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Ordinary_Guy
09-25-2006, 10:20 PM
Mythbusters has done it again...

A previous episode had a great bit busting the methods used to infiltrate through ducts (magnetic and suction against the metal walls).

They've done it again this time with the biometric locks.

While I didn't see the episode, somebody over at Engadget did and they did a great write-up (http://www.engadget.com/2006/09/22/digital-fingerprint-door-lock-defeated-by-photocopied-print/):

Digital fingerprint door lock defeated by photocopied 'print
Posted Sep 22nd 2006 7:48AM by Cyrus Farivar

There's an old adage in the security community that any lock can be picked. Well in this modern age of digital doorlocks with fingerprint scanners (http://www.engadget.com/2006/06/25/nec-announces-super-sensitive-fingerprint-scanner/), you can't exactly pick them with a bump key (http://www.engadget.com/2006/08/24/the-lockdown-locked-but-not-secure-part-i/), nail file or other such assorted tools, now can you? Luckliy for budding criminals, the smart cats on "Mythbusters" discovered that one of these "never been broken" digital fingerprint scanner locks (they didn't cite the manufacturer) -- which also comes with thermal sensors (to detect if there's a real human behind that print) -- can in fact be quite easily duped. So how'd they do it? By copying the master fingerprint onto a piece of latex and attaching it to his thumb, Adam Savage was able to open the lock without a problem. Savage and his team then duplicated the feat by making another copy with ballistics gel. And to top it all off, they did it a third time (check the video link below) with a just a photocopy of the master fingerprint and a little saliva. Perhaps our own Marc Weber Tobias (http://www.engadget.com/bloggers/marc-weber-tobias) should have a word with the makers of these schlocky locks.
So... there you have it.

Outside "Mission:Impossible", what other spy/thriller flicks can you think of that use biometric locks (and, better, ways of defeating them)?

Sheryl Nantus
09-25-2006, 10:48 PM
that, btw, was a GREAT episode!!!

:D

I WUV the Mythbusters!

Soccer Mom
09-25-2006, 11:33 PM
It was an awesome episode. Mythbusters totally Rawks! Whoot!

soloset
09-26-2006, 02:53 AM
Ahem. I seem to recall MacGyver did this first with a candle and a fingerprint from a glass.

(Is it really sad that I remembered that?)

I can't think of any movies, but I used to work for a company that had a fingerprint scanner on the time clock. Stupid idea, and incredibly easy to circumvent through social engineering.

rtilryarms
09-26-2006, 04:07 AM
I can defeat the buildings with biometric and iris scan. How I would do it depends on which type of building it is, and a slew of other information I can gather in one short tour.

It is my job to expose points of failure and it would not be responsible of me to explain how here, nor would I write about it in a book I am writing. I suspect that MI had a budget capable of hiring a Due Diligence Consultant equal to or better than me.

It could be that MI and others hire consultants to devise break-ins to adapt to a story, which would be believable to the average viewer.

In the old days, they used pictures that hung in front of cameras to fool the Security Guards into thinking that everything was fine as the pictures represented exactly the view it replaced. People bought this concept and it was duplicated on many a TV show and Movie. But it is an absurd technique, which makes me cringe with unbelievability every time I see it.

And how many times do we see cat burglars creeping through Air Conditioning ductwork? Where are the turning vanes and dampers on the supply air? Where is the internal lining on the return air? And duct that big only extends a very short distance before it reduces down! Long distance utilizes high pressure air on smaller oval ducts which gets it's volume reduced and balanced at variable air volume terminals.

OK, so the return air can be big enough at the very end but, ok, where the heck is the damm dust and dirt? IT"S ALWAYS SHINEY! DANG IT! I could go on.

Oops, sorry. Where was I? Yes, I can enter a building with advanced access control technology. But I prefer to exploit the single source of failure that every Building Manager tells me does not exist. And after that one is fixed, I take particular pleasure at pointing out the next.

You will never see it in the movies though. It is protected knowledge.

WTC 12 was a known point of failure but the terrorists lucked out with that one, they did not have previous knowledge of it.

Jamesaritchie
09-26-2006, 08:30 AM
The easiest way into any building is to be invited in, and this is usually much easier than most would believe.

My-Immortal
09-26-2006, 08:57 AM
Outside "Mission:Impossible", what other spy/thriller flicks can you think of that use biometric locks (and, better, ways of defeating them)?

In the last Bond movie, Die Another Day, Bond uses the recently severed arm from one of the henchmen to get through the biometric lock.

In Entrapment, Sean Connery and Catherine Zeta-Jones use a duplicated retinal scan and copied finger prints (can't remember how they duplicated the finger prints - it's been a while since I watched the movie).

Arnold Schwarzenegger's movie....6th Day...(title?)-where his character gets cloned-uses the recently severed fingers from one of the female antagonists to bypass the biometric lock on the car's starter.

...just to name a few...

:)

rtilryarms
09-26-2006, 02:20 PM
The easiest way into any building is to be invited in, and this is usually much easier than most would believe.

*smacks head* Why didn't i think of that?

rtilryarms
09-26-2006, 02:22 PM
In the last Bond movie, Die Another Day, Bond uses the recently severed arm from one of the henchmen to get through the biometric lock.

In Entrapment, Sean Connery and Catherine Zeta-Jones use a duplicated retinal scan and copied finger prints (can't remember how they duplicated the finger prints - it's been a while since I watched the movie).

Arnold Schwarzenegger's movie....6th Day...(title?)-where his character gets cloned-uses the recently severed fingers from one of the female antagonists to bypass the biometric lock on the car's starter.

...just to name a few...

:)

None would pass the thermal or pulse part of the scan. Retinas are also coupled with light intrusion for pupil dilation.

Mac H.
09-26-2006, 04:34 PM
None would pass the thermal or pulse part of the scan. Retinas are also coupled with light intrusion for pupil dilation.No, but this techique does ...


The German team fooled a facial recognition scanner by showing the camera a short video. The same team cracked another by displaying a photograph of the iris of an eye, printed on a high-resolution color laser printer and with a hole cut in the center of the image, to trick an iris scanner into a false identification

Ref: http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,103535-page,1/article.html
The simplistic algorithm simply agreed that the 'outer' part of the photo matched the iris on record, and confirmed that the 'inner' part of the eye responded with a pupil dilation !

I'd have thought a simple video of the person's eye responding to light would work - trigger the video from the light flash to have it 'respond'. But I guess the simpler method suffices ....

If you want to get more complex - it is fundamentally impossible to detect a 'piggy in the middle' attack - no matter what method is used to verify the person. (Even if the victim is asked for a 60 digit code that the attacker doesn't know ...)

Mac

Sheryl Nantus
09-26-2006, 05:03 PM
it has been my experience, having worked in security for over a decade, that while clients want high security they are the weakest link - give me the best security but don't make me change my routine or have to do anything complicated.

:D

Kate Thornton
09-26-2006, 06:09 PM
Sheryl, ain't it the truth! Back when I taught Counterintelligence, our B&E was simple - get invited in! And if you want to get invited in, watch for routines, exploit them, and do your social engineering. Even socially awkward agents could use this technique, but socially-adept actors were the very best.

rtilryarms
09-26-2006, 06:32 PM
it has been my experience, having worked in security for over a decade, that while clients want high security they are the weakest link - give me the best security but don't make me change my routine or have to do anything complicated.

:D

Exactly.

Ordinary_Guy
09-26-2006, 11:06 PM
Sheryl, ain't it the truth! Back when I taught Counterintelligence, our B&E was simple - get invited in! And if you want to get invited in, watch for routines, exploit them, and do your social engineering. Even socially awkward agents could use this technique, but socially-adept actors were the very best.
You're taking the fun out of B&E...

Caveat: even if you get in the perimeter using deception, getting access to the areas you need may be a whole new challenge. Further, the non-critical facilities may have easier entry and less internal surveillance, but the really sensitive facilities? Even with the dork HR manager that keeps all his passwords written on a sheet in his wallet (for example), you still have to get to a physical location where you can use them.

There's three ways to get around access problems: have someone do it for you (but that requires a case officer recruiting an agent [the arch nemesis of you CI folk]), do it yourself the slow way (work your way in via the hiring process), do it the fast way (a little B&E).