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View Full Version : High IQ: why am I a putz?



C.bronco
10-09-2006, 05:59 AM
Supposedly, I should be very successful. Sadly, I'm not.
I'm lacking in clues.
I need a new job and an agent.
Please send wisdom, stat.

A. Hamilton
10-09-2006, 06:01 AM
define success.

C.bronco
10-09-2006, 06:05 AM
Doing what it is that you love to do, and getting paid for it.

Rolling Thunder
10-09-2006, 06:05 AM
Clues? Um....Mystery Forum should have those. Alas, words of the wise, I have not. Wise *** remarks though, my cup runneth over.:)

C.bronco
10-09-2006, 06:06 AM
Mystery forum has clues???? How do I get there?!

C.bronco
10-09-2006, 06:09 AM
P.S. I will buy slightly used cluesticks. I have no pride.

C.bronco
10-09-2006, 06:11 AM
I could retitle this past as "Bronco Unhinged." Perhaps it's too melodramatic.

Rolling Thunder
10-09-2006, 06:12 AM
Go quietly past Novels.....laugh loudly as you pass Humor...run like the dickens past Pagan Chat.....and Mystery should be towards your right.


Oh, and take a second or two to peek in on Erotica. It's always worth a look.

veinglory
10-09-2006, 06:18 AM
Just, whatever you do, don't walk into erotic carrying cluesticks. They have creative uses for them in there.

poetinahat
10-09-2006, 06:25 AM
If you want success, stay well away from Poetry. We all just end up happy, pointless lotus-eaters.

Besides, we're all booked up. (Aw, I'm sure we can make room.)

Cluesticks are powerless there, though. BYO navel for gazing.

Rolling Thunder
10-09-2006, 06:26 AM
ooooooooohhhhhhhhhh.......I hope I have an extension cord long enough to reach.

**scampers off towards erotica**

veinglory
10-09-2006, 06:29 AM
Show ID at the door, check inhibitions with the bunnygrrl.

icerose
10-09-2006, 06:30 AM
Studies actually show that those with higher IQ's are less likely to succeed.

1) They lack the discipline to succeed because everything came so easy for them so they never worked on it.

2) They procrastinate.

3) They are indecisive.

4) They succumb to depression when things don't move quickly and they don't want to actually work on it to get it.

I've seen it all over in my family although mostly in the top three reasons verses the fourth.

JDCrayne
10-09-2006, 06:31 AM
Doing what it is that you love to do, and getting paid for it.

I think it was Joseph Campbell who said, "Follow your joy." Before you get to joy, you're going to have to put up with a lot of just-acceptable.

I know people who tested out at the top ten percent of Mensa, and they have just as hard a time scraping up a fingernail full of success as anybody else. If it's any consolation, you're not alone.

veinglory
10-09-2006, 06:32 AM
I have a D-class ceritifcate authorising me to administer standardised IQ tests and they first thing they taught me about them was that they are 95% bunk ;)

Rolling Thunder
10-09-2006, 06:37 AM
Did we cheer Bronco up or scare her off?

poetinahat
10-09-2006, 06:41 AM
(scene: Batman tv set)

It's a setup... wait! The vents are closing! What's that funny smell? AAAAAAAAA*klunk*

Bartholomew
10-09-2006, 07:15 AM
Supposedly, I should be very successful. Sadly, I'm not.
I'm lacking in clues.
I need a new job and an agent.
Please send wisdom, stat.

I have an IQ of 140~. Its never done me any good.

Zisel
10-09-2006, 08:25 AM
veinglory:

they are 95% bunk
But wouldn’t you say they test something? There is a difference between 70 and 170.

Anyway, to the OP, it's like what icerose was referring to, there's supposedly an optimal IQ and beyond a certain point you start having problems. I've heard a range from 120 to 150. Even so, IQ's just one factor in how a person's life turns out.

icerose:

They succumb to depression
Often existential depression. At ridiculously early ages.

Somewhere out there in Internetland is a casual analysis of chess champions that suggests extra brain capacity is often used for worry.

Just in case you really are feeling frustrated, you might want to visit the SENG forum (http://www.sengifted.org/community/index.php?showforum=11)s

Oh and Christopher Coulson has some articles on the challenges of being gifted (http://www.santafecoach.com/gchallenges.htm) that are very...interesting. "Non-achievment" tops the list, I might add.

Hope you feel better soon. :Hug2:

Oh heck, I forgot the requisite wise*ss comment. Sorry, I'm slow, I've been up all night.

Edit: Hey, etymologically speaking, you're a jewel! (See where I'm going with this? Putz>schmuck>family jewels? [Such language! Back to the erotica board we go.] Does this count as a wise*ss comment? Okay, time for bed.)

Z

BottomlessCup
10-09-2006, 08:36 AM
Matt Groening said, "Happiness in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know."

My personal experience has suggested that to be true. IMO, it's because life is inherently disappointing and sad. The smarter you are, the more acutely you understand that fact.

Leva
10-09-2006, 08:46 AM
I have an IQ that's tested at 150+.

I'm convinced 'social skills' are far more important than IQ for real success and 'social skills' and 'IQ' are separate things indeed. Speaking from experience here. Sigh. I can be a clueless idiot in public settings!

On the other hand, are we measuring success by money or by other factors? Because I may not have made a million before I was twenty but there are other factors to look at besides money. I'm quite happy to say that I use my intelligence and creativity on a regular basis, and enjoy the skills I have very much. *Shrug*

Wordworm
10-09-2006, 09:13 AM
Cynthia, do yourself a favour: forget about IQ scores.

"Intelligence" isn't defined by a score. If you're looking for a score, add up your experiences and factor that by your willingness to take risks with yourself and your abilities.

Listen to what your instincts tell you. Your "heart" and your "gut" are more important in the long run than your "brain."

And remember: there's no IQ test for right brain thinking, which is where you'll find imagination, humour, music, spatial abilities, and intuition, all of which are going to be more important for you in the long run.

NeuroFizz
10-09-2006, 04:25 PM
Matt Groening said, "Happiness in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know."

My personal experience has suggested that to be true. IMO, it's because life is inherently disappointing and sad. The smarter you are, the more acutely you understand that fact.
Matt Groening should hang around university faculty. So should you. Despite complaints about low salaries and stuff like that, you won't find a group of people more pleased with their career decisions and general lifestyle. And the majority have something to speak of in their skulls, too.

As for the studies mentioned--references, please.

As for the usefullness of IQ scores--I don't think intelligence can be summarized by a two or three-digit number. There are so many different kinds of intelligence that a numerical scale can't account for all of them.

Doctor Shifty
10-09-2006, 05:22 PM
Supposedly, I should be very successful. Sadly, I'm not.
I'm lacking in clues.
I need a new job and an agent.
Please send wisdom, stat.

Are they measuring life by numbers now? I must have missed something along the way. :)

Kim
PS. Here in Oz we don't use the word 'putz' and I don't really know what it means, so I have to guess it's something you don't like about yourself.

robeiae
10-09-2006, 05:29 PM
I have a D-class ceritifcate authorising me to administer standardised IQ tests and they first thing they taught me about them was that they are 95% bunk ;)But they only told you that because your IQ was high enough to understand it.

Cath
10-09-2006, 05:37 PM
There's IQ, which, as I understand it measures logical ability and EQ which measures (supposedly) emotional intelligence.

They're one dimensional tests, designed to look at one aspect of your personality. Neither give a rounded idea of the person as a whole.

I believe success is more likely when you find the right environment; one that enables you to grow, to develop your strengths and improve your weaknesses.

veinglory
10-09-2006, 08:15 PM
Having been coached in the answers and best strategies I could have a pretty high IQ now on the top three tests ;) I never was tested before the class so I have no idea what score I would have got. The few very innate tests happen to be things I can do (spatial rotation etc)

But it is important to remember that all IQ tests are based of Binet who designed them to identify children being failed by the education system and in need of remedial training--never intended to identify fixed abilities or potentials.

p.s. if you ever need to cheat on an IQ test or lie detector PM me for my top tips. Both were covered in the class. A few things can quickly add a lot of points. Like realising all the painted blocks are the same so you don't need to fossick through them to make the patterns.

Maryn
10-09-2006, 08:25 PM
veinglory, got anything that'll help Kid One with the GRE (Graduate Record Exams for grad school, like the SAT and ACT are for college) next week?

Maryn, pretty sure she'll do fine, but still...

TsukiRyoko
10-09-2006, 08:32 PM
Dye your hair purple. Works for me.

veinglory
10-09-2006, 08:55 PM
I'm not familiar with what tests they give as part of all that, being a "furriner" and all ;) So I can't help much there, sorry.

On across test effect is that you get a big boost by going in calm. i.e. easily listening on the ipod and avoid that last minute "panic chat" with all the other test-ees

Cath
10-09-2006, 09:21 PM
p.s. if you ever need to cheat on an IQ test or lie detector PM me for my top tips.
Now I'm wondering why you needed to take a class that helps you cheat a lie detector. All I'm coming up with so far is international spy. :D

MidnightMuse
10-09-2006, 09:23 PM
All I'm coming up with so far is international spy. :D

Politican?

Potential Serial Killer (pays better)

C.bronco
10-09-2006, 09:32 PM
yeah, well, I had to vent my frustration. I probably would've been in a better mood if Vickers hadn't taken out Jr. and Jimmie Johnson on the final lap at Talladega last night.
I'm done whining for the time being.

veinglory
10-09-2006, 09:33 PM
No, just to be a test operator. You need to try and spot people trying to cheat. Very dull.

icerose
10-10-2006, 12:07 AM
Sorry, I can't give an article, it was a collection of heads of universities for career day at our local community college come to dispell rumors about such things and that even the most gifted needed hard work to succeed. This included top specialists from many fields including art, mathematics, surgeons.

At the end of the day intelligence and gifts certainly help but they aren't the end all or an excuse for coasting. Some of the most gifted students were the first to flunk out because once it grew out of their coasting comfort zone and they had to do some work and study to do well, they gave up and went home so to speak.

veinglory
10-10-2006, 12:13 AM
-----

Kate Thornton
10-10-2006, 12:22 AM
I discovered that there is nothing as satisfying as doing what you love and getting paid for it. BUT (there's that big but again - follows me everywhere) when you are intelligent, there are so many things you love doing - and you can be good at - that it's hard to choose.

Also, once you choose ( 3 or 4 or 5) you have be focused on making things happen, and the impatience of the intelligent will alway work against you there.

But as an intelligent person, you have the ability to learn nearly anything - that's the real good in being intelligent, by the way. So learn the skills you need to make *your* life happy, and don't neglect the social skills because they are crucial. Oh, and being intelligent doesn't make anything (except learning) easier.

robeiae
10-10-2006, 01:12 AM
Huh?

Kate Thornton
10-10-2006, 01:20 AM
Being intelligent doesn't make anything (except learning) easier.
Figure out what you would enjoy doing for a living and learn to do it.

Simpler?

SpookyWriter
10-10-2006, 01:28 AM
Being intelligent doesn't make anything (except learning) easier.
Figure out what you would enjoy doing for a living and learn to do it.

Simpler?I'd like to have sex ten times a day with beautiful women under forty. How can I apply my love for sex into a rewarding career that pays? Hmmmm...

robeiae
10-10-2006, 01:32 AM
I'd like to have sex ten times a day with beautiful women under forty. How can I apply my love for sex into a rewarding career that pays? Hmmmm...Keep using your imagintion...it's working for you, so far!

veinglory
10-10-2006, 01:35 AM
Um, writing erotica, perhaps? ;)

SpookyWriter
10-10-2006, 01:35 AM
Keep using your imagintion...it's working for you, so far!I'm trying to apply my high IQ as best possible and enjoy my work. :D

poetinahat
10-10-2006, 03:04 AM
veinglory, got anything that'll help Kid One with the GRE (Graduate Record Exams for grad school, like the SAT and ACT are for college) next week?

Maryn, pretty sure she'll do fine, but still...
I got exactly the same average score on the GRE as I did on the SAT. I don't remember finding it any more difficult. There's an additional section for logical thinking; for that, I'd suggest practicing on a book of logic puzzles (Dell and Penny Press produce good ones).

Then again, I took the SAT in '81 and the GRE in '86 or so. Things might have changed. On the other hand, I got into the colleges of my choice.

Good luck, Maryn; I'm guessing you're more nervous than Kid One.

PeeDee
10-10-2006, 04:26 AM
I'd like to have sex ten times a day with beautiful women under forty. How can I apply my love for sex into a rewarding career that pays? Hmmmm...

Well...and I'm just throwing this out there....you could get back to your street corner before I have to beat you.

eldragon
10-10-2006, 04:32 AM
IQ doesn't have alot to do with perseverance and drive.


Type A personalities are usually successful and aren't always booksmart.

Fortunately for me - I don't have to worry about such things - my IQ is average and I'm more inclined to take a nap then do anything else.

TrainofThought
10-10-2006, 05:02 AM
Doing what it is that you love to do, and getting paid for it. When you find the answer please send it to me.

C.bronco
10-10-2006, 05:08 AM
Unfortunately I know... it takes a good agent (who will sign me)

SpookyWriter
10-10-2006, 05:23 AM
Well...and I'm just throwing this out there....you could get back to your street corner before I have to beat you.Hey now, I ain't into that rough stuff. If you know what I mean. ;)

BottomlessCup
10-10-2006, 07:13 AM
Matt Groening should hang around university faculty. So should you.

Actually, one of my best friends is a prof. And he's the whiniest mofo I know.

Of course, he's an art professor, so I'm not sure that counts. I always figured his crabbiness was due to waking up one day and saying, "Holy ****. I have a PHD in bronze sculpture. What have I done?"

NeuroFizz
10-10-2006, 04:17 PM
Some of the most gifted students were the first to flunk out because once it grew out of their coasting comfort zone and they had to do some work and study to do well, they gave up and went home so to speak.
Thanks for clarifying, Ice. This statement is much more realistic, but in my experience with college students still applicable for a small minority of undergraduates, and nearly non-applicable for graduate students. The statement is a far cry from the original one put forward:


Studies actually show that those with higher IQ's are less likely to succeed.

I can accept for first one here, but not the second statement, at least not without some very specific evidence. It is counterintuitive, stated in such a blanket way.

NeuroFizz
10-10-2006, 04:20 PM
Actually, one of my best friends is a prof. And he's the whiniest mofo I know.
n = 1

Rolling Thunder
10-10-2006, 07:01 PM
My business partner's family is a good example for this thread. He was a Math Honor student, his aunt graduated valedictorian from high school, his brother is an electronics whiz who could have gone into nuclear engineering. His daughters have Masters Degrees in psychology, business and accounting as well.

Yet, the drive isn't there. Not one of them went on to jobs of high prestige, settling for humble 'bread and butter' jobs. But, they are a happy, close knit lot. So even though they didn't go on to levels of higher potential they did what was best for themselves.

Knowing this, I can only imagine that intelligence can't be measured by a test given by someone else. Tests are far too subjective, measuring only what is deemed important by the parameters of the questions asked. I think it's more important when each individual knows what they want out of life. This ultimately defines intelligence.

Once thing I do know for sure, they all read like there's no tomorrow. Various subjects too; from poetry to horror to classic literature and so on. I doubt they're unique in these aspects as well.

poetinahat
10-10-2006, 07:04 PM
n = 1
Not quite enough to apply "Student's t", eh?





I find statistical humour extremely aμsing.

NeuroFizz
10-10-2006, 07:09 PM
Using humor in statistics is just a standard error of regression.

NeuroFizz
10-10-2006, 07:16 PM
Not one of them went on to jobs of high prestige, settling for humble 'bread and butter' jobs.
Is this how you measure "success" in life? Auto mechanics can have superior intelligence, apply it to their jobs, and be a huge successes in life (and happy to boot). With your measure of success, maybe an equally valuable indicator is the kind of car one drives...

Rolling Thunder
10-10-2006, 07:28 PM
Is this how you measure "success" in life? Auto mechanics can have superior intelligence, apply it to their jobs, and be a huge successes in life (and happy to boot). With your measure of success, maybe an equally valuable indicator is the kind of car one drives...

Actually, it does work for me, at least. I am succesful, money wise, but I choose to live with simple pleasures. I know I'm not alone in this either, after reading 'The millionare next door' and understanding that success has many different levels.

I've built expensive homes for people who can't afford to furnish them and struggle with piles of debt, yet don't think twice about buying a new $80K Mercedes.

I think it just comes down to what the individual views as success in their own way.

BottomlessCup
10-11-2006, 12:32 AM
I'd also like to point out that - just like IQ doesn't equal success - success doesn't equal IQ.

My company almost exclusively moves corporate accounts, so 90% of the people we move are big shots. I can't tell you how often I'm amazed at the people who are in high-end positions. Many of them don't appear smart at all. (For example, the Director of Marketing who asked me if I could yank the gas line out of the wall so that the stove would fit.)

From my extensive personal experiences with corporate types, I would say that - at least in that world - pure intelligence has little to do with advancement.

(Some of them are verrrrry intelligent, though. I moved the new CEO of a Fortune 500 bank and you could see waves of "smart" wafting off her.)