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Anthony Ravenscroft
10-20-2006, 03:42 AM
As we occasionally get questions on this site about "how much should I pay a publicist?" -- & though I think hiring a publicist for a self-pub book is a great way 99.999% of the time to throw money away -- here's a company that not only gets results, but only charges you for what publicity your project actually gets. They're called PayPerClip & are getting good reviews in the business press:
http://www.payperclippr.com/

Lauri B
10-20-2006, 05:59 PM
Hi Anthony,
I went to the site because I'm intrigued by the business model. I don't think this is a good method for publicity for self-pubbed authors: if you get a "brief mention" in a local paper or magazine (this means something like, "Jim Doe recently published his book, My Book" in the local business notes) it will cost you $750. You can do this yourself for free. For each mention you receive in any paper or publication, it costs you several hundred dollars. If you're absolutely intent on hiring a publicist, then you should just hire one. I think this service could be excellent for a small (or large) company with a marketing budget, but could be a real money sink without much return for individual authors.

acousticgroupie
10-22-2006, 05:04 AM
agreed. i'm amazed how much national press i've secured myself:)

Anthony Ravenscroft
10-23-2006, 01:08 AM
I don't think this is a good method for publicity for self-pubbed authors.... You can do this yourself for free. For each mention you receive in any paper or publication, it costs you several hundred dollars.
I don't significantly disagree. However, there are those writers, particularly self-pub types, who feel it's necessary, & aren't very interested in listening. Couple months ago, someone was dead-set ready to "spend $15,000 for the first year" on a publicist, which can easily go to building a blimp: really huge, but full of warm air, kept aloft only while the client has money to burn. If it's gotta happen, then the best I can do (short of wrestling 'em to the ground & sedating them until the episode passes) is suggest they spend their cash on demonstrable results.

If you're absolutely intent on hiring a publicist, then you should just hire one.
But that just brings us back to the root problem: If a writer is having a hard time spotting a legit agent, how much better will they be at finding a publicist that isn't merely a money-pit? The "performance based" model ain't perfect, but it's certainly an improvement.

It's likely of less aid to novelists. However, if your book has a "how to" angle, wouldn't it be nice to spend $1,200 for a balanced-but-positive review in a national trade-audience magazine? I'm trying to finish a "home-based business" book that I naturally feel deserves more than a ten-word review, however glowing.

weezwrites
11-20-2006, 11:57 PM
Interesting! Thanks for bringing it to our attention.

My thoughts: This method might be fine for someone who takes a narrow view of public relations. However, it doesn't take into account the myriad of other ways that a solid public relations plan improves your visibility and your book sales. A good publicist doesn't ONLY focus on landing press coverage. They take a comprehensive approach to planting you in front of the audiences that will buy your books, spread the word about your books, and sell your books -- and the media is only one piece of that.

I'm a PR coach for authors, and people ask me ALL the time whether they should hire a full-time publicist. It all depends on the author's goal and how much time they have to do the work themselves. I know plenty of authors who have made bestseller lists without ever once paying someone to do their public relations for them. But I also know bestsellers who shell out $60K a year for their publicist. There's no right or wrong answer.

Louise
www.louiseknottahern.com

jeffrivera
12-16-2006, 10:49 AM
If you have a natural PR mind then you can do a lot yourself or by hiring an intern (possibly even getting one for free). Or having a consultant (even a book publicist for one of the houses who might coach for a nominal fee). There's so much you can do on your own though once you know how and it cost you nothing but time.