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basenjinana
10-15-2006, 04:59 AM
Just wondering if anyone else here loves Discworld as much as I do. I think I have every one (unless a new one has come out in the last month or so...). I think he is a brilliant writer but what I like most about Terry Pratchett is, whenever I am down, I just pick up one of his books and I am laughing (or at least smiling) within minutes of starting it.

pdr
10-16-2006, 04:03 AM
to make a reader laugh and think.
I've enjoyed Terry Pratchett for a while. He's from that British school of writing that is clever, intelligent and funny but readers do need to be 'with it' as far as the British political scene or they'll miss a lot of the jokes.

basenjinana
10-16-2006, 07:04 AM
I suppose you are right about the British political scene comment. So I guess I have missed a lot of the jokes since I know nothing about it.:Shrug:

But I still enjoy his books for the fast read they give and the laughs (that I do understand). :D

wyzguy
10-16-2006, 08:49 AM
I think my favorite laugh is when the Nac Mac Feegle made a scarecrow so they could ride the coach.

basenjinana
10-16-2006, 08:55 AM
Yes...that was a good one. I think I liked when I was first introduced to the luggage with the legs. I loved his attitude and I'm kind of sorry not to be hearing about him anymore.

army_grunt13
10-17-2006, 08:51 PM
If you'll notice under my profile, Terry Pratchett is listed amongst my all-time favorite authors. I don't have his books, but my Mum and Dad do, so I just borrow them. My sister has the illustrated version of "The Last Hero" about Cohen the Barbarian and the Silver Horde's last hurrah. As for my favorites, it's a toss-up between the watch, the witches, and the wizards (or wizzard as may be the case) of the Unseen University. Of all the characters, I think my favorites are The Archchancellor, Sam Vimes, Death (and the Death of Rats), and Greebo the Cat.

One thing I always do when reading is try and find an applicable person, or at least their voice, for each role. Here are a few that I've come up with, and what previous roles each did to inspire such thought. Of course, since Discworld is very much British, I can only hope that there are other "Yanks" out there besides me who actually get the humor (I was raised on Monty Python and Blackadder). Just curious to know what you guys think:

Rincewind - Eric Idle (he did the voice in the videogames)

Archchancellor - In my mind, Brian Blessed is about the only person with the voice and half-mad demeanor fitting (picture the Condor King from Flash Gordon, or as Richard IV in Blackadder)

Carrot - Hugh Laurie (at least the voice, anyway)

Nobby - Tony Robinson (think the scabbiest version of Baldrick in Blackadder. He also did the voice of Nobby, as well as Dibbler, in the videogame)

Granny Weatherwax - Sian Phillips (in the same demeanor as Livia from I, Claudius)

Nanny Ogg - Patsy Byrne (Nursey from Blackadder)

Death - I always pictured the voice of Sean Connery, but then saw a cartoon version of Wyrd Sisters, in which Christopher Lee does the voice. Both I think are equally fitting.

Lord Vetinarri - Rowan Atkinson (yes, I'm a big Blackadder fan, if you haven't guessed already!)

Pondor Stibbons - Daniel Radcliff in about five years

Fred Colin - Possibly Robbie Coltrane

Evaine
10-17-2006, 09:14 PM
army grunt13 - I think you've got it spot on with those characters, except for Granny Weatherwax.
I'm sorry, but Granny Weatherwax was my grandmother to the life. She and Nanny Ogg are both perfect examples of a certain sort of Lancashire old lady (sadly dying out now - they don't make old ladies like they used to).

Amadeus
10-17-2006, 09:34 PM
I love everything British (American humor shows/books/movies have never really done it for me, at all). Bought the novel 'Mort' reacently and will soon start to read it. Will be my first Terry Pratchett - if you don't count the adventure games made for the PC...

pdr
10-18-2006, 03:28 AM
Hugh Lawrie for Carrot?
Never!

But who could possibly be Sam Vimes?

basenjinana
10-18-2006, 05:45 AM
You know who I thought would be good for Sam Vines - if he was younger, that is - is Sam Elliot. Don't ask me why, but when I read that question, his was the first name that popped into my head.

army_grunt13
10-18-2006, 05:45 AM
Hugh Lawrie for Carrot?
Never!

But who could possibly be Sam Vimes? I think the VOICE of Hugh Laurie is appropriate. I kind of picture Carrot as being like that bald baliff on the '80's TV show, Night Court (with hair, of course).

Sam Vimes is a difficult one, because I always put myself in that role (hey let's face it, we're all guilty of putting ourselves in the 'hero' roles!). Maybe Sean Bean?

pdr
10-18-2006, 06:52 AM
Ah, I was thinking, based on Bernard Cornwall's Sharpe, as seen in the TV series, that Sean Bean could project the right air of angered innocence for Sam Vimes.

Carrot has hidden depths. Hugh Laurie isn't up to them. Pity Laurence Olivier is dead.

Er, sorry, my film and TV viewing is highly selective and, right now, very restricted. Who is Sam Elliot?

basenjinana
10-18-2006, 07:30 AM
LOL...an older, sexy (IMO) movie star. He played in a lot of westerns, played a bouncer with Patrick Swayze in RoadHouse, played General John Buford in Gettysburg, and a bunch of other movies.

He just has an...air...about him that made me think of Sam Vines in the same way. Although that's probably just my imagination - of which I have too much.

army_grunt13
10-18-2006, 05:11 PM
LOL...an older, sexy (IMO) movie star. He played in a lot of westerns, played a bouncer with Patrick Swayze in RoadHouse, played General John Buford in Gettysburg, and a bunch of other movies.

He just has an...air...about him that made me think of Sam Vines in the same way. Although that's probably just my imagination - of which I have too much.

It was odd to see him without his mostache when he portrayed Sgt Major Basil Plumely in the movie "We Were Soldiers." His voice definitely gives him away. Watching an interview with some of the guys who were part of that campaign, they all said he had Sgt Major Plumely down to a tee. Another favorite of mine with him in it is "The Rough Riders," which Tom Berenger plays the perfect Theodore Roosevelt.

Back on topic, I think R. Lee Ermey has the gruff nature of Sam Vimes, but is definitely NOT innocent. My sister suggested maybe Russell Crowe, though I still think Sean Bean would look more the part.

Saint Fool
10-19-2006, 07:00 AM
My dream would be to see Vimes and Granny Weatherwax together in the same book. Who would be left standing?

Dawno
10-19-2006, 08:38 AM
Discworld is one of my favorite series. I got to see Pterry when he did a bookstore visit in my town for Thud!. He's charming and quite funny in person.

A number of us here chose demon names to honor Liam's book release - you may note mine is from Good Omens - which Pterry co-wrote with Neil Gaiman.

There's a very lively Discworld community on Live Journal and another on Yahoo. Someone once started a Discworld forum - I've forgotten the link and it's home on my other computer - when I get back from this business trip I'll try to remember to post it, after I check to see if it's still up and running. I do hope you're all familiar with the L-space web (http://www.lspace.org/)...

One of my favorite things in Discworld is Hex and the wizards in the High Energy Magic department, and the phrase that seems to explain everything: "...because of quantum"

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v304/Ebil_Librarian/DiscworldHEXLJIcon.jpg

Cyjon
10-19-2006, 09:24 AM
When my brother died, I inherited his huge collection of hundreds of SF and fantasy books, including the first four Discworld books. I spent the next several years going through all of my brother's books and as I finally neared the end of the collection I decided it was time to buy a few more. So I headed to the bookstore, and I said, "Hey, I remember liking those book buy that guy, what was his name, Pratchett? I wonder if he's written anything since then."

Um, yes he'd managed to write a couple more.

I've been in love with the series since. For a while, some of the older books were out of print so I missed a few volumes in the series. I was quite happy when they put out new editions.

Novelust
10-19-2006, 09:23 PM
God, I love Pratchett.

He's consistently good. When I pick up one of his books, I know I'll like it. I don't think I've ever read a crappy Pratchett - there are a few I don't especially connect with (sorry, sorry, I'm not a Rincewind gal), but there are none that have been unworthy of the purchase price.

As funny and fantastic as the situations are, he keeps the characters behaving like real people. Someone said it further up the thread - but I knew Granny Weatherwax.

JBI
10-20-2006, 02:37 AM
I put down The Color Of Magic. It was decent, but not my thing.

pdr
10-20-2006, 03:52 AM
Wish I could write like Mr Pratchett.
It's what Pratchett says underneath the story about people, and things like privatising the post office (Going Postal), his comments on computers via the clacks, his take on the world and crazy politics and politicians, that is so good. 'Thud' I have enjoyed as a poke at all bigotry.

And I think his belief that people can redeem themselves, Sam Vimes raising himself from drunken coward to the commander of a serious police force, or Moist van Lipwig in 'Going Postal', make the books more than satire, they give one hope in this crazy world.

army_grunt13
10-20-2006, 04:24 AM
My personal favorite has to be "Lords and Ladies," because it has so many of my favorites in it (except the Watch). I liked how you find out that Granny Weatherwax and Archchancellor Ridcully have a "history," and he even tries to woo her once again. I also like how it pokes fun at certain stereotypes, like finding out that fairies and elves aren't so nice after all. . .and of course the sequences with Greebo the Cat are among my favorites.

JDCrayne
10-20-2006, 05:54 AM
Love Pratchett!! Absolutely love him! I just got his latest juvenile, "Wintersmith" but haven't read it yet. The last one I read was "Thud!" My favorite (so far) is "Reaper Man."

army_grunt13
10-23-2006, 05:42 AM
Love Pratchett!! Absolutely love him! I just got his latest juvenile, "Wintersmith" but haven't read it yet. The last one I read was "Thud!" My favorite (so far) is "Reaper Man." Have you read "Hogfather," where Death takes over for the Discworld version of Santa Claus?

wordmonkey
10-23-2006, 06:34 PM
If you like the master, you might also enjoy this...

http://www.amazon.com/Pub-at-Center-Universe/dp/0977367657/sr=8-1/qid=1161613638/ref=sr_1_1/102-6222715-0692150?ie=UTF8&s=books

It was released yesterday I think.

I know the author and he's a jolly nice chap, rescues orphans, is working on an invention for free energy, and always treats waiters and waitresses with kindness and politeness. He's also sitting in my chair wearing my pants.

Stormhawk
10-24-2006, 12:09 AM
I put down The Color Of Magic. It was decent, but not my thing.

Stop. Go pick up another book in the series, like Mort or later. It took PTerry a few books to get into the groove that makes Discworld great. I have The Colour of Magic on my shelf...I intend on reading it one day..really..

...meanwhile my copies of Reaper Man and Hogfather are so dogeared my dog is jealous.

Evaine
10-25-2006, 10:47 PM
I remember Colour of Magic coming out, and being compared to Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, but for fantasy. I remember really enjoying it - and then, as Stormhawk says, TP got much, much better.
Mort is a good one to start with, or maybe Guards, Guards!

Btw, Paul Darrow played Sam Vimes on stage. He's best known for playing Avon in Blake's Seven in the 80s.

pdr
10-26-2006, 05:06 AM
about Terry Pratchett's books is that you can read and see the development of a writer. His confidence and ability rise as his work is bought, read and loved. Seems that part of feedback to a writer is really needed, in fact vital to the improvement of the writer's skills.

If you don't like the more whimsical witches and wizard magic books do at least read the Ank-Morpork City guard books starting with 'Guards! Guards!'. Then the odd, not-a-series ones like 'Going Postal' and 'Monstrous Regiment'. Even if you don't get the British in-jokes about politics, you can't miss the jokes about folk songs and singers and privatising necessary national services like the Post Office.

And who can forget Death as the Hogfather? (Disc World Father Christmas!)

Shadow_Ferret
02-12-2007, 01:27 AM
I've heard some interesting things about Terry Prachett but I've never read anything by him. Any opinions on him?

Can anyone recommend what book to start with to get a feel for his style?

Every book I've picked up seemed to be part of some series... Ringworld? And I had starting series books in the middle and not understanding what's going on.

Thanks.

scarletpeaches
02-12-2007, 01:46 AM
Discworld.

I'd start with "The Colour of Magic", which was the first in this series. The second is "The Light Fantastic". It's always better to read books in order and I think he's up to the 5,249th Discworld book now. Okay, thirtieth or thereabouts.

Dawno
02-12-2007, 01:58 AM
I am a huge Pratchett fan. There is a bit of sense in reading by publication date, but some folk get bogged down in the early books (he gets better and better) and give up.

You can read something that's fairly "stand alone" to get a sense of him - Soul Music is good - you'll figure out pretty quickly into it who's what even though the characters are well established before that book was written. Small Gods, The Truth, Monstrous Regiment, Going Postal and Carpe Jugulum can be read as stand alones pretty easily, too.

He's got three major character/plot arcs Wizards, Witches and The Watch. There are sets of books you can follow through (skipping others) if you think you might favor one of these groups. This link on the L-Space web will help identify them (http://www.lspace.org/books/reading-order-guides/index.html)(the Adobe pdf version (http://www.lspace.org/books/reading-order-guides/the-discworld-reading-order-guide-1-5.pdf) is the most up to date, it appears)

The Wizards of the Unseen University were introduced in the earliest books, then the Witches and finally the Watch. Death (a character, not the occurance) appears in nearly every book, if not all of them (I haven't done my annual perigrination thru the Prachett Canon yet, so I can't recall clearly). His story arc is also fun and interesting.

It helps to have a passing familiarity with British humour, their word usage and a bit of their history and current events to really *get* Pratchett. He's a satirist, to be sure.

There are some sites that might help - his official publisher's site Terry Pratchett Books (http://www.terrypratchettbooks.com/)
and

The L-space Web (http://www.lspace.org/)

he has a Wikipedia entry and there are a number of Amazon users who've given their Pratchett lists for reference as well.

Also, his book with Neil Gaiman (Good Omens) is wonderful, too.


Oh, and it's Discworld - Ringworld is Larry Niven.

Soccer Mom
02-12-2007, 04:32 AM
I love Terry Pratchett. I'm partial to the Witch books and as you can see by my signature line, I'm a fan of the Wee Free Men (Aka the Nac Mac Feegle). These are shelved with the teen books, but are true YA (and most enjoyable to real adults too).

BottomlessCup
02-12-2007, 04:35 AM
I liked "Good Omens", which he wrote with Neil Gaiman. But I'm not sure what was Neil and what was Terry.

scarletpeaches
02-12-2007, 04:37 AM
How could I forget Good Omens?! The bit about bananas had me crying with laughter. (Don't ask).

Ook!

Mac H.
02-12-2007, 05:03 AM
While they all have ongoing jokes and references, most can be enjoyed without reading the others.

One of the best, most self-contained ones would be 'Men at Arms'.

You don't even need to know that Discworld is a disc to enjoy that one.

(Personally, I think 'Men at Arms' would be the best one to make into a movie.)

Mac

JanDarby
02-12-2007, 05:51 AM
I usually recommend starting with the Watch subseries. The first one is Guards! Guards! I believe. And then read the rest of the Watch series (or the rest of the books generally) in order to get the most out of them, b/c later books contain jokes that only make sense if you've read earlier books. Although, technically, they stand alone, but you'll get more out of them if you read them in order.

Going Postal is also a good stand-alone. And if you get addicted and run out of the adult books, check out his kids' books, starting with The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents, and then the Tiffany Aching books. They're not just for kids.

I, personally, like the early books featuring Rincewind (e.g., Colour of Magic), but they're clearly early books, and they're not as good an indication of what Pratchett is capable of, and some people have a hard time getting into the early books.

As a writer, though, I find it absolutely fascinating to read them in order, starting with those early efforts, and watching Pratchett grow as an author, from his early funny and inspired but distant and shallow stories to his most recent works, which are still funny and inspired, but deeper and more emotional.

Say, isn't a new book due out soon? The sequel of sorts to Going Postal?

JD

Dawno
02-12-2007, 06:42 AM
Wintersmith came out last fall and I figured it could be a while before a new Discworld is out - but I'm not up on all the latest Pratchett news. I'm wishing for a DVD of the Hogsfather production that showed Christmas week in England.

Soccer Mom
02-12-2007, 07:38 AM
Wintersmith is the third book of the Tiffany Aching series. I'm expecting mine any day now. Amazon promises me it's been shipped. :D

JanDarby
02-12-2007, 08:55 PM
I've read Wintersmith. Twice. Yeah, I'm an obsessed fan, but I draw the line at stalking. I actually met him a couple years ago -- he was standing about 6" away from me -- and was struck speechless. Well, "met" is probably an overstatement, b/c I was standing there thinking "oh my gosh, it's him, and I'm going to make a fool of myself" over and over until he left. Sigh.

I thought I recalled that the next book in the adult series was due sometime this year. There were some delays for health reasons in the release of Wintersmith, so I thought he'd be playing catch-up with the next adult book.

JD

Soccer Mom
02-12-2007, 08:58 PM
I haven't seen the adult book listed yet on Amazon, but then again I haven't stalked googled Pratchett in a little while. I'll keep checking.

Not that I'm obsessed or anything.....

Dawno
02-12-2007, 09:13 PM
Terry did a signing at the indie bookstore in my town back in Sept. of '05 and I blogged about it here (http://dawnonowyouseeit.blogspot.com/2005/09/im-here.html) and here (http://dawnonowyouseeit.blogspot.com/2005/09/last-giggly-fangirl-post.html). The last link has a picture of Terry signing my copies of Thud and Where's My Cow?

JanDarby
02-13-2007, 01:57 AM
I found the next book! It's called Making Money. Not due out until October, though.

Here's the link to amazon in the UK:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Making-Money-Terry-Pratchett/dp/0385611013

Amazon.com has it too, but the listing doesn't have the summary of the plot, like the UK version does.

Good news: Moist is back!

JD, who really shoulda' been doing other things this afternoon

Soccer Mom
02-13-2007, 02:26 AM
Yee haw! You are my hero for so many reasons, Jan!

JohnB1988
02-13-2007, 04:43 AM
My brother, who lives in England, said that Terry did a television interview recently, and he (Terry) admitted that re-reading his early books made him cringe. But he also said that if he had to write them today, he couldn’t be as funny. He also said that he kinda regretted making Diskworld a disk. He just tossed it into the first book and then got stuck with it! Boy, were we lucky?

Oh, his publisher released on of his “Early” (from under the bed) works called Strata. You can see hints of Diskworld in it. But overall I think it’s a disappointment. Nothing like the stuff he produced once he found his voice.

JeanneTGC
02-13-2007, 09:45 AM
I am a huge Pratchett fan (he's my favorite living author), and I started with The Colour of Magic and then The Light Fantastic. I loved them then and I still love them now.

If you have read a lot of sci-fi and fantasy, then those two first books are a must, because he's satirizing a lot of sf-f heroes and it's laugh out loud funny to see what he does with them. More than any of the books that follow, those two are almost complete satire of existing sf-f storylines, while still building an entirely new world with new characters. (The man is my god. And not a small one, either.)

Also, the first 4 chapters in The Colour of Magic were, I believe, originally published as stand alone short stories. It helps to read them as such because it makes the way that book works more logical, if you will.

Otherwise, if you insist upon not starting at the beginning (which is a very good place to start), then I usually recommend these based on different viewpoints:

For girls (in particular) or feminists of any kind -- Equal Rites
For the first book where he really hits full-on Discworld stride -- Mort
For the best stand alone -- Small Gods (this is still, to me, probably the best one out of the entire series)

There is a huge Discworld/Pratchett fandom. Before you enter it, you need to read Pyramids, otherwise, you have no idea why we all call him Pterry. (If anyone needs the link to get onto the monthly Discworld newsletter, just send me a PM.)

If you just want to get an idea of whether or not you like his writing style, then do pick up Good Omens. It's excellent, and I can tell where Neil and Terry end/interact, if you will. But it's one of the better done collaborations that I've read. And it's a stand-alone, so you're not making a "world" (and a 30+ book) commitment.

In my world, Good Omens or any Discworld means you can't go wrong. (I'm with John on Strata -- doesn't do it for me in any real way.)

Vincent
02-13-2007, 11:03 AM
I only just got into Pratchett, while reading Truckers. It might be intended for a younder crowd, but it had me laughing like no other book has in a long time.

KellyG
02-13-2007, 11:07 PM
I might try the Colour of Magic as I have the same problem with his books in that I feel like I'm always coming in late to a party when I've taken a toe dip in others!

blueskyscribe
02-17-2007, 12:16 PM
I love Pratchett! :D Good starting points that don't require a lot of background: Going Postal, Guards! Guards! (my personal favorite), Wee Free Men, and Small Gods (another of my all time favorites.) He's got a very distinctive, witty, bantering style of writing. Good Omens, which he cowrote with Neil Gaiman, is definitely written in Pratchett's "voice".

His trilogy of nome books, Truckers, Diggers, and Wingers are pretty funny too. They're set outside Discworld.

Soccer Mom
02-17-2007, 10:50 PM
Yay! Got my copy of Wintersmith. I'll see everyone again in a couple of days. :D

johnzakour
02-17-2007, 11:16 PM
He's a cool guy.

pdr
02-18-2007, 04:16 PM
He's one in a long line of British satirical writers and he takes a swipe at everything. He's one writer I must not read in public as I laugh out loud.

Prefer the Guard books and the later ones.

It's a real education as a writer to read the series and see how he develops his writing skills but his characterisation always was outstanding.

Gabriel
02-18-2007, 05:28 PM
TERRY PRACHETT IS REALLY GOD IN DISGUISE!!!
This guy rules! I love everyone of his books, the first writer I got seriously into , his humour is fantastic.
The best books are the Sam vimes, Death and Rincewind ones.

Novelust
02-19-2007, 11:19 AM
Oh, I have such love for the Watch and the Witches. I'm not a Rincewind fan, but you can't have everything, right?

I aspire to be Granny Weatherwax when I grow up.

PeeDee
02-19-2007, 11:45 AM
I WOULDN'T start at teh beginning of the series, actually. His writing his weaker. They're enjoyable books, but I think it's better to be acclimated before you get to them.

I recommend "The Truth" or "Going Postal" or "Monstrous Regiment" as wonderful starting points. There's no backstory you need for any of them (there's usually only a minimum of backstory you need for the others too).

I'm a Sam Vimes guy myself. I love Sam Vimes novels.

Although I adored Moist Von Lipwig in "Going Postal."

Terry made passing mention of his next book (which I thought he said was going to be called "Money Matters") which would be about Moist Von Lipwig taking over the city treasury. It was only a small and in passing reference that I haven't been able to find again, but I'd love another Moist novel.

spinnerin
02-20-2007, 02:07 AM
Terry made passing mention of his next book (which I thought he said was going to be called "Money Matters") which would be about Moist Von Lipwig taking over the city treasury. It was only a small and in passing reference that I haven't been able to find again, but I'd love another Moist novel.

A friend's mother just came back from a big Discworld convention in Australia, and apparently there was a pajama party where he read from his WIP until the laptop battery went dead, but I forgot to ask which characters were involved. I should check.

PeeDee
02-20-2007, 02:19 AM
A friend's mother just came back from a big Discworld convention in Australia, and apparently there was a pajama party where he read from his WIP until the laptop battery went dead, but I forgot to ask which characters were involved. I should check.

You should, I'd love to hear more about it. I'm a big Pratchett fan (I think he's a very smart writer as well as being a good writer) but I can find woefully little stuff about him on the internet. For once, being American is not to my advantage.

(but I don't mind.)

PeeDee
02-20-2007, 12:02 PM
Here we go! (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Making-Money-Terry-Pratchett/dp/0385611013/sr=1-22/qid=1171958352/ref=sr_1_22/202-6565004-0399049?ie=UTF8&s=books)

Hooray! Another Moist von Lipvig novel!

And another thing...browsing around amazon.co.uk....I've come to realize that the U.S. has gotten completely screwed over on Terry Pratchett (and Harry Potter) book covers. They're gorgeous! Ours are less so.

spinnerin
02-21-2007, 02:40 AM
Here we go! (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Making-Money-Terry-Pratchett/dp/0385611013/sr=1-22/qid=1171958352/ref=sr_1_22/202-6565004-0399049?ie=UTF8&s=books)

Hooray! Another Moist von Lipvig novel!

And another thing...browsing around amazon.co.uk....I've come to realize that the U.S. has gotten completely screwed over on Terry Pratchett (and Harry Potter) book covers. They're gorgeous! Ours are less so.

I know people who go out of their way to order the UK editions. I think you can get them through the University Bookstore in Seattle, if you want a store in the US.

MMcC
02-21-2007, 03:05 AM
Pratchett is my favorite author. The only two books of his I found mediocre were Moving Pictures and Jingo, and even those weren't BAD so much as just "ok."

My expectations are so ridiculous it would be completely unfair to expect him to meet them... though he almost always does.

JeanneTGC
02-21-2007, 03:14 AM
Pratchett is my favorite author. The only two books of his I found mediocre were Moving Pictures and Jingo, and even those weren't BAD so much as just "ok."

My expectations are so ridiculous it would be completely unfair to expect him to meet them... though he almost always does.
I'm with you -- Moving Pictures, no matter how many times I re-read it, just makes my "okay" list. I was more disappointed in Monstrous Regiment than Jingo, though. Again, not like it was "bad" but not up to the standard high pedestal where Pratchett lives in my world. :tongue

Festus
02-21-2007, 03:35 AM
Louis L'Amour and Teryy Pratchett, my two favorite authors, Pratchett can make a rock laugh!

Festus

wordmonkey
02-21-2007, 08:09 AM
I liked "Good Omens", which he wrote with Neil Gaiman. But I'm not sure what was Neil and what was Terry.

If you read Gaiman's "Violent Cases" you'll see exactly where he fits in. I'd also be willing to bet that the angel is his and the demon is TP. However, the THEM is all Gaiman.

PS. I'd read the all, but for me, he really hits his stride at "Mort."

And anyone who doesn't see the genius of "Moving Pictures" needs to go rent a LOT of classic movies then re-read. The Blues Brothers twisted quote; the giant woman carrying an ape up the side of a tower; the Keystone Wizards; and that's just off the top of my head having read it last when it first came out! Come on!!!! Brilliance!

Jingo is one of the later ones where he gets much slicker, thoughtful and smart about theme and telling you "something" as well as a great story.

MMcC
02-21-2007, 11:16 AM
Good Omens is one of the funniest books ever written.

The Biker dudes who join up on the Apocalypse death ride and keep changing their names make me pee.

I am very fond of Gaimon. Chris Moore reminds me of him when he's "ON" but very often I find Moore flat. Loved Practical Demon Keeping, The Stupidest Angel, and Biff. Some of the other stuff tries too hard.

pdr
02-21-2007, 01:28 PM
How can you not like 'Monstrous Regiment' or 'Jingo'? Pratchett's writing goes up a whole notch in both of those.

Mind you I think this is where having a British education and understanding of British things political comes in handy to appreciate both books.

'Jingo' relies on the reader knowing about Laurence of Arabia and the British in Arabia, Colonial attitudes and those WW1 poets and their comments on officers. Of course Pratchett is having a good kick at prejudice and people who wage war over trifles, and at people with power who think that strolling into someone else's country to take what they want is a good idea.

It helps with 'Monstrous Regiment' if you know the title is quote from the Scottish minister, John Knox about Mary Queen of Scotts, but Knox was a misogynist anyway.

I love the way Pratchett takes all those old cliches about women (and men too) and turns them upside down. I still laugh just thinking about the socks and Polly's many comments about the socks taking over.



----spoiler warning----























And I love Jackrum who thinks like I do when she says that she didn't the women, when given a chance, would simply follow what the men had done and be as stupid. I fought hard in the 60s for equal rights for women and I'm ashamed of what women have and haven't done with their opportunities. I find it quite something that Terry Pratchett, (because he's male) can see and say this too.

Dawno
02-21-2007, 07:36 PM
Let's remember our readers may not have read the books we're talking about and put "spoiler" in the post title if we're going to reveal something crucial.

MMcC
02-21-2007, 08:59 PM
For what it's worth I earned my graduate degrees in England and my mother is from Ireland.

I liked MR, but found Jingo to be poorly organized. I thought Moving Pictures was an interesting idea, but it was another book that (for me) meandered and seemed to want to accomplish something unique, but at the cost of its plot.

Just my 2.

Nakhlasmoke
02-21-2007, 09:04 PM
I'm a huge Pterry fan, and I still didn't enjoy Monstrous Regiment, it lacked a certain something, I thought. It almost felt as if Pterry was trying to hard to prove a point.

Then again my favourite book is Night Watch, I love Vimes.

Saanen
02-22-2007, 02:14 AM
I'm another rabid Pratchett fan who didn't really like Monstrous Regiment. Then again, I've only read it once. Maybe it's time for another look. I'm rereading Going Postal right now, as it happens, so I'm delighted to hear Moist will be back. My favorite books are the Vimes ones, but I love Small Gods and Maskerade too. Oh heck, I love them all.

My cousin used to collect the British edition paperbacks while I had the hardbacks. When I moved last spring I traded him, so now I have all those wonderful covers. :)

JanDarby
02-22-2007, 02:20 AM
Monstrous Regiment isn't my favorite either -- the trying too hard thing might be the reason for me too -- but Terry at his worst is still better than many folks at their best. On reread, I did find some stuff in MR that I really liked. The socks didn't work for me so much, but I loved the vampire's coffee obsession and everything related to that part of the story.

JD

pdr
02-22-2007, 03:59 AM
My apologies, Dawno, re the spoilers, but as this thread is the book club where we talk about books we've read, I assumed that we were able to discuss the books without needing spoilers!

PeeDee
02-22-2007, 04:07 AM
I quite liked Monstrous Regiment, particularly the audio book for it. That book gave me my favorite line:

"I joined de army to see foreign places an' meet erotic people." Carborundum rumbled.

There was a pause.

"Um. I expect you mean 'exotic," Igor said at last.

"Somethin' like dat, yeh." said Carborundum.

(liberties taken with the quote to prevent spoilers.)

I liked Jingo too, but I just like Vimes books.

I want to read "Hogsfather" next, because the SkyOne adaptation was really, really well done and I haven't read the book yet.

pdr
02-22-2007, 05:21 AM
Mr Pratchett is at a writing crossroad. I wonder if he's finding himself wanting to write 'more literary' subject matter (for want of a better way to explain), work with a little more 'literary weight' like 'Monstrous Regiment' and take a satirical bash at more things like corrupt industry practices he demolishes in 'Going Postal'. In other words he is wanting to get a little more serious in his writing.

I'm not a fan of the pure magic, 'silly' humour books in the Disc World series because I can't stand 'silly' stuff. This is purely personal, but I wonder if Terry Pratchett is, as he's getting older, looking at the horrible mess the world is in and not finding the silly humour in it any more.

It will be interesting to read his next book.

And how will the fans cope if he does turn 'more serious'? Will there be more like me who came to Pratchett through his later work and will all the fans of his early works disappear in disappointment?

PeeDee
02-22-2007, 05:34 AM
Thus far, they cope just fine. I mean, Night Watch had its moments of fun, but it was a very serious book overall. People died, and there is no humor in that. Bad things happened.

"Thud" was the same way. Again, there were funny moments, but there was a lot more grim material in there. A lot of things that spooked me, not in the sense of horror, but because of the ideas behind them. (Which I would refer to specifically, but am avoiding spoilers.)

Sometimes, I think that's why he started the Moist Von Lipvig books. Because the Vimes books grow more serious, standalone books like Monstrous Regiment are serious at their core....and then he writes Moist Von Lipvig, which is a delightful book that rushes through to the ending. It does deal with serious matters, but not very seriously, if you follow me.

I prefer his later works, when he's grown as a writer. The Vimes books, Going Postal, Monstrous Regiment, and The Truth. I'm very fond of all these books.

Dawno
02-22-2007, 06:11 AM
Look - I DID NOT SAY "no spoilers" I said GIVE A WARNING. With a warning I can skip your post or skip the part that you indicate is a spoiler.

THIS THREAD was started by someone who said, very clearly, they hadn't read Pratchett. Yes, some threads are about a book in detail and if I don't want to have the story spoilt I won't read those threads.

It's just common courtesy, isn't it?

PeeDee
02-22-2007, 06:15 AM
Spoiler warnings are never useful for me. So if it's not a thread where we throw around spoilers willy nilly, then I just avoid them altogether. That's all. :)

JeanneTGC
02-23-2007, 03:30 AM
How can you not like 'Monstrous Regiment' or 'Jingo'? Pratchett's writing goes up a whole notch in both of those.

Mind you I think this is where having a British education and understanding of British things political comes in handy to appreciate both books.

'Jingo' relies on the reader knowing about Laurence of Arabia and the British in Arabia, Colonial attitudes and those WW1 poets and their comments on officers. Of course Pratchett is having a good kick at prejudice and people who wage war over trifles, and at people with power who think that strolling into someone else's country to take what they want is a good idea.

It helps with 'Monstrous Regiment' if you know the title is quote from the Scottish minister, John Knox about Mary Queen of Scotts, but Knox was a misogynist anyway.

I love the way Pratchett takes all those old cliches about women (and men too) and turns them upside down. I still laugh just thinking about the socks and Polly's many comments about the socks taking over.
No, I got all that. I understand everything he's going for in all of his books (I had a classical education ;) ). I just find Monstrous Regiment to, as others have said, be trying too hard. For his best on equal rights well...I point you to Equal Rites.

For those in love with Moving Pictures, again, I know what he's going for. Again, doesn't match up to some of what I consider his finest. (For me, none of them can match Small Gods.)

With as many books in the Discworld series as there are, there is no way every single Pratchett fan will all put the same book as #1 or at the bottom of the list.

I think it's part of what makes him such a fabulous writer -- that he has so much out there that appeals to so many. Yet all of them, even the ones each of us will put at the bottom of the list, are readable, enjoyable and good.

pdr
02-23-2007, 04:53 AM
a long discussion with you, Pee Dee, (and every one else of course) about 'Thud' which I actually found disappointing. I felt it was an attempt to combine more of the Magical and the Watch and didn't quite work.

But I don't know which bits to yell SPOILER about and I really have very little time if I'm to get my teaching and writing done. So please PM me with those bits you wanted to talk about and see if I can 'get it' better. I find it helps a lot to discuss a 'difficult' book with someone who loves it.

Dawno
02-23-2007, 05:39 AM
My apologies, Dawno, re the spoilers, but as this thread is the book club where we talk about books we've read, I assumed that we were able to discuss the books without needing spoilers!

This thread isn't about a particular book. It was a request from a reader to get feedback on what Pratchett books to read.

If you want to discuss specific books in detail and post information about those books why not start another thread? Seems to me you avoid all the terrible burden of spoiler warnings and leave this thread intact so people who haven't read Pratchett don't find out things about specific books that would, frankly, ruin them if they knew them in advance.

This is my last post on the topic of spoilers in THIS THREAD. Again, I'm not talking about the book club forum as a whole - only this thread. Spoil away everwhere else you'd like.

PeeDee
02-23-2007, 05:41 AM
I was going to start a new thread for spoilering away with Terry Pratchett...except it still doesn't work, because some people haven't read ALL the books. With 31 books int he series, plus all the others, that's too many books to read and not spoil.

So I didn't.

The end.

:)

Will Lavender
02-23-2007, 05:44 AM
Wow, this thread has made me want to go out and find some Terry Pratchett.
I've never read him. I will soon.

PeeDee
02-23-2007, 05:47 AM
Wow, this thread has made me want to go out and find some Terry Pratchett.
I've never read him. I will soon.

Don't start at the beginning of the series. Please please please don't. Start with more recent books. Honest, you'll be a happier person.

I recommend "Going Postal" :D

Soccer Mom
02-23-2007, 06:27 AM
I'm a Wee Free Men addict myself. Just in case you couldn't tell.

Medievalist
02-23-2007, 08:04 AM
THIS THREAD was started by someone who said, very clearly, they hadn't read Pratchett. Yes, some threads are about a book in detail and if I don't want to have the story spoilt I won't read those threads.

It's just common courtesy, isn't it?

Yes it is; because such issues are very very important to some readers, and it's quite easy to ignore a warning a few lines of text if you're one who doesn't care.

Part of participating in a community is being thoughtful, and courteous, particularly when it's just a basic and very common request.

MMcC
02-23-2007, 09:18 AM
I wouldn't start with later books. Just my opinion, but he DOES reference earlier stuff now and again, and reading them in order often helps build a sense of his direction and change as an author.

As for me, I shall take my dried frog pills and carry on. *blErT!*

PeeDee
02-23-2007, 09:57 AM
I wouldn't start with later books. Just my opinion, but he DOES reference earlier stuff now and again, and reading them in order often helps build a sense of his direction and change as an author.


Yeah, I suppose, but even Terry has said a few times that his first few books just weren't that good. He hadn't found his footing yet.

Dawno
02-23-2007, 10:35 AM
I started reading Pratchett in the middle - forget which one, although I think it was Small Gods. Read a few more that were newer and decided I had to go back and read all the earlier ones in order. I'm glad I did it that way, it was easier to get through some of the earlier books that weren't as well written because I had a goal in mind - to learn the back story and catch back up to the newer works. About once a year I pull out all my Pratchetts and read them in order.

Has anyone mentioned The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents - that's a good one, too.

JanDarby
02-24-2007, 04:17 AM
I agree with PeeDee -- Going Postal is a great place to start. Sure, there's some stuff a reader might miss that relate back to earlier books, but it's more indicative of what Pratchett's capable of, and it's more addictive. And his books are eminently re-readable, so it's not like it couldn't be read again, after the earlier books were read.

JD

JeanneTGC
02-24-2007, 10:17 AM
I still maintain that you can love Pratchett by starting at the start. I was hooked on the entire series after the first page of The Colour of Magic. I loved The Light Fantastic, thought it was a great companion to TCOM. Just because it was early doesn't mean it was bad. Plus, both of those books are short enough that you can zip through them. And I like seeing his writing and the Discworld itself expand and grow as each book progresses.

Start at the start!

(I'm gonna have to start an "Up with TCOM and TLF" society where people read the first books first and stop dissing them. There, there, first books...I still love and adore you.)

JanDarby
02-25-2007, 01:12 AM
I like the early ones myself, but I've heard too many people who decided they didn't like Pratchett based on those early books, and they never got to the later ones, and I just think that's sad.

JD

startwearingpurple
02-25-2007, 03:10 AM
i started reading him when i was 12 im now 16 and have every one of his books i love him... i started with mort and its now my favorite of all of his books although someothers come real close.

ShapeSphere
02-25-2007, 04:06 AM
I'm a fan of Terry Pratchett but started a little late on the books, Playing catch up at the moment with a few to go. Small Gods is one of my favourites and I like the Oriental theme of Interesting Times.

Has anybody ever met him? I remember years ago on British TV seeing a program on him and he came across as a real curmudgeon. It was not good! (Perhaps that's TV editing for you).

He was doing a book signing and didn't take kindly to a fortysomething woman offering a story idea. Understandable when he probably has lots of his own. Then a young man came in with ALL of his hardbacks in a plastic bag and wanted Pratchett to sign them all. TP was not happy.

One writer also commented on TP's voice saying it was a cross between John Gielgud and Miss Tiggywinkle. Ouch.

TP is brilliant, and his characters and comedy are fantastic. I like Vetinari, but Nobby and Cut Me Own Throat (C.M.O.T) Dibbler are great as well.

I think if a live action film was to be made, Bob Hoskins could play the Librarian and Keanu Reeves could play The Luggage.

PeeDee
02-25-2007, 04:29 AM
I like the early ones myself, but I've heard too many people who decided they didn't like Pratchett based on those early books, and they never got to the later ones, and I just think that's sad.

JD

That's why I don't recommend starting with the early books. I enjoyed them, but if I hadn't read other Discworld books first, I don't think I would have continued based on The Color of Magic.

JanDarby
02-25-2007, 04:30 AM
Oh, no, he's definitely not a curmudgeon.

I've met him, very briefly and all, but I came away with the impression that he is just the sweetest man on the planet.

Since you asked, I'll share two little stories. First, I was at WorldCon, admiring a little replica of Unseen University, and the guy in the booth was clearly subbing for the guy who actually makes the replica, but he was doing his best to describe stuff for me and two other people, when he looked up and said, "And there's the man now," and I thought he meant the guy who made the little replica, so I turned to my right with a polite smile and looked straight into Terry Pratchett's face. He was 6" away from me! I freaked, relied on my frozen polite smile, and nodded a greating without doing the fan-squeal. He spent about ten minutes telling the three of us all the nifty details that the replica guy had gotten right, and answering a couple questions, before he left to go wherever he was supposed to be.

And then, when his speech was scheduled (as guest of honor), there was some technical glitch, so he got started about ten minutes late, and so he finished his speech just about at the end of the allotted time, but without any time for fans to ask him questions, so when one of the official folks came to let him know the time was up, there were bunches of people still clamoring to ask him questions. He very politely checked to see if the room was needed for someone else, and when it turned out to be unneeded for another half hour, he said he was staying to answer questions until the next set-up started, to make up for the lost time at the beginning. I thought that was really quite considerate of his fans.

I didn't get any books signed at that conference, but I vaguely recall that there were serious limits set by the organizers for the major signers. You could have as many books signed as you wanted, BUT you could only have two at a time signed, and then had to go to the back of the line.

JD

PeeDee
02-25-2007, 04:34 AM
You beat me to it. I was about to come in and say how nice Terry Pratchett was. I don't know, maybe it's just British writers. Both him and Neil Gaiman (and, in a big shaggy way, Alan Moore) are sweet, gentle, polite men. I point to them as the way all writers should act in public.

If he seemed crabby on TV (which, to be fair, he does) it's because so frequently, the interviewer is an absolute twit. He's being very patient, really.

ShapeSphere
02-25-2007, 04:41 AM
JanDarby & PeeDee - that's good to hear. :D The TV show was probably a one-off and we all have bad days anyway.

pdr
02-25-2007, 09:03 AM
we love him in NZ and he's been several times. He's always been very patient.

Of course we have special links to all his Disc world books as the Morepork in Ankh-Morepork is in fact our little native owl.

I'm told - but I don't know if I've got the right end of the story - that TP thought it a hoot (yes, intentional pun!) that this very appealling and long legged little owl flew about really crying 'More Pork!'

startwearingpurple
02-26-2007, 11:17 PM
did anyone see the tv movie of hogfather?
i thought it was really good

PeeDee
02-27-2007, 03:21 AM
did anyone see the tv movie of hogfather?
i thought it was really good

I saw it just the other night. It was really good. I enjoyed it immensely. It reminded me very strongly of a really good adaptation of "A Christmas Carole," (less because of the plot and more because of the feel of the thing.)

The actor they had playing Nobby Nobbs was...er...slimey and creepy. He was so cool. And I do not have a crush on Susan now. :D

MMcC
02-27-2007, 04:39 AM
*puffing out chest*

I was a charter member of the Klatchian Foreign Legion (the US fan club).

And during college I actually played Cripple Mister Onion with friends using an old Italian tarot deck and rules that used to be on Alt Fan... I always hoped he put out a deck with really cool Josh Kirby illustrations!

PeeDee
02-27-2007, 04:41 AM
Saying "cool" AND "Josh Kirby" is kind of redundant... :)

I didn't know there was a Klatchian Foreign Legion in the US. That's awesome. I should join them, by jingo!

startwearingpurple
02-27-2007, 11:19 PM
ya i really liked the movie i felt it was very well done i really liked teatime in it. i watched the making too that was class.

and i prefere the new cartoonist. the art of the discworld is a great book

JeanneTGC
03-01-2007, 09:02 AM
I want more of Cohen and the Silver Hoarde. And I want it now. *sigh* Not gonna get it now, but a girl can dream.

Doctor Shifty
03-14-2007, 04:33 PM
Terry Pratchett wrote a book when he was 17 called Carpet People which was in very limited publication. When he was 41 or something he rewrote it and it was published in that form. It made me wonder what bits were left over from the first writing. It's about the tiny people who live in the lower levels of domestic carpet and has some very insightful comments about war.

And me being an Aussie it was inevitable that I read the one which he pretends is not about Australia, complete with his full revelation of the origin of Vegemite.

His writing is funny, but he tends to finish a book as most people finish a chapter. I wonder what's going to happen next but there is no next.

I've seen him interviewed, complete with signature broad brimmed hat in the TV studio, and he comes across as very charming and personable. Says he sees his work as doing for fantasy what Douglas Adams did for sci-fi.

Spiny Norman
03-22-2007, 11:17 PM
Seconding the massive Pratchett love.

As Gaiman put it, in Pratchett's first books the story follows the jokes, whereas in the recent ones the jokes follow the stories. Interpret that as you will...

I definitely suggest Small Gods, Mort, or Good Omens. Good Omens has become my family's personal favorite book. It's the sort of thing you have to read in one go.

JeanneTGC
03-29-2007, 09:59 PM
I saw someone reading, and clearly enjoying, Jingo while I was at our Mazda dealership getting one of our cars serviced. Showing amazing personal restraint, I didn't accost the young man and ask him how many of the Discworld books he'd read, nor get into the debate over which book is best.

This is the first time I've ever seen someone reading Pratchett (who wasn't someone I'd given one of his books to) so I'm even prouder of my self-control. :D

PeeDee
03-29-2007, 10:01 PM
I went bonkers when someone brought in books to sell to my used bookstore, and they brought in not only fifty or sixty great sci-fi fantasy books, but also thirteen various Discworld books. It means that I have a copy of Mort under the counter with a bookmark in it, that I'm slowly reading and enjoying no end.

plaidearthworm
03-30-2007, 03:36 AM
A thread devoted to Terry Pratchett? Yippee! I'm reading Thud! right now, and it's wonderful, a good Sam Vimes story always brightens my day. Years ago when I first discovered Pratchett, I read 'Feet of Clay.' It was a great intro into Discworld, and later I went back and caught up with what I had missed. Rincewind, Granny Weatherwax and all the rest are excellent, but if I truly want Nirvana, I turn to Vimes, Nobby, Fred Colon, Captain Carrot and the rest of the Watch.

PeeDee
03-30-2007, 07:38 AM
A thread devoted to Terry Pratchett? Yippee! I'm reading Thud! right now, and it's wonderful, a good Sam Vimes story always brightens my day. Years ago when I first discovered Pratchett, I read 'Feet of Clay.' It was a great intro into Discworld, and later I went back and caught up with what I had missed. Rincewind, Granny Weatherwax and all the rest are excellent, but if I truly want Nirvana, I turn to Vimes, Nobby, Fred Colon, Captain Carrot and the rest of the Watch.

I'm the same way. Sam Vimes and his raggy bunch are definitely my favorite, although I just (as in tonight) finished reading Mort, and really enjoyed it. I thought that was one of his best stories.

McDuff
04-09-2007, 03:07 PM
I really enjoy the Watch books, but honestly, I think that Wyrd Sisters, Witches Abroad and Lords and Ladies, taken together, constitute one of the best literary triologies of the late twentieth century, and I'm not even half joking.

The later witches books are among the weakest in the series, but the first three are spectacular. I think that the flatness of the later books is actually a symptom is the fact that the initial triology was so well constructed and ended so well that reviving it was almost a "done for the sake of" thing. The epic tale of Magrat's journey from bony young girl to Queen (which was, after all, the real story there) was done. What we were treated to with Maskarade and Carpe Jugglum was a kind of "Further adventures of..." which I really don't think worked as well - in Jugglum, especially, Granny Weatherwax was more of a caricature of herself than a real character.

That is, however, why I really like the Tiffany Aching books. We're treated to a whole new set of characters but they're still up there in Lancre. It's a sort of "Lancre Witches: The Next Generation" but I don't feel it suffers for that, if anything it's breathing new life into the concept.

Incidentally, although Small Gods is great, in my opinion the best stand alone novel out of the entire series is Reaper Man. The writing and story in that one are a cut above the rest, I think it took him until Night Watch to write another individual book that was that good all by itself without the rest of the series to support it.

JeanneTGC
04-10-2007, 04:25 AM
I look at the later witch-centric books as what happens when you do come to the end of "the story" but life still goes on. Magrat's queen, but we were given a new younger witch in Agnes. So they'll have a different flavor because she's a different character from Magrat. But I still love all the witch books.

I love all the books (other than Moving Pictures, no matter how many times I re-read it...but at least it gave us Gaspode, and Thief of Time). Granny Weatherwax is my favorite character, but Rincewind, Death and the Ridcully are right up there.

I do agree that Reaper Man can also stand well on its own and is a great book. (But Small Gods is still the one I point to as "best".)

MMcC
04-10-2007, 07:53 AM
My poor husband was very patient when we started dating all those ages ago. I made him wait nearly 4 months for serious "action," and was very twitchy about being in control in the beginning.

I was infatuated with him from the first SECOND we met, but I knew I was with my "forever" guy on my first trip to his brownstone. He had every Disc novel on the shelf closest to his favorite reading chair. (He also had the dual volume trade paperback editions of Monty Python's ALL THE WORDS.)

No way I was letting him go!

RMS
04-14-2007, 08:07 PM
I haven't read a Terry Pratchett book yet that I didn't absolutely love. I enjoy his books so much! My favorite character is DEATH. He just cracks me up.
Can't think of the name of the books right now but my favorites were the one where Death had to become like Santa Claus, and the one where the elf's name was Elfish Presley...Anyone remember the names ot these? I want to read them again.
I'm so glad to find other people who read him. Most of my friends have never even heard of him.

plaidearthworm
04-16-2007, 07:51 AM
My poor husband was very patient when we started dating all those ages ago. I made him wait nearly 4 months for serious "action," and was very twitchy about being in control in the beginning.

I was infatuated with him from the first SECOND we met, but I knew I was with my "forever" guy on my first trip to his brownstone. He had every Disc novel on the shelf closest to his favorite reading chair. (He also had the dual volume trade paperback editions of Monty Python's ALL THE WORDS.)

No way I was letting him go!

You made a great choice! Always stick with a Python and Pratchett man! When I was dating my future hubby, he introduced me to Monty Python, Star Trek and Led Zeppelin. I never looked back. :)

DragonHeart
07-17-2007, 07:29 AM
It's long overdue, but I've finally gone and ordered a Pratchett book on Amazon. One of the main reasons is this thread actually, and recommendations from friends on another forum. I did buy Good Omens earlier this year and I did enjoy it quite a bit though it's a style I'm not used to reading.

It took me some time to figure out which one but I decided to start with Guards! Guards! It'll probably be the first book I read when I come back from my vacation, as it won't arrive until after I leave.

~DragonHeart~

Esopha
07-20-2007, 06:41 AM
I love, love, love, love, love Terry Pratchett. I read The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents for summer reading simply because I liked the title, and I was hooked. I read the Tiffany series (she's his best female protag, IMO). I read all of them, except for Eric and the one's he's co-written.

My favorite book? Reaper Man. It's absolutely perfect. Absolutely. Perfect. I can analyze the crap out of that book, just as much as Dickens or Steinbeck, and it actually holds up underneath the strain of the analysis. I have a theory that Death and Windle Poons are actual intentional FOILs of one another, providing insight into the other character. OMG and Death of Rats! :D

You must read the book. Read. The. Book.

Oh, and I love Havelock Vetinari. (Sexiest fictional man alive. Or...whatever.) Especially when paired against Sam Vimes. They're so similar, and so different...and they create happy fun love when they face off.

Heeheehee. *squees and runs off*

maxmordon
07-20-2007, 10:33 AM
Well, I started in a weird order. First Mort and then Small Gods; when you live here and you are seeking Discworld novels in pretty much like hunting or like if you are seeking the bloody Maltese Falcon. Seems to be that the publishing in Spanish of Discworld novels has being troublesome (two publishing houses went bankrupt and the current one misspelled Discworld (Mundodisco) for Visionworld (Mundovision) and the translations don't make justice to Prattchet

(It also really hard to find Prattchet's books in English. Most English libraries prefer more "serious" themes like The Da Vinci Code)

Dad says he used to have the first ten books, but that grandma threw it :( but he brought me Mort from New York and that was the first one I read (In English)

And I was lucky to find Small Gods in Spanish in a library in Caracas

Why are the US covers so ugly? the Spanish editions use the British ones and are so lovely. But the US ones seems to be quite lazy...

P.S: An English library managed to find me the 4 last books. Yay!!!

Rosamund
07-20-2007, 05:39 PM
Can't think of the name of the books right now but my favorites were the one where Death had to become like Santa Claus, and the one where the elf's name was Elfish Presley...Anyone remember the names ot these? I want to read them again.

Death becoming like Santa Claus is Hogfather, which has one of the funniest comments on haute cuisine that I've seen.
I don't know the other one, unless you are thinking of the character of Imp Y Celyn (which I think translates as 'Bud Holly') and his 'Music With Rocks In It' band in Soul Music

Hisa Rania
07-25-2007, 07:25 AM
Oh, Pratchett-lovers, I knew I'd find them amongst a nattering flock of writers~

In a testament to my endless obsessesive streak, while the first book I picked up was "The Last Continent", when I noticed that it was not the first in the series, I promptly dropped it like a hot coal and went in search of "The Color of Magic". Once that one left us with Rincewind and Twoflower plummeting off the edge of the disc, I was hooked.

Sadness, but I'll have to agree with the half of the board that hold "Reaper Man" as the best stand alone (though I'm really fond of "Monsterous Regiment" too. It does have the Watch, but they're not the focus). My favorite though is still "Feet of Clay", because I'm a sycophantic lover of all things Robo-Cop~

My sister, a die-hard Harry Potter fan, has refused to read any of Pratchett books for nearly seven years, but I recently made a hostage deal with her to trade one of mine for one of hers. I gave her "Mort" which she read and promptly returned with a demand for more, more, more. She's yet to hold me to my part of the bargain (thankfully), mwaha~

maxmordon
07-26-2007, 11:19 AM
Woohoo! In my usual book hunting through unholy lands outside my dominions I found the two first books of the Bromeliad!

SecretScribe
07-26-2007, 12:35 PM
HUGE fan here too! My favourite characters are definitely Death and Vetinary and I really enjoy the wizzards and witches. I have loved every one of his books and reread them regularly, but I think my favourite would have to be Soul Music. That is of the Pterry only ones. Good Omens is just the best thing ever, ever. I haven't read much Neil Gaiman, but did enjoy Neverland a lot.

Pterry is THE BEST!

Storm Surge
07-26-2007, 05:35 PM
I love Sam Vimes!!!!! (Please note five exclamation marks, a sure sign of insanity.)
Unfortunately, I haven't read the first Diskworld book because my library has this stupid rule that it won't buy any books published more than ten years ago, and I haven't been able to get my hands on a copy yet. :cry:
Death is my second favorite character. I really like how Prachett handles people dying. You don't feel so bad when a character you like croaks, then they sit up and someone says behind them, HELLO.

Vincent
07-26-2007, 07:45 PM
Unfortunately, I haven't read the first Diskworld book because my library has this stupid rule that it won't buy any books published more than ten years ago, and I haven't been able to get my hands on a copy yet.

Odd policy. Do they have a big bonfire at the start of the year to burn all the books that have reached 'retirement' age?

Shweta
07-26-2007, 08:38 PM
Unfortunately, I haven't read the first Diskworld book because my library has this stupid rule that it won't buy any books published more than ten years ago, and I haven't been able to get my hands on a copy yet. :cry:

The Colour of Magic is kind of a disappointment to a lot of people who read Discworld. It's just... not as good as the later books. It's fun and all, but one I don't choose to reread.

That said, you can buy a used copy online for two bucks (http://www.alibris.com/search/books/qwork/7847376/used/Color%20of%20Magic). :)

Storm Surge
07-26-2007, 09:18 PM
Odd policy. Do they have a big bonfire at the start of the year to burn all the books that have reached 'retirement' age?
They only keep books that have been checked out a certain number of times. The rest are discarded. If this tells you anything, the library director drives a red sports car. Not your normal librarian type.

Storm Surge
07-26-2007, 09:23 PM
The Colour of Magic is kind of a disappointment to a lot of people who read Discworld. It's just... not as good as the later books. It's fun and all, but one I don't choose to reread.

That said, you can buy a used copy online for two bucks (http://www.alibris.com/search/books/qwork/7847376/used/Color%20of%20Magic). :)
Two bucks? Hmm... *reaches for wallet*
The main reason I want to read it is that I've read the second one, and there's nothing weirder than reading a book that starts with a cliff hanger when you never saw the characters fall off the cliff in the first place.
It's really hard to read the Rincewind series out of order.

plaidearthworm
07-26-2007, 11:11 PM
It had been a while since I read the first Tiffany Aching book, but I just read A Hatful of Sky and Wintersmith back-to-back, and they were incredible! Loved meeting some of the other witches, and the storyline of Tiffany has plenty of room for future books.

JeanneTGC
08-02-2007, 12:06 AM
The Colour of Magic is kind of a disappointment to a lot of people who read Discworld. It's just... not as good as the later books. It's fun and all, but one I don't choose to reread.

That said, you can buy a used copy online for two bucks (http://www.alibris.com/search/books/qwork/7847376/used/Color%20of%20Magic). :)
It was the first Discworld book I read. I bought it and the Light Fantastic together as a set. Read them both without stopping and have never looked back. For years when a new Discworld book came out I would re-read the entire series from start to newest, in order. I haven't done for a couple of years now, but think that I must again, because, well, the books are great, EVEN and in some ways especially The Colour of Magic. :D

SecretScribe
08-09-2007, 03:17 PM
I have just re-read Mort and had forgotten how brilliant it is. This is definitely a not to be missed one!! Well, actually they all are. :D

JeanneTGC
08-09-2007, 08:29 PM
Totally agree! Even the Discworld books I don't care for (all possibly 3 of them) are better than a lot of other stuff out there. And the ones I do care for (all the rest of them) are just totally brilliant.

swvaughn
08-09-2007, 08:38 PM
Have I already posted my undying love for Terry Pratchett in this thread?

Probably. But it wouldn't hurt to do it again.

I got three words: Where's My Cow?

BWAH-hahahahahahahahahaha!!!! I want a Lord Veternari bumper sticker...

Dawno
08-30-2007, 01:14 AM
I belong to the Discworld Monthly Yahoo group. In the recently received newsletter (where the writer talks about being an extra in the filming of The Colour of Magic) They posted the Pratchett book tour dates for the upcoming Making Money (available per Amazon on Sept. 19th):

Monday, September 24
07:00 PM
BORDERS #86
3700 Torrance Blvd Torrance, CA 90503

Tuesday, September 25
07:30 PM
KEPLER'S BOOKS
STE 200 1010 El Camino Menlo Park, CA 94025

Wednesday, September 26
07:00 PM
POWELL'S BOOKSTORE
3415 SW Cedar Hills Blvd Beaverton, OR 97005

Thursday, September 27
07:30 PM
TATTERED COVER BOOK STORE
1628 16th St. Denver, CO 80202

Saturday September 29
Time TK
Terry Pratchett will be on the Mall in Washington DC
Appearing at the National Book Festival
Sponsored by the Library of Congress
Details TK

Sunday, September 30
01:00 PM
Terry Pratchett
CHESTER COUNTY BOOK COMPANY
975 Paoli Pike West Chester, PA 19380

Monday, October 01
07:00 PM
BARNES & NOBLE/Union Square
33 E 17th ST New York, NY 10003

----------

Also this month we can confirm Terry's UK signing tour dates for
Making Money:

Saturday 6th October
The Cheltenham Festival


Monday 8th October
Plymouth : 12.30-1.30
WHSmith
73-75 New George Street
Plymouth
Devon
PL1 1RP


Tuesday 9th October
Bath : Evening
Topping & Co
The Paragon
Bath
BA1 5LS


Thursday 11th October
Nottingham : 5.30pm-6.30pm
Waterstone's
1-5 Bridlesmith Gate
Nottingham
NG1 2GR


Friday 12th October
Cambridge : 1pm
Borders
12-13 Market Street
Cambridge
CB2 3PA


Saturday 13th October
London : 1pm
Forbidden Planet
Shaftesbury Avenue
London
WC2H JR

Dawno
08-30-2007, 01:15 AM
PS - I'm going to try and go to the one in Menlo Park - if you're there, look for me!

JanDarby
08-30-2007, 03:46 AM
Oh, joy -- I thought the new release wasn't until October, and it felt like forever.

JD

Dawno
08-30-2007, 03:51 AM
Maybe it got moved up? I'm pre-ordering anyway and hoping to make it to the signing.

JeanneTGC
08-30-2007, 06:29 AM
Why does pTerry never come to Phoenix? Why?

maxmordon
09-06-2007, 09:11 PM
I just finished The Truth, quite good but I don't know if reading Going Postal or Thief of time (I have bought both)

JeanneTGC
09-06-2007, 09:13 PM
I always try to read them in the order they were written.

Personally, I liked Going Postal better than Thief of Time, but there are plenty of folks who disagree. Just read them both fast and you'll be right. :D

maxmordon
09-06-2007, 09:34 PM
Quite hard here to find Discworld novels, so the four ones that I ordered in a library most be well administrated

J. R. Tomlin
09-08-2007, 01:17 AM
You know he's funny, but I get the feeling he actually dislikes fantasy which bothers me and keeps me from reading him more than I do. That's just my reaction, though.

JeanneTGC
09-08-2007, 03:19 AM
I just think he uses it as a way to show the real world through a prism. I consider him a satirist, much more than a fantasy writer.

maxmordon
09-08-2007, 11:56 AM
I have only read Mort, Small Gods and The Truth but this is my theory:

At the beginning it was more fantasy-oriented satire, more Pseudo-medieval with witches and wizzards but subtly became more and more a satire with our own world with internet, newspapers and social commentaries. You know, more Vimes and less Rincewind...

maxmordon
09-12-2007, 03:43 AM
Woohoo! the Light Fantastic is being adapted for TV with Christopher Lee as The Death!

spacejock2
09-12-2007, 03:30 PM
Odd policy. Do they have a big bonfire at the start of the year to burn all the books that have reached 'retirement' age?

Our local libraries have a stock sell-off now and then. You can pick up hardbacks for $1 each, and somehow I doubt they buy the same titles again. It's one reason you often find books 3, 4, 5 in a series on the shelves and no books 1 & 2.

maxmordon
09-13-2007, 09:58 AM
From the Skyone Website:

CAMERAS ROLL ON TERRY PRATCHETT’S, ‘THE COLOUR OF MAGIC’
SEAN ASTIN, TIM CURRY AND CHRISTOPHER LEE JOIN SIR DAVID JASON IN THE STELLAR CAST OF THE UPCOMING ADAPTATION OF TERRY PRATCHETT’S BELOVED CLASSIC, ‘THE COLOUR OF MAGIC’.

Filming of the epic fantasy is already underway at Londons’ famous Pinewood Studios. Following on the massive success of ’Hogfather’ in December 2006, the BAFTA award winning team of SKY ONE, MOB Film and RHI return to magical Universe for this the second live-action outing of a Pratchett novel.

THE COLOUR OF MAGIC is set to take fans deeper into Discworld than ever before, the story follows the inept wizard Rincewind (Sir David Jason) and Discworld’s first ever tourist, Twoflower (Sean Astin), on the journey of a lifetime; as the duo battle wizards, elude druid mercenaries and ride mythical dragons. But can Rincewind defeat his scheming nemesis Trymon (Tim Curry) and save Discworld from ultimate destruction?

Christopher Lee joins the cast as, the voice of, recurring Discworld favourite Death.

Production on the multi-million pound adaptation commenced on July 23rd with the show set to build on the grand scale and lavish scope seen on the award winning Hogfather. The Colour of Magics’ universe is also more ambitious in its breadth, with the production team determined to bring an even richer Discworld to Sky One screens, with increased prodcution values and ground-breaking CGI work.

Sir David Jason, who is also the executive producer of the films had this to say: “Taking up the role of Rincewind marks the achievement of a career-long ambition for me. It was wonderful to be a part of the success of Hogfather and to be at the heart of this second family oriented adaptation, which is set to be every bit as fun and fulfilling.”

Sean Astin said: “I’m honoured to be given the chance to make the part of Twoflower my own, starring in a fantasy tale that has captured the imagination of millions of people around the world.”

THE COLOUR OF MAGIC is being lovingly brought to life by the production team behind the award winning Hogfater with its screenplay adapted by Director Vadim Jean, once again mucked about with by Terry Pratchett and exec produced by Rod Brown and Ian Sharples for the Mob Film Company. Elaine Pyke and Sarah Conroy executive produce for Sky One and Robert Halmi, Sr and Robert Halmi, Jr are the executive producers for RHI Entertainment.

Get the latest news, interviews and gossip straight form the heart of ‘The Colour Of Magic’ production every week at thebrokendrum.net

Evaine
09-13-2007, 02:47 PM
Lovely as Sean Astin is, Twoflower was first written as a typical 'Japanese' tourist - which kind of became 'China' when Rincewind went to visit Twoflower's home country.
I'm sure he can do innocent and gullible very well though.

SecretScribe
09-19-2007, 04:03 PM
I have just re-read Wyrd Sisters and was struck again at the brilliance of it. All those Shakespeare references...

JanDarby
09-19-2007, 06:28 PM
My bookstore just called to say the new Pratchett has arrived, so I'm outta here in a minute, and I'm spending the whole day reading. Joy!

JD

Shweta
09-22-2007, 02:06 AM
You know he's funny, but I get the feeling he actually dislikes fantasy which bothers me and keeps me from reading him more than I do. That's just my reaction, though.

I know what you mean, but I think that's not quite right. I think what Pratchett despises is generic-fantasy, with its fluffy fairies and unicorns and noble wizards and great and mighty dragons who just happen to love the mary-sue protagonist...

He might also seriously dislike true heroic fantasy, with its truly larger-than-life characters and mythic events - but my feeling it that his satires of those are... kinder. Sort of poking fond fun. While he's utterly merciless about fluffy elves and the like.

When I read it, Lords and Ladies actually shocked me. I don't think I enjoyed it at all the first time through. It poked at too many of my dearest illusions. But reading it changed me, as a reader and as a writer -- I grew more sensitive to the things he was satirizing, and as a result had trouble reading some of the fluff I'd read before. When I read Lords and Ladies again some years later, I fell over laughing.

Monkey
09-22-2007, 05:52 AM
Just popping in to say I love Pratchett's writing.

He's my HERO.

:D

Perks
07-02-2008, 04:22 PM
I don't read much sci-fi or fantasy, but I've heard the name Terry Pratchett - a lot.

A little while back, William posted a clip (http://http://authorscoop.com/?p=313) on AuthorScoop's daily feature, Afternoon Viewing, of Mr. Pratchett discussing his recent diagnosis of Alzheimer's and I found him too adorable not to investigate further.

So, someone lent me the book, Thud.

I've only just started it, but the man's a genius. What a writer. Tell me, what are the essential works of Terry Pratchett?

Sarita
07-02-2008, 04:26 PM
The Discworld series is wonderful.


Oh oh oh! You have to read Good Omens. HAVE TO! I swear. It's a must read! Now!

Marian Perera
07-02-2008, 04:32 PM
I've only just started it, but the man's a genius. What a writer. Tell me, what are the essential works of Terry Pratchett?

My favorite Night Watch novel is Feet of Clay - the mystery is superb, and I love the way all the clues come together at the end. I also enjoyed Going Postal and The Truth, which are standalone Ankh-Morpork novels.

Monstrous Regiment was kind of disappointing. I don't want to give out spoilers, so let's just say that I found the revelations in it very far-fetched. I know the books are humorous fantasy, but one of their strengths is that they're so believable. The characters and events seem real. Unfortunately that wasn't the case for Monstrous Regiment.

I also recommend Truckers - not a Discworld novel, but just as well-written and funny.

Emily Winslow
07-02-2008, 04:39 PM
All the Sam Vimes/Night Watch novels:
Guards! Guards!
Men at Arms
Feet of Clay
Fifth Elephant
Night Watch
Thud!

While I doubt you'll be able to stop yourself from finishing Thud! right now, I recommend reading them in order.

And, oh, "Fifth Elephant" is *spectacular*!

Aw heck--just go get everything he's ever written. No, I'm not kidding.

(Actually, looking back from where his Discworld novels are now, I admit the Rincewind ones pale in comparison. But they're worthwhile nonetheless.)

Perks
07-02-2008, 04:44 PM
I can tell I should probably stop with this one anyway. It's what inspired this thread, because I knew I was out of order. I just immediately loved his writing.

Hmmmmm. Choices, choices.

Marian Perera
07-02-2008, 04:50 PM
Does anyone remember the title of the novel where Colon is put in charge of the watch and everyone goes on strike? I think one of them was chanting, "Colon must go, Colon must go", until the others pointed out that it sounded like they were discussing surgery.

Sarpedon
07-02-2008, 04:52 PM
I think that was fifth elephant, when Vimes went to Uberwald. Carrot left too, for some reason.

And I noticed Jingo! was left out of the City Watch one. A very good one.

And don't forget Hogfather. That is the one that made me laugh the most. Oh my god. What they found in the Dean's hat was the funniest thing ever.

Troo
07-02-2008, 05:10 PM
I loved Hogfather, but always felt it ended 50 pages before it finished.

Feet of Clay is just... utter genius.

Shweta
07-02-2008, 05:21 PM
Don't the witches get any love?

Equal Rites is an old old book, the one where he's finding his feet, IMO. It's got lovely qualities but isn't up to the level of others.

But I adore Wyrd Sisters, like Witches Abroad quite a lot, and am back to love with Lords and Ladies. After which, I'm sort of on an even level of happiness with witch books.


I happen to think that Sourcery is the best of the wizard books, though it's extremely early.

Emily Winslow
07-02-2008, 05:34 PM
Oh yes--those are marvelous too.


Don't the witches get any love?

Equal Rites is an old old book, the one where he's finding his feet, IMO. It's got lovely qualities but isn't up to the level of others.

But I adore Wyrd Sisters, like Witches Abroad quite a lot, and am back to love with Lords and Ladies. After which, I'm sort of on an even level of happiness with witch books.

Troo
07-02-2008, 05:41 PM
Don't the witches get any love?

Equal Rites is an old old book, the one where he's finding his feet, IMO. It's got lovely qualities but isn't up to the level of others.

But I adore Wyrd Sisters, like Witches Abroad quite a lot, and am back to love with Lords and Ladies. After which, I'm sort of on an even level of happiness with witch books.


I happen to think that Sourcery is the best of the wizard books, though it's extremely early.

Ah yes, Lords and Ladies is fantastic!

I loved Sourcery when I first read it back at school. I've not read it since, so I'd have to give it a re-read to see if it holds up these days. I suspect that it will, though.

Sarpedon
07-02-2008, 05:44 PM
I've just reread Men at Arms, its also one of the best. The funniest part was when Vimes was reading the different police reports from his subordinates who had no idea about what a police report should look like.

In fact, whenever Pratchett writes about writing its hilarious. Especially when Vimes himself writes. He talks like a normal person, but when he writes he goes all ren-faire olde english. So hilarious.

JimmyB27
07-02-2008, 06:41 PM
Don't the witches get any love?

Equal Rites is an old old book, the one where he's finding his feet, IMO. It's got lovely qualities but isn't up to the level of others.

But I adore Wyrd Sisters, like Witches Abroad quite a lot, and am back to love with Lords and Ladies. After which, I'm sort of on an even level of happiness with witch books.


I happen to think that Sourcery is the best of the wizard books, though it's extremely early.
The witches ones are my favourites. Nanny Ogg is probably my very favourite character from any book in the history of all time ever. Granny is a very good character too, despite having a very definite whiff of Mary Sue about her.
I like Maskerade a lot, we get to see some of Nanny's hidden depths. She's not just the bumbling old drunk letch people see ("I'm only nice compared to Esme, but so's everyone.")

Dawno
07-02-2008, 06:50 PM
I love the Nac Mac Feegle, so the Tiffany Aching books (Wee Free Men, Hat Full of Sky and Wintersmith) are among my favorites. Terry's new book is titled Nation (http://www.harpercollins.com/books/9780061433016/Nation/index.aspx). It's due in stores in September, and it's not a Discworld book.

Soccer Mom
07-02-2008, 07:05 PM
I love the Nac Mac Feegle, so the Tiffany Aching books (Wee Free Men, Hat Full of Sky and Wintersmith) are among my favorites. Terry's new book is titled Nation (http://www.harpercollins.com/books/9780061433016/Nation/index.aspx). It's due in stores in September, and it's not a Discworld book.

Just saying "ditto". I :heart: the Nac Mac Feegle!

maxmordon
07-02-2008, 07:32 PM
Doesn't Death deserve respect? He appears in all the novels after all!

I recommend Mort and the Reaper Man, who are also great introductions... and Small Gods is a personal favorite that is a standalone set far Ankh-Morpork

So far the only Rincewind book I have read is Eric but it's excellent!

Esopha
07-02-2008, 07:39 PM
Reaper Man! Definitely, definitely Reaper Man. And all the Sam Vimes novels. My two favorite characters are Vimes and Death. They're so believable and magnificently hilarious.

Nakhlasmoke
07-02-2008, 08:43 PM
My faves:

Nightwatch
Pyramids
hogfather
Good Omens (with some unknown writer Neil Gaiman)
Going Postal

Uh...basically any book with the Watch or Vetinari in it, and the Witches books come a close second.

Ones I hated:

Monstrous Regiment. I cannot express how much this book disappointed me.

The early books, while fun and slapstick in their own right, just didn't have the kick the later ones did.

Sophia
07-02-2008, 09:19 PM
I'm re-reading the Watch books right now, as they're my favourites, but all of Pratchett's Discworld novels are comfort reads for me. I ditto the recommendation for the Watch books (Guards! Guards!, Men at Arms, Feet of Clay, Jingo, The Fifth Elephant, Night Watch, Thud!) The Witches books are excellent, too (Equal Rites, Wyrd Sisters, Witches Abroad, Lords and Ladies, Maskerade, Carpe Jugulum). I envy you reading them for the first time. :)

Kitty Pryde
07-02-2008, 10:22 PM
Good Omens is my number one most often read book. All my friends have read it and I have read it at least 30 times. It's sort of one sweet chapter by pratchett, followed by one evil chapter by neil gaiman, alternating until the end of the book. Gaiman turns an entire telemarketing call center staff into maggots, Pratchett lovingly turns them back into people. Love it!
Also love love love Guards! Guards! and Soul Music and Men at Arms. Aw, they're basically all genius and infinitely rereadable. His early stuff is underrated I think, especially the 'Johnny' trilogy and the Truckers-Diggers-Wings trilogy. When I was younger I drove myself nuts trying to get all his stuff that was published in the UK but not here in the states. You kids today have it easier because it's all been published in the US now!

maxmordon
07-02-2008, 11:24 PM
Good Omens is my number one most often read book. All my friends have read it and I have read it at least 30 times. It's sort of one sweet chapter by pratchett, followed by one evil chapter by neil gaiman, alternating until the end of the book. Gaiman turns an entire telemarketing call center staff into maggots, Pratchett lovingly turns them back into people. Love it!
Also love love love Guards! Guards! and Soul Music and Men at Arms. Aw, they're basically all genius and infinitely rereadable. His early stuff is underrated I think, especially the 'Johnny' trilogy and the Truckers-Diggers-Wings trilogy. When I was younger I drove myself nuts trying to get all his stuff that was published in the UK but not here in the states. You kids today have it easier because it's all been published in the US now!

Even harder to find some of his books in Venezuela...

Shweta
07-02-2008, 11:52 PM
You kids today have it easier because it's all been published in the US now!

Heh, imagine moving from the UK to the US about five years before he got popular over here. After you'd started getting the books in hardback.
That drove me well up the wall. Lack of Pratchett and of Iain Banks.

Nakhlasmoke
07-03-2008, 08:15 AM
... It's sort of one sweet chapter by pratchett, followed by one evil chapter by neil gaiman, alternating until the end of the book. ...

Is it chapter by chapter though? I thought by the end of it they could barely tell who had written what.

I love it for the William-flavour. Okay, now I want to go dig up all my William books....

Kitty Pryde
07-03-2008, 08:21 AM
Is it chapter by chapter though? I thought by the end of it they could barely tell who had written what.



It is somewhat mixed up, true, but all the really vile bits are gaiman, and all the really touching precious bits are pratchett.

TrickyFiction
07-03-2008, 08:50 AM
Hogfather is on my list to read. Good Omens too.
I'm so excited to read them. Good to hear they were enjoyable.

Buddikins
07-03-2008, 12:24 PM
READ THEM ALL.

First the Watch ones, of course.

Then just go nuts.

Have fun.

Shweta
07-03-2008, 01:48 PM
READ THEM ALL.

Tsk.
You forgot "THEN READ THEM AGAIN." And "seeya next year" :D

Buddikins
07-12-2008, 05:18 PM
Tsk.
You forgot "THEN READ THEM AGAIN." And "seeya next year" :D

I'm so embarrassed.. :e2smack: How can anyone take me seriously now?

Shadow_Ferret
07-12-2008, 06:51 PM
I asked this same question last year.

Here's my thread with it's responses.

http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=54914

Hope that helps.

plaidearthworm
07-12-2008, 09:19 PM
My first Pratchett was Men at Arms; I loved it so much, I went back to the beginning of the series and worked my way through from there. Reading the early books helps you to catch those little in-jokes that happen in later works. Fact is, Terry Pratchett has a better batting average than any other author, IMHO; only a couple of his books are shaky, but the rest are gold.

Vincent
07-12-2008, 09:25 PM
My first Pratchett was Truckers. Because, well, I found the Discworld series a bit overwhelming and didn't know where the hell to start. But was all good, 'cos Truckers was a lot of fun.

Reilly616
07-12-2008, 10:12 PM
My first Pratchett book was The Fifth Elephant. Since then I've bought them all. Brilliant writer.

ynoirb
07-22-2008, 06:21 AM
Going Postal is one of the funniest books I've ever read. Making Money is also really good, I'm a fan of Moist :)

Granny Weatherwax is possibly my favourite character though. Witches Abroard = awesome!

Shweta
07-22-2008, 06:42 AM
My first Pratchett was Truckers. Because, well, I found the Discworld series a bit overwhelming and didn't know where the hell to start. But was all good, 'cos Truckers was a lot of fun.

Why do they call it "road works" if the road doesn't work?
:D

Danger Jane
07-22-2008, 07:57 AM
I really liked The Last Hero, although the illustrations might have had something to do with it? They're gorgeous.

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0060507772.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

ivorywhisper
07-24-2008, 11:19 PM
I don't read much sci-fi or fantasy, but I've heard the name Terry Pratchett - a lot.



So, someone lent me the book, Thud.

I've only just started it, but the man's a genius. What a writer. Tell me, what are the essential works of Terry Pratchett?

Pratchett is excellent, one of my favourites!! I dont know which order to tell you to read them in :) because well, I pretty much read them in the order in which I can lay my hands on them. I've just finished reading "Going Postal". I'll probably pick up "Making money" next.

You'd probably like "Eric", it's a quick read. Another one I love is "Guards! Guards!"

I have noticed that Pratchett fans seem to go for books which have certain characters in them after a while. I'm a big fan of "Death" and "Death of rats", hehe. My husband likes anything that has the Watch in it and one of my friends loves Rincewind. I can only hope that I'll write with half Pratchett's talent some day :)

Yeshanu
07-25-2008, 10:05 AM
Oh oh oh! You have to read Good Omens. HAVE TO! I swear. It's a must read! Now!

Absolutely, 100% agree!

maxmordon
07-25-2008, 04:59 PM
So, far I have (but haven't read) Carpe Jugulum, The Thief of Time, A Hat Full of Sky, Witches Abroad, Soul Music and Moving Pictures...

I can't just decide which one continue!

pdr
07-25-2008, 05:29 PM
...a word of praise for Monstrous Regiment. It's a very serious book really. Suggest you read the song 'Sweet Polly Oliver' and then consider the book a feminist treatise on war! :)

maxmordon
07-25-2008, 05:37 PM
...a word of praise for Monstrous Regiment. It's a very serious book really. Suggest you read the song 'Sweet Polly Oliver' and then consider the book a feminist treatise on war! :)


Most fans seems to hate it, is one the lowest, if not the lowest, rated Discworld books

Sarpedon
07-25-2008, 08:37 PM
It was the first one I read, actually. Confused the hell out of me. It isn't as funny as the other ones, except for Nuggan.

Perks
07-25-2008, 09:32 PM
I have an amazon gift certificate and I can't figure out what to do with it. You people are either no help or too much help!

Sarita
07-25-2008, 10:10 PM
I wasn't joking about Good Omens. Get it! Now! Or I wont come see you in September :D

Okay, I'm kidding.... maybe.

Perks
07-25-2008, 10:47 PM
Is it a stand alone? Will it make sense? And don't threaten me, woman!

maxmordon
07-25-2008, 11:28 PM
Is not part of Discworld. Instead is some sort of parody of The Omen co-written with Neil Gaiman (or so I heard)

Sarpedon
07-25-2008, 11:49 PM
If you need help, I agree with others who have said that the Guards series is the best.

I found this link! It should be of great help to you. Its the Discworld Flow Chart!

http://www.lspace.org/books/reading-order-guides/the-discworld-reading-order-guide-1-5.pdf

ivorywhisper
07-26-2008, 06:47 PM
If you need help, I agree with others who have said that the Guards series is the best.

I found this link! It should be of great help to you. Its the Discworld Flow Chart!

http://www.lspace.org/books/reading-order-guides/the-discworld-reading-order-guide-1-5.pdf

That was a very good chart!! I've read most of them, I can't wait to start "Making money".

Sarita
07-26-2008, 07:31 PM
Is it a stand alone? Will it make sense? And don't threaten me, woman!
Yes, it's entirely stand alone. And so freaking funny you'll be peeing your pants with laughter. (Okay, that's not so funny, but the book really is.)

I'll stop threatening you when you read the damn book!

Perks
07-26-2008, 07:40 PM
I'm gonna order it now. But only because you shouted the loudest. And now you're charges with getting The Gunseller by Hugh Laurie. One of my alltime favorite books. Do it. Do it now.

Broadswordbabe
07-27-2008, 01:04 AM
...a word of praise for Monstrous Regiment.
Seconded, thirded and fourthed. OK it's not as laugh-out-loud funny as some, but it's a wonderful book with great characters and a serious message, and how can you not adore the concept of 'Socks appeal'?

Broadswordbabe
07-27-2008, 01:06 AM
Oh and all world leaders should be forced to read Jingo before declaring war on anyone. It's howlingly funny, but also one of the best anti-war books I've ever read, though I suspect works best if you've read the previous 'City Watch' novels, because you know the characters better and are more emotionally involved.

Ageless Stranger
07-27-2008, 01:22 AM
The Watch series is essential and Reaper Man may just be one of the best books I've ever read.

"WHAT CAN THE HARVEST HOPE FOR, IF NOT FOR THE CARE OF THE REAPER MAN?"

pdr
07-28-2008, 03:58 AM
I don't give a damn!

Most fans seems to hate it, is one the lowest, if not the lowest, rated Discworld books

I am not most fans and I see it as part of his later works where he is becoming much more satirist than fantasist and has the skills to do it well.

I found 'Thud' difficult on first reading too, but a second reading made me add it to the favourites list. He's not a fast read any more, he requires thoughtful reading.

Straka
07-28-2008, 05:18 AM
So, someone lent me the book, Thud.

I just picked that up too, its my first Pratchett novel as well.

Renfaery
07-29-2008, 06:34 AM
Hogfather
Reaper Man
Night Watch
Monstrous Regiment

^^^^^^^^^^^^ My favorites

maxmordon
07-29-2008, 12:49 PM
What? No Mort? it was the first Discworld novel I read! and I liked more than Reaper Man. All the Death novels are great

Renfaery
07-30-2008, 01:08 AM
I haven't read Mort yet ^^

Hogfather was my first, and Death has been my favorite character ever since.

JimmyB27
10-08-2009, 02:27 AM
Anyone else got the latest Discworld novel yet?
I'm about three quarters of the way through, and I gotta tell you, I'm pretty disappointed. :(
Doesn't read like a Pratchett novel; feels very forced. One of my favourite things about TP's books is the depth of the characters, and the way they react exactly as...well, as they would according to their character. The characters in this book feel like they're being shoehorned into the plot somehow. Plus, there's a lot of info-dumpy speeches from various characters, the odd 'As you know, Bob', and a lot of untidy run-on sentences.
I can't help wonder how much of this has been influenced by his illness. Hope the next one is better.

Kitty Pryde
11-06-2009, 09:35 PM
Just started it this morning. I'm loving it! A few pages in I was thinking to myself, the dude's still got it. I mean come on, look at this bit, describing someone's bed:


Usually there is, on the pillow, a very elderly teddy bear called Mr. Wobble.

Traditionally, in the lexicon of pathos, such a bear should have only one eye, but as the result of a childhood error in Glinda's sewing, he has three, and is more enlightened than the average bear.

There are like five jokes there, crammed into two sentences. Also, he has made a Hinduism/Yogi Bear joke in a book set in a universe which has neither Hindus nor Yogi Bear, and without even going for the obvious "yogi" pun, which is an extremely difficult feat. No, he's still got it.

JimmyB27
11-10-2009, 05:12 PM
Just started it this morning. I'm loving it! A few pages in I was thinking to myself, the dude's still got it. I mean come on, look at this bit, describing someone's bed:


There are like five jokes there, crammed into two sentences. Also, he has made a Hinduism/Yogi Bear joke in a book set in a universe which has neither Hindus nor Yogi Bear, and without even going for the obvious "yogi" pun, which is an extremely difficult feat. No, he's still got it.
The thing I've always liked best about Pratchett's work is not the jokes, but the depth and strength of his characters. None of the characters in this book struck me as anything more than 2d cardboard cutouts. Even the ones I've enjoyed in previous books, like Ricdully and Stibbons, felt like they'd been shoe-horned into behaviours that weren't their own, but were needed to advance the plot.

Angie
11-16-2009, 02:30 AM
Much as it pains me, I have to agree that Ridcully, in particular, doesn't seem the same as he did in earlier books. I'll agree that the humor is still there, but the characters I've known and loved through all of his previous work don't quite "feel" right in UA.

Kitty Pryde
11-16-2009, 03:18 AM
I just finished it this week. It totally worked for me. Ponder is always Ponder...the other wizards always seem to have a sort of communal personality to me. I thought the new characters were all pretty well-written. Especially Nutt. I love him :)

Menyanthana
01-01-2010, 12:56 AM
I think it's pretty good. And I liked Nutt.

However, the "German" book titles which were quoted by Nutt did hurt my eyes. Pratchett should have changed the language more, so it wouldn't have been recognizable German any more, or he should have done it right.

It's not that hard to find a native speaker, isn't it?