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Neeli
09-10-2006, 04:16 AM
Was it a book? Something someone said? Have you known all your life you would do this? Is it your destiny?

For me it was--surprise--LOTR, and the words attributed to JRR Tolkien (paraphrased): there aren't enough good stories of the kind I like to read.

What about you?

KiwiChick
09-10-2006, 04:38 AM
If I can't go and live in an exciting fantasy world, the next best thing is to write about one. I think writing was really an extension of daydreaming for me.

Oddsocks
09-10-2006, 05:04 AM
For me, it was the characters and worlds that have always been in my head, combined with more recent story ideas. Like KiwiChick said - an extension of daydreaming.

bylinebree
09-10-2006, 06:23 AM
A friend who was critiquing my poetry (really bad poetry) looked at me one day-- I think I was babbling something about some story that affected me-- and said:

"Why don't YOU write a novel?"

I laughed at her question, though she was serious in a twinkling-sort of way. Then two weeks later, I woke up with a very vivid MC in my head and began asking who the heck he was, and what was his story?
And took it from there.

Veniar
09-10-2006, 06:28 AM
For me, it's because I'm not a very expressive person, so there's no way for me to get all these deep-seeded feelings out of me. Therefore, I use my writing to convey these feelings in a subliminal sort of way. Another reason is because I like to day dream a lot, and I don't want my imagination to lay waste.

Jamesaritchie
09-10-2006, 09:58 AM
Money. I read an article wherein Robert Heinlein said he write his first short story in order to pay an overdue bill. I had my own overdue bills. It seemed to me that if he could do it, I could at least try it. So I tried it.

I sat down and wrote a story in a couple of days, sent it to a magazine, and they sent me a check for almost as much money as my day job paid in a month. I wrote a couple more quick stories, and they also sold. Then I wrote a novel and it sold. Been at it ever since.

sunandshadow
09-10-2006, 12:21 PM
I attended a Montessori elementary school and it's a standard part of their curriculum to ask students to write fiction. Among other things I recall writing a myth about the constellation Draco and a short illustrated book about a show-jumping horse. I always made up and acted out stories with my plastic horses. It didn't occurr to me that I could write real novels until I was in 8th grade though. At that point I started writing a science fiction coming-of-age/romance novel influenced about equally by Ender's Game and Mercedes Lackey's Valdemar books, maybe with hints of Star Trek and Anne McCaffrey's Pern books in there too.

Inky
09-10-2006, 12:34 PM
The art of Todd Lockwood. I fell in love with the cover of Plot & Poison, and stories began spinning yarns in my head faster then I could key them into the computer. On a whim, I emailed him & asked if I could include him in my dedication page. That was a year ago. We've become great friends, he's critiqued some of my work, and inspired more.
His book, Transitions, is a great collection of his work..his website has characters that make you cringe, and others that make you drool.
Another master is Keith Parkinson (tragically, he passed away --October?--from cancer). If you get a chance, look at the detail these two artists put into things like chain mail, hair, background, and how their characters are so life-like as if they posed for the creation--not cartoonish and garish like some artists.
Anyhooo...that's mi' inspiration for the fantasy romance I write.

As far as writing-writing...I was 14 and thought I could rewrite Gone With The Wind--then I woke up. My first historical romance, Moonstruck Madness and another called Raven made me wanna be a pirate when I grew up...ahhhh, they just don't make historicals like that anymore. Plus...I love romance with the paranormal/fantasy twist done in this era versus the bodice ripping of days gone by....of course...NOW it's called Erotica.

dragonjax
09-10-2006, 03:56 PM
Was it a book? Something someone said? Have you known all your life you would do this? Is it your destiny?

For me it was--surprise--LOTR, and the words attributed to JRR Tolkien (paraphrased): there aren't enough good stories of the kind I like to read.

Damn straight. LOTR, definitely. That book made me want to find a doorway to magic. Always has. I used to read it once a year; every September.

Next on the list: the original Dragonlance chronicles, tons of comic book titles, and then, when I was older, pretty much everything Neil Gaiman wrote.

Diana Hignutt
09-10-2006, 04:16 PM
Michael Crichton's The Andromeda Strain.

Shweta
09-10-2006, 04:40 PM
Huh.
LotR never seemed to me like something I could do. It was just too... much itself.
I think David Eddings is the person who got me thinking "I could do that."

Course, now I no longer want to do that. I want to be like Gaiman, like Windling, like Kushner, like McKillip, like Wrede... and I think it'd be a lot easier to be like Tolkien :/

At least I am now - perhaps - daunted at a higher level.

Qelenhn
09-11-2006, 12:03 AM
I don't actually remember. Probably because I was under ten years old at the time. I don't have those novels anymore, but I was writing a few back then. Well, I thought they were novels. I think they were more like Punky Brewster fanfic, in which she got sucked into a fantasy world... I have distinct memories of there being a poster board sized map of this fantasy world that I threw away in one of my teen "embarassed by the childhood me" phases. I wish I'd skipped those phases. I'm terribly curious about that map.

I think I started writing because what else did you do with a fantasy world? I started creating fantasy worlds because Neverending Story taught me that if I didn't make them up they'd cease to exist. And at the time that made sense. I also started writing because I read constantly, and it's in my nature to try to make my own of something I really enjoy. I do it now because I can't seem to help making up worlds and characters, and then I get attached to them and come to believe their stories are worth telling.

allion
09-11-2006, 02:43 AM
For me, it was first watching Star Wars then reading Tolkien. I wanted to read about strong female characters, and I found them missing from a lot of the stuff I read back then.

Basically, I wanted to write a book I wanted to read.

Karen

Lyra Jean
09-11-2006, 03:25 AM
I'm from the TV generation. I grew up watching science fiction with my dad. Every Saturday it was "Planet of the Apes" "Dr. Paul Bearer" and "Elvira, Mistress of the Dark"

He even named me after a princess from outer space. He read it in a science fiction book when he was a teenager. So maybe it's destiny.

Gary
09-11-2006, 04:45 AM
I don't have the slightest idea. I'm not especially interested in trying to sell a story, but I have this itch that only seems to get scratched when I write something I've been carrying around in my mind for a long time.

Etola
09-11-2006, 06:30 AM
This is a tough question. I know I had a habit of playing out stories in my head (overactive childhood imagination, and all that). I'd create whole worlds and populate them, and granted, most of them early on were populated by talking animals and characters from my favorite cartoon shows.

Then, in 6th grade, I was bored from having nothing to do in Study Hall all the time, so I pulled out a piece of looseleaf and began writing a story. Around 7th grade, I discovered Anne McCaffrey and was instantly hooked on her Pern novels, and decided that I wanted to be a writer, and create whole worlds and set novels in them. There were soon so many stories in my head that it didn't make sense not to write them down.

I knew it was the right decision, because up until then, every 'career choice' I made, I lost interest in within a year. but 15 years later, I still want to be a writer :)

andyand
09-11-2006, 06:40 AM
My wife, she encouraged me to write a short story for our first child. Since then I've written many for our 5 children.

Inky
09-11-2006, 07:38 AM
Tried reading The Hobbit when I was 11. Toooooo much detail for me to wrap my head around. The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe pulled me in--no pun intended. The Chronicles of Narnia had me believing animals could talk (The Horse and His Boy), secret worlds existed within our reach....and my Parchisi (sp?) board made a GREAT universe map, taped marbles other worlds to explore. Static-ridden walky-talkies were transformers...kept Scotty quite busy beaming me away from the step-mother.
I was a Klingon (hey, chicks can be Klingons too!)...uh..I liked the bad boys. It's a teenage female thing. Okay, so my bad boys were from other galaxies, Klingons, Hans Solo--and Vampires--I stretched m' horizons.
Star Wars (1st generation) was a world of wonderment.

And now...as an adult...well....hail Peter Jackson. Ohmigod!!! NOW I get The Hobbit/LOTR....wow!:Hail:

But alas, at 41, I'd look a bit ridiculous pinning game boards up on the wall, or concentrating on the cat to make him speak. So I write about other realms. Much safer. No men with white jackets coming towards me.

Shweta
09-11-2006, 09:13 AM
Tolkien's writing makes many people bounce. I happen to like it a lot, but I don't see that not getting the hobbit or not liking LotR is anything wrong, that you have to confess :)

I strongly believe that whether a story is a "classic" or a "just plain story", it's up to the author to pull their audience in, and if that doesn't happen it's seldom, if ever, the reader's fault.

Inky
09-11-2006, 09:57 AM
Tolkien's writing makes many people bounce. I happen to like it a lot, but I don't see that not getting the hobbit or not liking LotR is anything wrong, that you have to confess :)

I strongly believe that whether a story is a "classic" or a "just plain story", it's up to the author to pull their audience in, and if that doesn't happen it's seldom, if ever, the reader's fault.

No, no, no--waving hands--my wording must be off. I meant that I was super intriqued, but the lengthy description of scenes was too much for my 11 yr old mind. Sooo, the movie condensed all of it, and was done very well--and suddenly the barrier was removed. Had always been curious about the whole Hobbit thing (animations in my day did it a diservice)...so I'm jumping on ship a bit late. Late bloomer--love/awed by what Tolkein was able to create. Utterly amazed.

Camilla
09-11-2006, 10:25 AM
At one point, I felt my life was going down the toilet, so I started writing as an escape from that, and as an outlet for stuff. I started writing short stories, then poetry (really, really awful poetry), and then I realised I actually enjoyed the story writing for its own sake, and kept going.

It's a bit like breathing these days. Can't imagine my life without it.

Shweta
09-11-2006, 10:46 AM
No, no, no--waving hands--my wording must be off. I meant that I was super intriqued, but the lengthy description of scenes was too much for my 11 yr old mind. Sooo, the movie condensed all of it, and was done very well--and suddenly the barrier was removed. Had always been curious about the whole Hobbit thing (animations in my day did it a diservice)...so I'm jumping on ship a bit late. Late bloomer--love/awed by what Tolkein was able to create. Utterly amazed.

Ah, I see.
Some of the scene descriptions are too much for my adult mind. I have yet to manage to read LotR without skimming over several hundred pages of gorgeous scene description just because... eyes... glazing...
I try again every few years. Reading aloud is the only way I can manage it. (One reason I'm sad I don't have kids is that those are in fact awesome read-aloud books.)

The movies are wonderful, I think; also fairly different from the books -- in a number of details, but also in some crucial issues of characterization. In my mind the books are a different sort of wonderful.

But this is thread hijacking and I should stop. Sorry! :flag:

MadScientistMatt
09-11-2006, 06:35 PM
It wasn't a great work of literature or anything. What "inspired" me to write was when I saw The Fast and the Furious. I walked out of the theater thinking, "I could write a better script than that!"

Well, I took too much time at it, and the script was meant to skewer a few cliches in the automotive world that are much less realistic nowadays. But I started writing more stuff after that.

Matt
09-11-2006, 07:46 PM
Iíd say it was my folks who inspired me to write.

Thankfully, I was weaned on great kids books (The Bogwoppit, The Hobbit, Robinson Crusoe etc) but surrounded by large bookshelves full of adult literature from classics like Dickens to sci-fi like Frank Herbert, fantasy by the likes of Michael Moorcock, and horror by Stephen King. I was in a great reading environment, and when I started writing stories at school at 8 years old they werenít the usual kidís stories (in fact my teachers were worried that I was writing quite graphic World War 2 adventures where untold Nazis where mowed down often in delightfully gory ways!).

I graduated from writing war stories to horror stories when I was around 11 years old, influenced by films such as The Omen, Poltergeist and Gremlins. On the literature side of things, the short stories of Stephen King were a big help, as were Poe and Lovecraft. Throughout this time, my folks were there again, encouraging me, reading my work, helping my writing where they could, and I learnt more from them than five years of schooling.
It was only later that I learnt both parents wrote stories when they were younger but gave up because either there wasnít enough encouragement at school, or family life then intervened.
So I guess writing is in the genes, itís just that Iím the only one in the family who has pursued it.:)

I wrote my first book when I was 18. It wasnít inspired by any one thing, but a mixture of stuff: the place where I grew up, an ex-girlfriend, Clive Barkerís writings, and the thick black goo of my imagination that spews the words onto the page.

The Secret War, which is published in the UK next January, was not really inspired by any one thing either, but evolved as ideas do, taking on different characters, subplots, even settings. It actually started out as S.King-ish modern horror story when I began writing it in 1993. Since then itís turned into an action-fantasy adventure set in 1815, very much eschewing the over-the-top gore for the epic historical spectacle (though itís still a pretty graphic book by all accounts!).

Evaine
09-11-2006, 11:49 PM
When I was five, I decided that I wanted to be a librarian.
I hadn't then worked out that books were written by real people.

When I was eleven (and helping out in my local library every spare moment I had) I was given Little Women for Christmas.
Suddenly I wanted to be Jo March, and I started to write, in coloured felt tip, changing colour when the pen ran down or I ran out of inspiration (at least the stories were multi-coloured!)

Later, I discovered Star Trek fandom - and people actually wanted to read what I wrote! (Some ST fan stories are very good indeed. Some ST fan stories are unbelievably bad. Mine were, I think, moderately bad, though there are one or two I have fond memories of).

So those were the influences....

James D. Macdonald
09-12-2006, 12:51 AM
Ran out of things in English to read.

MidnightMuse
09-12-2006, 01:02 AM
Not enough of the stories I like to read, combined with buying books that turned out to be so dreadful, I knew I could do better. Well, the jury might still be out, but I haven't stopped working on it :D

SeanDSchaffer
09-12-2006, 01:35 AM
What inspired me to begin to write?

My Dad, when I was nine years old, looked at some of my writing and said that someday, if I worked at it, I could become an author.

He himself was a writer, although I do not know his publishing credits, if any. He was also an avid reader, big on Ian Fleming....to the point that he and my mother named me Sean after Sean Connery, the actor who at the time, played James Bond, Fleming's most famous character.

MattW
09-12-2006, 02:32 AM
One good teacher in HS.

Plus the fact that college girls liked writers better than they liked engineers. And that creative writing had cute girls in the class, and engineering didn't even have ugly ones.

yanallefish
09-14-2006, 12:13 AM
I just sort of do it... no, seriously, it's there. Always has been. Though, yeah, one of my first influences was Tolkien (which means a lot of the first stuff I wrote was bad rip-off wannabe stuff - somewhere between him and McCaffrey). It's gotten more complex over the years, and I think better (well at least it's my own writing now and not me trying to be someone else). Honest? If you asked me what else I'd like to do with my life, I wouldn't have a clue.

*g*Hey, jax, I still read LOTR religiously once a year - generally starting September!

Shadow_Ferret
09-14-2006, 12:37 AM
I've always been a dreamer.

Ordinary_Guy
09-14-2006, 01:50 AM
What inspired you to begin to write?
Family. I came from a family of story-tellers. On my mom's side, my grandfather would tell tales of vikings and knights and great battles. My mom absorbed his style and passed it on to me. From my father's side, I had a grandfather that was a photojournalist. He told stories too, though in a whole different way. That was passed on too...

Now I write stories, long and short, prose and script.

Xathax
09-14-2006, 04:50 AM
Was selling books door-to-door in Buffalo, NY during the summer between my Freshman and Sophmore years at college. I was working 80-82 hour weeks (6 13-14 hour days with meetings all day on the 7th day) at a job I was horrible at and hated/feared every minute of, but I'd given my word to the girl that recruited me for it that I wouldn't quit, so I didn't.

After 12 weeks of that I was so fried, I needed some sort of cathartic release. So I wrote exactly what I was feeling, but as the journal of a fantasy character in a hopeless war (since that's about how I felt).

I wrote several of these entries, and when I finally finished the job, began realizing a whole world was evolving in my head out of those journal entries I wrote. So I began writing it down.

C.bronco
09-14-2006, 05:17 AM
I blame my parents. I wrote my first "book" at age four. It was very short, minimalist. Then, on a rainy day at age 8, my older brother suggested we write novels. His came to 4 pages, and I'll never forget, it was entitled "The Devil's Slaughterhouse." I was so impressed that he used the word "authentic" even though he thought it meant something else. I took his word for it. Mine was a one page masterpiece in which JFK and Queen Mary (okay, I was eight) were abducted by Venutians while having tea on a veranda at the White House.
There's something in our DNA, call it contamination I guess.

ChaosTitan
09-14-2006, 06:05 AM
Is it sad that I don't know what inspired me to begin to write? I remember when I started writing original fiction (7th grade). I remember what that story was (typical teenage angst in the vein of Saved by the Bell).

But I cannot remember what possessed me to pick up a black and white marble notebook and actually write that story down.

I'm just glad that I did.

Etola
09-14-2006, 10:40 PM
I blame my parents. I wrote my first "book" at age four. It was very short, minimalist. Then, on a rainy day at age 8, my older brother suggested we write novels. His came to 4 pages, and I'll never forget, it was entitled "The Devil's Slaughterhouse." I was so impressed that he used the word "authentic" even though he thought it meant something else. I took his word for it. Mine was a one page masterpiece in which JFK and Queen Mary (okay, I was eight) were abducted by Venutians while having tea on a veranda at the White House.
There's something in our DNA, call it contamination I guess.

Hmmm...that does remind me of the first 'book' I ever made, when I was really little (9, maybe?). It was actually just a series of crayon fish drawings (we had just gotten an aquarium and I became obsessed with tropical fish!), and a few written 'fish facts' I'd gotten out of books, stapled together between two pieces of construction paper. I still have it, somewhere.

yanallefish
09-15-2006, 11:45 AM
Wow, I'm getting flashbacks now... I wrote some story about a blue bear when I was in preschool. I remember them being sufficiently impressed that they had me read it to the principal (the place I was, it was sort of a mix between preschool, kindergarten and regular school). Though I don't remember the story now, other than that!

C.bronco
09-15-2006, 09:53 PM
I still have my younger brother's first book which he wrote and illustrated in first grade. It inspired him to do a series! Everyone in my immediate family writes.

Etola
09-15-2006, 10:57 PM
I still have my younger brother's first book which he wrote and illustrated in first grade. It inspired him to do a series! Everyone in my immediate family writes.

You know, on a slightly different topic, sometimes I really envy people who come from families of fellow readers and writers. I have a close friend whose parents chose her name based on what they thought would be a good 'writer' name. I'd be in paradise if a friend invited me over to their house and I saw an actual bookshelf full of well-thumbed novels. It's just mind-boggling, and I can't imagine how nice it must be to have had that kind of support and encouragement at a young age.

My parents, on really rare occasions, would hand me an article about writing or an ad for a writing contest. But neither of them were really fiction writers, or even just creative people, so I think they were a little stymied on how to approach it, so they just didn't say much. I wrote because I loved to write, but I had to find my inspiration and encouragement outside the home, at the library or online.

Alex Bravo
09-16-2006, 07:25 PM
Martian Tales of Edgar Rice Burroughs

karo.ambrose
09-16-2006, 08:55 PM
i started writing when i was in 5th grade when our teacher gave us a creative writing assignment. i fell in love with it and even after the assignment was over, i kept writing these little novels that, in hindsight, were hilariously bad. i was enamored by the whole concept that no matter how much our world sucks, we can escape to our own. so... reiterating what a lot of people have already said... my writing is kind of an extension of my daydreaming.

veinglory
09-16-2006, 09:07 PM
boredom

oh, and greed--also vanity

Ssressturl
09-17-2006, 12:14 AM
For me, it was the idea that I could create a universe in which no-one has been in before. That everything in that universe would be of my intelligence and imagination, not a replica of an overdone species.

Snitchcat
09-18-2006, 12:34 PM
Writing is a natural extension of my daydreaming. (^_^)

DragonHeart
09-18-2006, 07:17 PM
I've been writing since I learned how, but it took a very strange mix of elements to bring the idea from a hobby to a possible (and probable) career.

It started with video games. I've been gaming for years and most of my friends are gamers as well. After my best friend jumpstarted my obsession with the Final Fantasy series, another friend sent me a link to what would become my first online forum. The Final Fantasy forums. This was about five years ago, and I was still pretty new to the whole internet thing. Anyways, I registered the very same day, and he decided to "train" me in a thing called RPB, Role Play Battling. Yes, geek to the max lol.

So anyways, we did one practice battle, in which Kylista, my first character, was created. To be honest, my writing sucked majorly. After my friend logged off, I started looking at the other battles, and found that some of them had hugely detailed characters, with entire histories and backgrounds and all these incredible fighting styles.

The more I read, the more I started writing. Kylista started evolving, changing from the most basic of cliche fantasy warriors into one with more than just a few notes; she had a story to tell, and she wanted me to tell it.

I continued this for a couple of years, and improved my writing by leaps and bounds. Then I got into Role Playing, which is basically cowriting stories with other people, with more depths than the battles could ever wish to have. That improved my writing even more.

Then I hit sophomore year in high school. My English teacher was amazing. She gave us assignments I was interested in, so I actually started doing them. (I tended not to do things I didn't like back then; a bad habit, I know.) So anyways, one of the last assignments of the year was a two-page creative myth with no other requirements. The two-page myth turned into a ten-page monster about Kylista. Back then, that was a lot of writing to me. The feedback she gave me on that myth is what counts; it completely changed the way I write. I also learned how to self-edit after that.

And now my writing just keeps evolving. It's like the dam broke and all the ideas hidden in the back of my mind woke up and that's when I figured my career had chosen me.

As for The Final Fantasy, five years later and I'm still there. And Kylista? She's waiting patiently for me to tell her story. It will be told, but only when I feel that my writing is strong enough to support everything she has to say. It will be a long story, and I'll make sure I get it right. I've been building her world for the past five years, and will continue doing so until I feel ready to put it all to paper...or screen, in this case.

~DragonHeart~

Etola
09-18-2006, 07:30 PM
Then I hit sophomore year in high school. My English teacher was amazing. She gave us assignments I was interested in, so I actually started doing them. (I tended not to do things I didn't like back then; a bad habit, I know.) So anyways, one of the last assignments of the year was a two-page creative myth with no other requirements. The two-page myth turned into a ten-page monster about Kylista. Back then, that was a lot of writing to me. The feedback she gave me on that myth is what counts; it completely changed the way I write. I also learned how to self-edit after that.

And now my writing just keeps evolving. It's like the dam broke and all the ideas hidden in the back of my mind woke up and that's when I figured my career had chosen me.

As for The Final Fantasy, five years later and I'm still there. And Kylista? She's waiting patiently for me to tell her story. It will be told, but only when I feel that my writing is strong enough to support everything she has to say. It will be a long story, and I'll make sure I get it right. I've been building her world for the past five years, and will continue doing so until I feel ready to put it all to paper...or screen, in this case.

~DragonHeart~

That's really cool :) I had a similar experience, although my first novel main character evolved from a Magic: The Gathering fanfic whom I then moved over to an online Usenet role-playing forum.

And as for high school english teachers....Even their slightest actions (in the form of comments or assignments) can have so much influence on budding writers. Writers should celebrate English Teacher Day or something.

Jack_Roberts
09-18-2006, 07:42 PM
Remember the feeling of infatuation? The longing to be with someone, no matter the time or place?
Now take that feeling, and focus it on a fictional character.

The problem? Said fictional character doesn’t exist. No, I don’t just meant “doesn’t exist” as in the character is not real. That’s true too. I mean the character has never been created, written or anything. It’s more of a feeling.

As I’ve said in other threads, I was watching (I’ve never read the book, only seen the movie) Interview With a Vampire and I could not get something out of my head.
I thought it was Claudia, but after half a week of searching for Claudia on the web, I realized that wasn’t it.

So, I did what any message board/ story writing group member would do. I decided to create her in my own story.

I sat back and thought about who this child vampire would be.
Then, honestly, there she was in my mind. I saw her bushy red curls, her impish vampiric grin, and her old style dress and crimson cloak.
She was brave, determined, single-minded, very intelligent, compassionate and spunky.
She walked into my mind with confidence. Then her brother followed behind, over excited and ready for adventure. Defiantly clueless and older by two years, he would always follow her lead.

I wrote a very lame story for my friends. It was lame because something inside shouted that it was not her. I felt that urge inside to be with her so I wrote another and another. My online friends were freaking out because each story showed her change. She was becoming who she needed to be.

Then I couldn’t shake the feeling, urge, desire, to take her further. She HAD to touch others. Maybe they would gain courage or strength from her. Maybe they would care for others like she cared for other scared children. I don’t know, but she had to get out there. Out of the net and into the real world.

So I began a novel. I have never written anything like that before. I heard and worried that it had to be at least 20,000 words. Seemed a lot to me at the time. I didn’t care. The feeling inside continued to pull at me.

Ever get a urge to visit your favorite book or TV show or movie? I had/have that urge for her. The only way it goes away is if I either write or read her story.

I was worried about making 20,000 words. By the time “she” finished “her” first book, there was 89,000 words. She won’t stop either. Book two, covering her next ten years of vampire life is a quarter of the way written.

I figured it was just me. My crazyness. So I gave it to nine people to read. Some I barely knew. One guy, a teacher, I called out of the blue! Never knew him before I asked him to read. Now he wants to read it to his 5th grade class.
I still feel like I’m on a train and I’ve no clue where it’s going. It’s very, very weird but I’m just hanging on for the ride.

DragonHeart
09-18-2006, 07:43 PM
And as for high school english teachers....Even their slightest actions (in the form of comments or assignments) can have so much influence on budding writers. Writers should celebrate English Teacher Day or something.

I definitely agree with that. :) Even after I left her class, I kept in touch until graduation last year, and she was always willing to look over my latest work. I used to spend most of my free periods senior year in the English office. I learned a lot that year, and I truly believe that if I hadn't had that kind of guidance for my writing, I wouldn't be where I am now. It wasn't a stable time for me at home, with a nasty custody battle still raging from my parent's divorce and all, so that was one of the few things I felt I could rely on. It was the best experience I ever had from school.

~DragonHeart~

Bibsy
09-18-2006, 10:06 PM
The voices told me to start writing or they would blow up the Earth.

But seriously, it's my mother's fault. I was making up some wacky adventure for my stuffed animals to embark on and asked her to come watch. Being rather busy and wanting to get me out of her hair, she told me to go write it down. Much to her surprise, my obedient 8-year-old self did just that. I still have a copy of the 3-page play that resulted--quite the potential copyright-infringement fest since it starred Thumper. :D

Ever since then, writing down whatever wacky idea came into my head seemed like the most natural thing to do.

Akiahara
09-18-2006, 11:07 PM
i'm really into the whole supernatural thing... Laurell K. Hamilton, Kim Harrison, Kelley Armstrong, Charlaine Harris. when i went through all their books... several times, i went looking for other authors who wrote about vampires and other preternatural creatures.

then i happened upon the whole supernatural romance phenomena. Sherrilyn Kenyon and Christine Feehan, namely. some of them were okay. the whole dark hunter thing is something new, imo. well, something slightly different, i should say. but i decided when i read Christine Feehan's Carpathian series that this was ridiculous. if i had to read "molten lava" and any body part being "drawn tight", my head would explode. so, i wrote.

i wanted to have a little bit of humor in what i wrote, some violence, some romance, etc., etc. since i have such a hard time finding authors that i love, i decided i'd write myself. if nothing else, it keeps me from going to through books so fast that i run out of new writers that interest me.

Jamesaritchie
09-18-2006, 11:38 PM
It wasn't a great work of literature or anything. What "inspired" me to write was when I saw The Fast and the Furious. I walked out of the theater thinking, "I could write a better script than that!"

Well, I took too much time at it, and the script was meant to skewer a few cliches in the automotive world that are much less realistic nowadays. But I started writing more stuff after that.

I LOVED that movie.

TheIT
09-19-2006, 12:10 AM
Ever since I was a little girl I said to myself that one day I would write books like all the ones I loved to read. One day didn't arrive until about six years ago when I picked up the novelization of my favorite mini-series and realized just how bad the writing was. I said to myself that I could write better than that, and I've been trying ever since.

darkkazier
09-19-2006, 03:09 AM
Well i was doing somethiing called RPing in this place called Ayenee in Yahoo chat years ago and basically you are writing interactive stories, it was great. I ran into a character called Drzzit (lol) and i found out about the Drizzit books, bought them all, and started then. Then I quit and a few years later i saw the LotR movies and got my old halfway completed manuscrpt out at work and decided to finish writing it. I scrapped it and started from scratch on the new one. but i suppose it was RPing (Role playing).

Etola
09-19-2006, 06:42 AM
I definitely agree with that. :) Even after I left her class, I kept in touch until graduation last year, and she was always willing to look over my latest work. I used to spend most of my free periods senior year in the English office. I learned a lot that year, and I truly believe that if I hadn't had that kind of guidance for my writing, I wouldn't be where I am now. It wasn't a stable time for me at home, with a nasty custody battle still raging from my parent's divorce and all, so that was one of the few things I felt I could rely on. It was the best experience I ever had from school.

~DragonHeart~

Hmm...Never had quite that good an experience with a high school English teacher, but one of them had me submit to a writing contest, and another always encouraged me and wrote glowing comments in the margins of my essays and stories. The best compliment I ever got was on a short story of mine, where she wrote "You've done the impossible--write a fantasy that keeps me interested!" (she wasn't a fantasy reader).

Shweta
09-19-2006, 01:09 PM
I had a rocking English teacher who was an SF fan. He got me into the Heinein juveniles, and even lent me his own books once (The Left Hand of Darkness and The Player of Games -- still two of my utter favourites).

He despised fantasy, but would still read mine, and encouraged my writing a lot; but that was High School, and I'd been writing since I was six or so, so I can't say he inspired me to begin. Possibly to continue.

Selcaby
09-24-2006, 02:50 AM
I was fifteen. I read a book in which there was a character who-- Well, I'm not going to recount the plot here. But the first three quarters of the book were about something else. And then he sauntered onstage -- and you realised he'd been there all along really -- and warped the book into a totally different shape. I couldn't get him out of my mind for months. I believe that in some way he's affected everything I've done since (except what I do for a living - I think I'd be doing that without him, probably better). No, I wasn't in love with him, and in fact it was his life story not his personality that grabbed me most. In the end I got rid of him by deciding there ought to be a whole book about someone with a life like his. So I started writing one. The rest is history.

Atlantis
09-24-2006, 04:33 AM
It was alot of things for me. Part of me has always been a writer. I've been writing my own stories and telling them to other people since preschool. I have memories of making stapled "picture books" in pre school for my teachers then being too shy to give them over so I left hidden in the classroom for my teachers to find instead. I've always been a story teller and probably would have become a writer anyway, the thing that really sent me in the direction though was two things, my dyspraxia and the fact that I was bullied at school. I have a mild form of brain damage called dyspraxia that affects my muscles, my memory, my speech and my social skills, among other things. It makes me anxious and shy. Because of my shyness, I never had alot of friends, so I was teased alot. Kids would rip my skirt off then run off leaving me standing in my underwear in the middle of the school yard. Writing, for me, was therapy. It helped me escape from the harsh realities of school, gave me wings to fly. I created my own picture perfect worlds where my best friends were fairies and I had magic powers. So that's why I became a writer, to keep my sanity from the bullies who were so determined to take it.

Vincent
09-24-2006, 07:28 AM
An angel descended in a fiery chariot and presented me with a golden quill, proclaiming I would one day write prose so beautiful, so powerful, it would make grown men cry, and bring nations to their knees.

And I like to tell stories.

HorrorWriter
09-25-2006, 10:57 PM
I have actually been writing since middle school, but only began taking it seriously in the past 10 years, so I wasted a good bit of writing time...a-hem. But now, after seeing the error of my ways, I now write a great deal. :Hammer:

Inkdaub
09-27-2006, 03:03 PM
I have always been attracted to writing but the day I actually sat down of my own volition I was inspired by a Wolverine Vs Spiderman comicbook that took place in Berlin. My resulting short story was a total ripoff of this comic.

glutton
09-27-2006, 05:52 PM
Since before I can remember, I've been in love with the idea of a female warrior. But I noticed that warrioresses in fantasy tend to be typecast, and very few matched my ideal (i.e. a physically dominant fighter who fights "big guy" style, can stand toe-to-toe with huge men in wrestling and brawling, and has ridiculous+ damage soak). Certainly, I haven't read many books where the main female was a big powerhouse. I wanted a heroine in the mold of a Beowulf or Ajax or Druss or Conan, a mountain of a woman who didn't rely on fancy flips to be deadly, but was a paragon of endurance and tenacity. So I started writing a story about Rose, a hulking, scar-covered, nearly indestructible young woman who was already a veteran of many battles and was falling in love with her giant male partner (who also loves her, but is somewhat jealous of her greater ability in combat). Now I have eight Rose books, a novel about another big female warrior, and tons of short stories about Rose and other rough and tough chicks.

tigaseren
09-30-2006, 10:06 PM
My parents read to me from a very young age and writing also seemed like second nature to me. I wrote my first 'story' (about an eagle who had to move her nest to a flag pole in a baseball stadium) when I was so young my mom was taking dictation for me. I read the Hobbit when I was 6 by myself for the first time and between it, The Dark Crystal, and Star Trek (Spock) I started creating other worlds and races for my stories. I started writing for real in about 4th grade, although the earliest still surviving manuscript is about 20 pages from a 100 page book that I did in 5th grade. I've always written because I HAVE to share the stories inside of me. I've only recently felt a need to publish, but it has always been my goal in life to introduce my characters and worlds to as many other people as possible. There is a quote (which unfortunately I have to paraphrase because I know longer have the book) from a 'how to' creative writing book that sums it up for me. "great writers don't write to publish, they write because they have to."

Jongfan
09-30-2006, 10:48 PM
I have always loved to read,,, I remember when I was finally old enough to get my fist Library card on my own... it was amazing to be able to take books home to read. Now in my grown up world, I still enjoy reading and I am intrigued by the mind of the author. Erica Jong, Ann Rice, John Grisham, Ann Rule, Patricia Cornwell, all write well, my favorite of course is Erica Jong, she has a way of sucking you in, putting you in the setting and feeling what her character is feeling. Now I thought, I want to do that, I feel I have a vivid imagination, creative mind and a large Family LOL.. lots of ideas..

Nateskate
09-30-2006, 11:17 PM
I've been making up stories for much of my life. Even pre-school, I had my brother believing I was visiting a fantasy realm while he slept, and used it to manipulate him. "Sure I'll wake you next time the fairies come...if you do this for me..." I'd even convinced him I did take him but he was having amnesia.