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sassandgroove
10-07-2006, 01:18 AM
Is it?:

He is a member of the King's Counsel.

or

He is a member of the King's Council.

I keep messing it up.

MidnightMuse
10-07-2006, 01:33 AM
Well my dictionary has:

Council: A group of people called together for discussion or consultation. An official legislative or administrative body.

and

Counsel: Deliberation or consultation. Advice, guidance. A plan or action.

I've always thought of it this way: The Council meets to offer you counsel. Then again, I'm occasionally an idoit in need of such councils and counsel, so I could be out there on this one :D

sassandgroove
10-07-2006, 01:52 AM
Thanks! :):) I need to come up with a way to remember, like with principle and principal. At school, the principal is your pal. Corny, but it works. Maybe

I need to call the council meeting. ?

TheIT
10-07-2006, 01:58 AM
Counsel can also refer to a lawyer, like counselor. My Websters dictionary points out that council and counsel are related but are not interchangeable.

Spirit_Fire
10-07-2006, 02:53 AM
I've always thought of counsel as in 'School counsellor', and council as in 'Shire council' or 'County council' (local government).

So it should probably be The King's Council.

But the king would gather his nobles/ministers/magicians for their counsel.

TheIT
10-07-2006, 02:59 AM
To make it more confusing, counsels can serve on a council. ;)

Council = group of individuals

Counsel = individual person

Cathy C
10-07-2006, 03:13 AM
Here's my little trick:

A person coun-sells--sells the person on their idea.

A group is coun-cil-atory--they usually try to make everyone happy, to appease.

sassandgroove
10-09-2006, 06:48 PM
THanks all, that is very helpful. :)

Sandi LeFaucheur
10-09-2006, 06:53 PM
Collins Dictionary says one definition for counsel is "a group of barristers engaged in conducting cases in court or advising on legal matters". Since a QC (or if there is a King, a KC) is a barrister appointed Counsel to the Crown (or in Canada, an honorary title bestowed by the government on a long-serving lawyer), it is Queen's (or King's) Counsel.


I've always thought of counsel as in 'School counsellor', and council as in 'Shire council' or 'County council' (local government).

So it should probably be The King's Council.


It's not government being referred to in this case, but the legal system.

sassandgroove
10-09-2006, 07:02 PM
:D Which brings me back to my question. for my novel, do I use "the King's Counsel" or "the King's Council"?

Or throw my hands up and name it something else?

Sandi LeFaucheur
10-09-2006, 07:29 PM
Are they lawyers? If so, the King's Counsel. What is the context?

sassandgroove
10-09-2006, 07:43 PM
It is a fantasy novel. (The role of King is hereditary or taken by force.) They are elected officals. Originally I was going to have them appointed, but it worked out better for the plot if I added the stress of remaining in the good graces of the public so they can be re-elected.

TsukiRyoko
10-09-2006, 08:49 PM
Council. Counsel is a verb(generally), council is a noun.

Sandi LeFaucheur
10-09-2006, 09:02 PM
Council. Counsel is a verb(generally), council is a noun.


Actually, counsel is a noun as often as it's a verb, just in a different sense! If they are elected officials, I would spell it council, as in councillors (or with one l, if you're American). King's Counsel, as I said, refers to barristers.

sassandgroove
10-09-2006, 09:40 PM
Thanks Sandi. I will use council with confidence now. :D