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karo.ambrose
10-20-2006, 11:06 PM
Hi, I am writing a cover letter for a partial submission and I had a quick question about the use of a semicolon. I'd appreciate it if you'd let me know if it works in this sentence:

--I do not need the enclosed material returned; however, I have included a SASE for your reply.--

Ol' Fashioned Girl
10-20-2006, 11:21 PM
That's the ticket. ;)

karo.ambrose
10-20-2006, 11:49 PM
okay, cool. Thanks!:)

Sandi LeFaucheur
10-22-2006, 06:45 PM
No, you wouldn't use it there; in that sentence, I would just use a comma.

Semi-colons are used to join two seperate sentences with the same thought as one. Also, if you used it there, you are then starting the second sentence with "however," which is another no-no.

A semi-colon precedes "however". A comma follows it. The sentence was correct.

http://www.grammarerrors.com/punctuation.html

alleycat
10-22-2006, 06:52 PM
The use of the semicolon is fine.

I might change "enclosed material" to "manuscript" or "submission" however. Just a thought.

K1P1
10-23-2006, 01:38 AM
A semi-colon precedes "however". A comma follows it. The sentence was correct.

Yep. That is correct formal usage. A comma before "however" would be a mistake.

Jamesaritchie
10-23-2006, 04:45 PM
Hi, I am writing a cover letter for a partial submission and I had a quick question about the use of a semicolon. I'd appreciate it if you'd let me know if it works in this sentence:

--I do not need the enclosed material returned; however, I have included a SASE for your reply.--


My rule is to never use a colon or a semicolon is there's an easier, plainer way of saying something.

I do not need the enclosed material returned. I have, however, included a SASE for your reply.

I do not need the enclosed material returned, but I have included a SASE for your reply.

Colons and semicolons tend to jump off a short page of writing, and also tend to extend sentences beyond where they are comfortable to read. Each has its time and place for good usage, but when you can easily avoid them, it's usually best to do so.

scottVee
10-27-2006, 07:02 AM
I agree with the others that the punctuation is correct as is.

While I can agree with James on trying to avoid semicolons, I think each of his solutions is more awkward. This is one of the dangers of trying to obey a rule "just because". You can agonize over it, follow the rule, and end up with something that's broken or sounds artificial. A pair of connected thoughts is precisely what a semicolon is for. A comma would be iffy and a period would partially break the connection.

jpserra
11-07-2006, 05:21 PM
I agree with the others that the punctuation is correct as is.

While I can agree with James on trying to avoid semicolons, I think each of his solutions is more awkward. This is one of the dangers of trying to obey a rule "just because". You can agonize over it, follow the rule, and end up with something that's broken or sounds artificial. A pair of connected thoughts is precisely what a semicolon is for. A comma would be iffy and a period would partially break the connection.

I'm a transitional on this one. Rules help guide us, but the practice outweighs the rule. How we speak, the rhythm and cadence, is imporatant to how the message will be received. When we compose a document, we are giving our voice to the words on the paper. The person reading it will judge on the experession. I think articulating in our own style is important to communicating self to the reader. The use of semicolons in a short work might not be ideal, but it is personal. And this is the essence of communication.

So, being aware of what we communicate when we deviate from those rules is just as important as what we are communicating through the basic composition.

John Serra