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jerewrites
09-18-2006, 09:00 PM
Two questions:

(1) Which is grammatically correct?

(a) They spoke to one another for an over an hour.

(b) They spoke to each other for over an hour.

And why?

(2) Which is grammatically correct?

(a) They drove towards town in silence.

(b) They drove toward town in silence.

Advice from seasoned writers would be greatly appreciated.

Tracy
09-18-2006, 09:08 PM
In both your examples, both are correct, it's just a matter of choice. I would marginally prefer 'towards' to 'toward', but I think that might be a cultural thing - I'm pretty sure that in North America it's fairly common.

Becky Writes
09-18-2006, 09:14 PM
#1, both are correct.
#2, I prefer 'toward'. It just sounds better to me when spoken, but I could be wrong (and probably am :D )

brendao
09-18-2006, 09:19 PM
IMHO, "They talked for more than an hour" suffices. Talking implies that it occurred between the two of them. By the way, "over" is not technically the correct preposition to use, although you'll often hear it spoken that way. Instead, use "more than" to imply length of time.

In your second example, I prefer toward, or simply to.

Akiahara
09-18-2006, 09:47 PM
Two questions:

(1) Which is grammatically correct?

(a) They spoke to one another for an over an hour.

(b) They spoke to each other for over an hour.

And why?

(2) Which is grammatically correct?

(a) They drove towards town in silence.

(b) They drove toward town in silence.

Advice from seasoned writers would be greatly appreciated.

isn't there an extra "an" in there?

Marlowe
09-18-2006, 10:04 PM
isn't there an extra "an" in there?

I was just wondering that myself. I don't think "an over an hour" is actually correct.

jbal
09-18-2006, 10:06 PM
Two questions:

(1) Which is grammatically correct?

(a) They spoke to one another for an over an hour.

(b) They spoke to each other for over an hour.

And why?

(2) Which is grammatically correct?

(a) They drove towards town in silence.

(b) They drove toward town in silence.

Advice from seasoned writers would be greatly appreciated.
Actually, "They spoke for over an hour" should be sufficient. "to one another" is unnecessary regardless of the verb. Talked, conversed, etc.

rugcat
09-18-2006, 10:09 PM
"Toward" and "towards" are both used. I think "toward" is more common, but I've noticed that people from the Central NE US, i.e. Minnesota or Wisconsin tend to use "towards."

It might also be a Canadian thing; any Canadians out there to correct me?

Akiahara
09-18-2006, 10:18 PM
I was just wondering that myself. I don't think "an over an hour" is actually correct.
i'm glad someone else caught that. i was reading that going... what?

it was written "They spoke to one another for an over an hour." that shouldn't there... it should read, "They spoke to one another for over an hour." though i think saying "They spoke for over an hour" is sufficient. :)

janetbellinger
09-18-2006, 10:20 PM
I think you could use either although if it were my own work I would delete the sentence entirely and show the conversation the two people had. That would show it was a lengthy conversation.

CaroGirl
09-18-2006, 10:56 PM
"Toward" and "towards" are both used. I think "toward" is more common, but I've noticed that people from the Central NE US, i.e. Minnesota or Wisconsin tend to use "towards."

It might also be a Canadian thing; any Canadians out there to correct me?
I'm a Canadian! <waves hand frantically>

When I was in journalism school, our style book (CP style, as opposed to AP style) cited "toward" as correct.

In my travels I've discovered that "toward" is more common in the US and "towards" more common in the UK. Which you prefer depends on where you come from and what you're used to seeing.

Bk_30
09-19-2006, 12:12 AM
hmm toward or towards..I have used both.
"Head toward the old school, turn left at the big oak tree."
"We went towards the door, but were stopped by the doorman."

jerewrites
09-19-2006, 12:40 AM
Thanks, everybody, for taking the time to answer my questions. BTW, yes, I mistakenly used "an" twice in the first example. It was unintentional. (Can't sneak a single thing past you guys, can I?)

Akiahara
09-19-2006, 12:52 AM
Thanks, everybody, for taking the time to answer my questions. BTW, yes, I mistakenly used "an" twice in the first example. It was unintentional. (Can't sneak a single thing past you guys, can I?)
don't you lie! it was a pop quiz!

i didn't know we were being tested. :tongue

Wordworm
09-19-2006, 12:59 AM
Canadian second opinion: "towards" ain't 'specially Canadian.
Personally, I vote for "toward"...

pianoman5
09-19-2006, 11:14 AM
I've always understood that 'towards' is more common in Australia/NZ/UK and that 'toward' is favo(u)red in US/Canada.

There is a bit of history in the 'each other' and 'one another' debate, because at one time it was suggested that 'each other' should be used in the case of two people and 'one another' when referring to three or more people. These days, however, it seems there is no argument about them being used interchangeably.

The confusion may have been caused by the distinction between 'each' and 'every', where 'each' refers to two or more things (with a kind of serial implication) and 'every' is used where there are more than two things considered individually.

Brenda Hill
09-20-2006, 09:41 AM
'Each other' is used for two people, and 'one another' for more than two.

'Toward' is correct.