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Project nachonaco
10-14-2006, 05:27 AM
So I asked my lovely mother if she'd read some of my novel.

She did.

She kicked the crap out of it, editing-wise, but that's not important.

I asked her if I could read some of the stuff she wrote in college.

She said no.

I asked why.

"Because your writing kind of...puts mine to shame."

:D

Jongfan
10-14-2006, 05:32 AM
How sad. A mother should encourage not try to outdo. My 13 year old daughter told me last week that she wants to try writing a book, I was so proud. She asked me to read what she has written so far. I did not want to discourage her at all so I took it easy with my critiquing. It was pretty well thought out, she has the body of the story laid out, just needs a little more of her blood , sweat and tears. I can not imagine telling her anything negative for fear she would not use her imagination anymore.

Project nachonaco
10-14-2006, 05:32 AM
Well, it's easier for me to take advice from her than an agent, I suppose.

I just thought that I made her embarrassed was cool. :D

icerose
10-14-2006, 05:51 AM
How sad. A mother should encourage not try to outdo. My 13 year old daughter told me last week that she wants to try writing a book, I was so proud. She asked me to read what she has written so far. I did not want to discourage her at all so I took it easy with my critiquing. It was pretty well thought out, she has the body of the story laid out, just needs a little more of her blood , sweat and tears. I can not imagine telling her anything negative for fear she would not use her imagination anymore.

But don't over feed the ego because an outside person can deflate it with a couple of words and hurt her more deeply. I wouldn't let her off easy per say but I wouldn't slam the hammer down either. You know your daughter, and you should know how to encourage imagination without letting things slide. You won't be doing her any favors in the long run if she doesn't work on improving her writing simply because you say it's perfect. But you can encourage her imagination while showing her how to improve her writing. If you can manage it, she will be all the better for it.

:Soapbox: Okay I'm off.

And I find that cute, Nachonaco. I hope she finds courage in her own writing though.

Jongfan
10-14-2006, 05:57 AM
But don't over feed the ego because an outside person can deflate it with a couple of words and hurt her more deeply. I wouldn't let her off easy per say but I wouldn't slam the hammer down either. You know your daughter, and you should know how to encourage imagination without letting things slide. You won't be doing her any favors in the long run if she doesn't work on improving her writing simply because you say it's perfect. But you can encourage her imagination while showing her how to improve her writing. If you can manage it, she will be all the better for it.

:Soapbox: Okay I'm off.

And I find that cute, Nachonaco. I hope she finds courage in her own writing though.

I appreciate that, believe me, I have always been very honest with her while encouraging her creativity. I call her my free spirit because she has such a unique way of seeing things. I told her to think about all the books she has enjoyed, then think of why she enjoyed them. I would never tell her it was perfect just to save her feelings. I suggested she try to write a way that her readers can relate to the situation. She is targeting teen readers. I suggested a course next summer for writing she may take at the local college. I want to give her the tools to succeed.
When I said a mother should encourage her child, I meant in a possitive way.

The_Merf
10-15-2006, 07:33 AM
I love the fact that my mother will tear my stuff apart. I know she loves me and isn't going to consider all her years of raising me a waste if I toss in a few clunkers here and there, so I encourage her to have at it.

Nothing is better than knowing I can show my ms. to someone I trust more than just about anyone (thus the safety factor encourages me to write so I can show her things) and if she says she likes it, she means it. I don't have to ask "is she just being nice?" because I know that when she doesn't like something, she will tell me! :)

Then again, I'm in my twenties, which does make a difference.

Maryn
10-16-2006, 06:33 PM
Personally, after one outing I never ask friends or family for their input. I bet my sister didn't really love my first novel (god, how could she, since it was horrible?) but she claimed to, because that's what supportive family does.

None of my friends or family is actually qualified to give in-depth critique (although they could certainly catch a mistake or tell me they just didn't like something), and it puts them in an awkward spot, not wanting to hurt me.

Now I only let people who know what they're doing around a critique, and who aren't obligated to protect my widdle feewings, read my work. It's better for it, too.

Maryn, whose husband was scared to death to offer a suggestion

scottVee
10-17-2006, 01:24 PM
It's very nice to hear about people helping their children learn to write, or to appreciate writing. Way to go, and it's probably a delicate balance.

I can only imagine what a supportive family would have been like; sometimes I think I'd be 10 years further along if they had shown any interest at all.

Somehow I got over rejection and "business as usual" a long time ago, and now I even look forward to readings and open mike events. But there's always going to be that void.

icerose
10-17-2006, 07:10 PM
Ok, I'm jealous of you guys. My mother won't even read my stuff. She read the first chapter and said 'hmm, it's not very cheerful, is it?' and won't read any more. Er, HELLO! I'm not writing a joke book! Argh. Winds me up every time I think of it ...

I wouldn't let that bother you, it's probably not her genre.

You should hear my mother if you think that's bad. When I write any of my horror stuff (I have since stopped telling her about it) she freaks out, and says "Ew, ew, ew, why do you write such stuff? Why don't you write a nice story."

I just laugh at it because I find it rather funny. She doesn't say any of it to put me down or my writing, she is just adverse to any characters experiencing any pain or fear and whatnot. So I just tell her my "nice" fantasy ideas and leave out the darker details. ;)

Tiger
10-19-2006, 03:57 AM
So I asked my lovely mother if she'd read some of my novel.

She did.

She kicked the crap out of it, editing-wise, but that's not important.

I asked her if I could read some of the stuff she wrote in college.

She said no.

I asked why.

"Because your writing kind of...puts mine to shame."

:D

Lovely mother indeed. That's a great story.

-D