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kikonie
11-01-2006, 12:12 AM
I need the help of our English cousins again.

What does the well educated class in the south of England call the evening meal ?

Many thanks,
Kiko, north of the 42nd parallel, N.A.

While I'm at it, is it a 'mug' or a 'beaker' or something else when tea is served in a mug instead of a tea cup?

Sassenach
11-01-2006, 01:47 AM
Hyacinth in "Keeping Up Appearances" serves tea in a "beaker" to Elizabeth, her clumsy neighbor. It's a mug.

waylander
11-01-2006, 02:48 AM
That's dinner generally, or just maybe supper if it is later in the evening and informal. Definitely dinner if there are guests.

The tea would be in a mug, a beaker generally does not have a handle

pdr
11-01-2006, 02:50 AM
It's dinner to the southern upper and upper middle classes.

Usually a beaker doen't have a handle, a mug does.

Breakfast, dinner and tea tend to be working class names for the meals.
You do also get a north of England upper middle class family who will eat breakfast, lunch and a farmhous tea/supper.

Oops, cross posted with Wayland there!

Steve W
11-02-2006, 07:10 PM
Hi,

Yeah, it's dinner - contrasts with the North of England where dinner is your mid-day meal (more location dependent as opposed to class.)

Cheers,
Steve

Elektra
11-02-2006, 09:38 PM
Weird--it's completely the opposite here in the US--dinner is a northern term, whereas supper is usually inthe South.

mistri
11-02-2006, 09:43 PM
I'm from the North and live in the South. I always call lunch, lunch. I call the evening meal dinner or tea.

Stressed
11-04-2006, 01:08 AM
Breakfast, lunch, dinner… never tea! Calling dinner tea would be like calling the sofa the settee as far as the toffs are concerned! I speak as one, I guess, tho now I am ensconced stateside there is of course no such thing as class… ;)

Selcaby
11-05-2006, 09:22 PM
Sometimes people eat breakfast, lunch, tea (or afternoon tea) and dinner, in which case tea is just a snack (e.g. a cup of tea and a piece of cake) in the early evening, and dinner is a main meal, eaten later. My family (middle class southerners) tends to eat like this at Christmas, but rarely at other times.

If you eat the large and small evening meals the other way round, the later one is probably supper (a bedtime snack) and the earlier main one could be either tea or dinner depending on who and where you are.

Women who serve food in school canteens in the middle of the day are always dinner ladies, not lunch ladies, even in the south. (I've never heard of a man who did that job, so I don't know what they would be called.)

And the turkey and trimmings are "Christmas dinner" in my family, even though we eat them at lunchtime.

Selcaby
11-05-2006, 09:26 PM
The only time I'd serve tea or coffee in a beaker is when camping and using plastic crockery.

But plastic cups that come out of vending machines aren't beakers, they are cups.

All in all I'd avoid the word "beaker" unless you have a scene that takes place in a science lab.

kikonie
11-06-2006, 05:06 AM
Sorry all, I've been away for a while. Thanks so much for your help! BTW, I love when you use the vernacular.

Kikonie

littlewriter
11-12-2006, 04:37 AM
by the way, most people drink tea in a mug. but they still call it a cup! for example, one would not ask if you wanted a mug of tea, they would ask if you wanted a cup of tea.

electric.avenue
11-12-2006, 04:50 AM
Yes, I live in England and my meals are breakfast, lunch and dinner.

The term "tea" for the evening meal might be used by older, or more old-fashioned, people in the north of England, and this refers to a meal eaten at around five or six. Dinner is more like from seven onwards.

However, as someone has already pointed out, school lunches are frequently called "school dinners", and Christmas dinner is eaten more as a late lunch.

"Beaker" is a word I have not heard used for something to drink out of except by old aunties, and that was some time ago. Yes, a beaker is that glass thing in the chemistry lab that you put sulphuric acid into.

Snitchcat
11-12-2006, 07:15 PM
I agree with the answers.

My own meals are breakfast, lunch and dinner.

'Tea' is 'afternoon tea' for me, around 4pm or so. And dinner is around 6/7pm. 'Supper'... hmm...I'd always thought it was interchangeable with 'dinner'?

'Beaker' I've not heard used for drinking, more usually chemistry class equipment. Heh.

wordmonkey
11-12-2006, 08:18 PM
When i was growing up in the North of England, we would have tea (US dinner). We would have it at Tea-time, when my dad got home from work.

Breakfast, dinner (lunch) and tea (dinner).

Yes, at school we had the Dinner Ladies but we also took a Packed Lunch.

You can go out to a pub and by a Ploughman's Lunch as well. And you would well wash that down with a quick pint at dinner before heading back to work for the rest of the afternoon.

And if you go out to a restuarant for an evening meal, you'd go out to dinner, even if it was tea-time.

Mug is a very working class term, hence the extreme reaction Mrs. Bucket has to the word. However, if you look at the show (assuming it's running somewhere) while the shape is obviously that of a mug, what she has is made of thin china. A mug that is of a more delicate construction can be a beaker. Which is obviously different from the kinda beaker you find in a Chemistry Class and also different from the kinda Beaker that was regularly blown-up, electrocuted, set on fire, etc. by Dr. Bunsen Honeydew.

All of that is in and around Yorkshire, and a more working class context. Ain't the English language great!?

kikonie
11-13-2006, 10:34 PM
Very cool - thanks to everyone! Nice to know the telly can be counted on for something. Hey Monkey, Brit pubs in Canada often offer a Ploughman's lunch, but if I tried to clean my plate, let alone wash it down with a pint, I'd be snoozing before I paid the bill - lol!

I'm afraid to ask, but does anyone in England use 'cuppa', as in "Do you want a cuppa"?

Cheers,
Kikonie

wordmonkey
11-13-2006, 11:45 PM
I'm afraid to ask, but does anyone in England use 'cuppa', as in "Do you want a cuppa"?

Yeah. Where I'm from people would sit down for a cuppa.

waylander
11-14-2006, 01:10 AM
Seconded. The term 'cuppa' is used by many people

electric.avenue
11-14-2006, 03:19 AM
Yes, the word "cuppa" can be used, although a little tongue in cheek, shall we say.

I would say that the word "mug" is now used here, there and everywhere in England. And mugs are used everywhere too. In fact mugs have become rather fashionable. Everyone has their tea of coffee out of a mug, and there are all sorts of lovely designs.

The only time I use a cup and saucer is

a) in a restaurant

b) when visiting elderly ladies

c) outside the UK

Snitchcat
11-15-2006, 09:41 AM
Hehehe... "cuppa". A term I've not heard in a while. :)

Yes, it's used, but it reminds me of a question: "wan' a cuppa, luv?" =^P

(BTW: Anyone for the Tetley Tea ads with the chimps? They were cool. (^_^))

Bufty
11-15-2006, 03:27 PM
I'd use 'Wanna cuppa?" only with family and friends - a stranger or guest would be asked if they'd like a cup of tea, or simply 'some tea'? In many cases they're not even asked! Just given a smile, accompanied by "I'll put the kettle on!"

A 'brew' is the same thing - often used by ex-Forces folk.

Heaven knows how many ways there are of getting involved in a cuppa on this side of the pond.

And it was only in the mid-late fifties that folk started to switch from tea/high tea to dinner as the term for the evening meal. Maybe something to do with the spread of TV and the US influence. And that's when pre-packed 'TV dinners' began to appear so one could stare at the goggle-box and eat at the same time.

Prior to then, it was the mid-day meal that was the main one and referred to as dinner, with the later eating being a sort of hybrid light meal ending with French cakes or buns and stuff. Unless one had guests, in which case the 'high-tea' then became dinner.

Baffling? Oh yeah.

SJAB
11-15-2006, 03:34 PM
Heaven knows how many ways there are of getting involved in a cuppa on this side of the pond.

I wouldn't like to guess. It's the first thing mentioned in a time of trouble or upset.

I remember when our youngest was admitted into casuality when she was 18 months old. We were sitting there with a sick child (how sick we didn't know at the time) when a nurse asked us if we wanted a cup of tea?Huh??? A busy saturday morning in casuality and a sister no less asking you if you want a cuppa?? Talk about setting the alarm bells ringing

Bufty
11-15-2006, 03:41 PM
And so far, no one has mentioned the what used to be almost compulsory morning 'Elevenses' plus the afternoon tea-break and the late cuppa and biscuits around 9.30-10.00pm before thinking about bed!!

Finally, the 'Tea's-Made Alarm Clock' invention allowed one to even wake up to the sound of the kettle whistling.

A Tea addict was called a Tea-Jenny. Sheesh!

wordmonkey
11-15-2006, 06:46 PM
I also recall, since the terminology speculation has widened, that my folks (family and friends to) would refer to the act of making tea, and "mashing" or "mashing up."

"I'm gonna mash, wanna a cuppa?"

No idea why. My guess would be that the act of adding and mixing tea leave to water was like a mashing motion.

I also remember that after the hot water was added to the leaves/bag in the teapot, that the pot would be left for a while to let the tea stew (strengthen). However, if it was left too long, the tea would generally be thrown out because it had stewed (gotten too strong and bitter).

Go figure.

All this is probably why I switched to drinking coffee.

kikonie
11-15-2006, 11:36 PM
Amazing - I'm so glad I asked. I imagine it would be quite the party if there was a gathering of everyone who answered this thread. <Drifts off into a daydream...>

Thank you..feel free to carry on.

scarletpeaches
11-16-2006, 12:04 AM
Breakfast, lunch, dinner… never tea! Calling dinner tea would be like calling the sofa the settee as far as the toffs are concerned! I speak as one, I guess, tho now I am ensconced stateside there is of course no such thing as class… ;)

If it's a two-seater, it's a sofa.
If it's a three-seater, it's a settee.

But then, I'm Scottish.

Oh, and breakfast, lunch, dinner, supper for me.

I'm a hungry gal. :D

wordmonkey
11-16-2006, 12:10 AM
If it's a two-seater, it's a sofa.
If it's a three-seater, it's a settee.

We always had a settee.

Rich people had sofas.

And only Americans had couches.


But then, I'm Scottish.
Oh, and breakfast, lunch, dinner, supper for me.
I'm a hungry gal. :D

Scottish or Hobbit?

arrowqueen
11-16-2006, 01:39 AM
I'm a Scot too, but from a rural area. It's still breakfast, dinner and tea down here. (Unless you're being posh.)

Then, as a treat if you're out with your Auntie/Granny you get 'High Tea' around half three/four, with cakes, scones and fruit loaf.

As for brewing tea, we 'infuse' it, but my MIL used to 'mask' it.

kikonie
11-16-2006, 01:52 AM
Does the evening meal differ namewise from Highlander to Lowlander?

wordmonkey
11-16-2006, 01:53 AM
Then, as a treat if you're out with your Auntie/Granny you get 'High Tea' around half three/four, with cakes, scones and fruit loaf.

OK, I have to ask.

Do you have scones, or do you have sconns?

pdr
11-16-2006, 04:00 AM
High Tea?

My mother's family were Yorkshire Dales people originally. Her mother always made a High Tea or Farmhouse tea which was (home cured) bacon and egg (Freshly collected) pie, new sausage with bubble and squeak, or home cured ham and a salad, new made bread and good Wensleydale cheese, mint pasties, and griddle cakes like singin' hinnies. Of course there was the large pot of tea and her speciality of marmalade sconn cake. So after a school day with a school dinner one would eat this High/farmhouse tea. And yes, this was Yorkshire so it was sconn and not scone.

Tea was brewed though, not mashed. In the correct parlance my grandmother's high tea could be said to be: 'reet grand!'

arrowqueen
11-17-2006, 02:16 AM
'Do you have scones, or do you have sconns?'

We have scones - we just pronounce it 'sconn.'

As opposed to the Stone of Scone (aka The Stone of Destiny.) - upon which the kings of Scotland were crowned and is now incorporated (allegedly) into the Coronation Throne - and which, just to confuse non-Scots, is pronounced 'Scoon.'

kikonie
11-17-2006, 02:55 AM
I saw the episode of Hamish Macbeth about the stone; now I get shivers just thinking about it. Where is the Coronation Throne? Should I be embarrassed that I don't know? I'm thinking Edinburgh.

kikonie
11-17-2006, 02:58 AM
Where do the Highlands begin? (Probably not a straight line - lol)

arrowqueen
11-18-2006, 03:45 AM
The Coronation Throne is in Westminster Abbey in London - and the Highlands are the northern parts of Scotland. (Probably starting about two thirds of the way up.)

Evaine
11-18-2006, 04:59 PM
No - it was sent back to Edinburgh for the millennium. It always used to be under the Coronation chair in Westminster Abbey so that the new King or Queen of England could claim to have been crowned King or Queen of Scotland at the same time.

Maybe at the next coronation it'll be sent back?

electric.avenue
11-18-2006, 05:17 PM
I eat scones, pronounced as such, definitely not sconn.

And while we're at it, what about the difference between a turnip and a swede? To me a turnip is what you have with mashed potatoes when you eat neeps and tatties, say, with haggis. But my partner, from Birmingham, (and that's Birmingham, England, known as Brum), thinks that's a swede. I've followed what my Mum called it, and her parents were from Scotland.

aruna
11-18-2006, 05:43 PM
I went to a posh boarding school (Ladies' College!) in Yorkshire in the 60's. We had breakfast, lunch, tea, and supper. Tea was at 4 pm and was tea with bread and butter and jam. Supper was a cooked meal.
Breakfast was also a cooked meal. "Continenteal Breakfast" was just bread and butter with jam - regarded with some scorn by the Ladies!

kikonie
11-19-2006, 01:41 AM
Rutabaga, swede, turnip - all the same creature.

Love all the feedback.

Most of my ancestors were highlanders and my fuzzy brain tells me that the highlands start at about Aberdeen. What say you?

pdr
11-19-2006, 05:17 AM
Rutabaga, swede, turnip - all the same creature.

they're not!


I believe that Rutabaga is the American for Swede but Swedes and Manglwurzles are winter root crop feed for animals. However young swedes are tasty for people too.

Turnips can be a feed crop but are usually for people to eat when they are small and young.

Manglewurzles may be close cousin to the Swede but as I remember them they grew large and rounder in shape. The Swede grew large but was more elongated.

In a cold climate Turnips (neeps) and Swedes are good winter vegetables mashed with butter and black pepper. You Scots like to mash white turnip and potatoes for taties and neeps.

arrowqueen
11-20-2006, 01:34 AM
I now have an overwhelming urge to sing 'I've got a brand new combine harvester.'

maya
11-22-2006, 06:13 AM
Hehehe... "cuppa". A term I've not heard in a while. :)

Yes, it's used, but it reminds me of a question: "wan' a cuppa, luv?" =^P

(BTW: Anyone for the Tetley Tea ads with the chimps? They were cool. (^_^))

it's rather late in the chain I know, and completely irrelevant, but did you know those ads were filmed outside of the uk, despite only being shown here? apparently it is illegal to film animals performing here, so they recorded it in greece.

on another tangent (which i am compelled to note) - and you did say you were referring to an englishman so I know it's pointless but my better half would kill me if i didn't point this out - if your protag is scottish and not upper class it would be "what did you have for YOUR tea?". definitely tea. and most definitely a "your" before it. In the same way that it is always "I am going to MY bed." (unless one is going to someone else's bed, in which case one drops the pronoun out of consideration / tact).

oddly enough, the old man and I had a very long "discussion" about this just tonight before I logged on to lurk....it's all rather timely. it's unusual for our arguments to be so very poignant....

and as another useless fyi - everyone around me offers me a "cuppa". but then I live in shoreditch and work in the city, so am surrounded by 'stenders.

xxx
maya

Shara
11-23-2006, 01:33 AM
I grew up in Lancashire in the 70s, and then we had breakfast, dinner, and tea. 'Tea' was about 5pm, though.

The Northern expression for 'would you like a cup of tea' was: "fancy a brew?" A 'cuppa' I think is not so much regional as more old fashioned.

Now I live in the South of England and work in London, and it's breakfast, lunch and dinner. The main difference being the evening meal is much later - most Londoners don't eat much before 8pm but that mostly has to do with everyone being rather late home from work.

This has been a fascinating thread! But now I'm feeling hungry....

Shara

Snitchcat
01-05-2007, 10:15 PM
it's rather late in the chain I know, and completely irrelevant, but did you know those ads were filmed outside of the uk, despite only being shown here? apparently it is illegal to film animals performing here, so they recorded it in greece.

Nope. Didn't know that. Now that is interesting. I saw the entire series of those chimp ads and didn't realise they were filmed outside the country. I only remember that it was mainly sunny outside... LOL. I believe this dates me! (Unless, of course, the ads are still being shown???)

Oh, heading out of the UK for a moment: 'high tea' is popular in Hong Kong -- something left over from the colony days. It's... fun. (^_^)

jvc
01-06-2007, 02:19 AM
if you wanted a cup of tea.

or kippa tie, if you were in Birmingham.

(I love that accent)

I have breakfast (actually I usually skip breakfast), Brunch if it's breakfast/lunch, Lunch if it's just lunch, Dinner at night. If at night I have just a sandwich (more often than not at the moment as I can't be bothered to cook when I get home) then it's tea.

Sandi LeFaucheur
01-06-2007, 05:46 AM
I say tea for the evening meal. And does anyone remember the Ovaltine mugs with the sleepy faces on them in the late 50s/early 60s? (They were resurrected in the late 80s.) We had a couple of them when I was little (in the 60s, not the 80s!) and we always called them beakers.

Thinking about the school dinner/packed lunch thing: maybe it's because school dinners are hot (or they used to be; I know that's not always the case now), and packed lunches were just sarnies?