of that rhinorrhea!"

smallthunder
11-02-2006, 02:18 AM
I always thought that was like the butt of a large, thick-skinned, behorned African animal?

As in:


"Mommy! Mommy! Look over there! There's a load of mud coming our of that rhinorrhea!"

Close, but not quite accurate. "Rhinorrhea" specifically refers to the butt of a large, thick-skinned, behorned African animal with loose bowels ...

BottomlessCup
11-02-2006, 06:13 AM
So many choices!

I think the winner is going to be: "Congealed Nasal Detritus."

I think we can all agree it has that "mother-of-pearl shimmer", as Oliver Wendell Holmes put it.

Thanks for the help everybody!

Rolling Thunder
11-02-2006, 07:28 AM
Just keep in mind;

You can pick your friends and you can pick your nose. But, you can't pick your friend's nose.

Oh, and I'll pitch in my definition: Toddler Treats.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
11-03-2006, 01:23 AM
Just keep in mind;

You can pick your friends and you can pick your nose. But, you can't pick your friend's nose.

Oh, and I'll pitch in my definition: Toddler Treats.

Okay, dammit! Where's the hurling smilie when you need him?!?

Rolling Thunder
11-03-2006, 02:25 AM
http://smileys.smileycentral.com/cat/10/10_2_10.gif

Raiyah
11-03-2006, 02:50 AM
My sister in law often refers to boogers as Mice ("uh-oh, the baby has mice stuck in her nose!")

Does that help?

BottomlessCup
11-03-2006, 04:43 AM
My sister in law often refers to boogers as Mice ("uh-oh, the baby has mice stuck in her nose!")

Does that help?

While cute/icky, it's not entirely scientific. :)

rtilryarms
11-03-2006, 06:13 AM
I am disappointed. There is no medical or scientific term for booger. There is only a method to describe the state in which the fluid rests in a solid state as "Dried Mucus".

The closest word I could find in medical or scientific references was: "Booger".

wordmonkey
11-03-2006, 06:04 PM
And interestingly I find that this thread is like that super sticky booger you sometimes get. No matter hard hard you try, you just can't flick it away. Even when you think it's gone, there it is on the back of your thumb.

Man, I am sooooooooooooooooooo immature.

Threads like this really bring out the worst in me.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
11-03-2006, 06:13 PM
Or you could be like my grand-nephew and ask, "When I roll 'em around on my fingers, they disappear! Where do they go, Auntie Jen?"

rtilryarms
11-03-2006, 09:38 PM
Why did I not think to ask my Assistant Manager? He is a walking Medical Dictionary.

He knew right away that it is "Nasal Exudate".

There is an exudate for every orifice so you have to specify nasal.

wordmonkey
11-04-2006, 12:23 AM
There is an exudate for every orifice so you have to specify nasal.

Isn't that just another term for a two a.m. booty call? As in:

"You look pleased with yourself this morning, Dave."
"Yeah, I was feeling pretty down last night, so I called Wanda at two in the morning."
"Ah, Wanda, she's that exudate, right?"

mommyjo2
11-04-2006, 01:06 AM
We call them Mocos.