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kilamangiro
08-21-2006, 05:25 AM
What's your favourite Roald Dahl book?

Mine is probably Matilda. I love the scene where Ms Trunchbull hammer throws the little pig-tailed girl. Hilarious . . . and slightly alarming.
The Witches as well. Terrifying.
The Twits.
I could go on.

Christine N.
08-21-2006, 05:32 AM
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. It's just so... weird.

That or The Witches. Must have read that four or five times in elementary school.

Unique
08-21-2006, 02:59 PM
"the chokey!"

"....much too good for children..."

Funny how words and phrases end up in our family vocabulary.
I love Matilda. She's my hero.

KTC
08-21-2006, 03:00 PM
I love them all. He was my escape as a kid. I can't pick a favourite.

Christine N.
08-21-2006, 05:05 PM
I picked up a new copy of James and the Giant Peach and a hardback double copy of the Charlie/Chocolate books. I'm putting them into my substitute bag to read to elementary classes during yucky weather, or when they've been good and deserve a treat.

trumancoyote
08-22-2006, 11:52 PM
Ooh, it's all about the Twits.

Roald Dahl was an absolutely batty genius.

Vincent
08-23-2006, 12:41 AM
Has anyone read his adult short stories? There's some seriously weird stuff going on there too.

Evaine
08-23-2006, 02:36 PM
Tales of the Unexpected was made into a TV series in the UK about 20 years ago - seriously scary stuff.

Sesselja
08-23-2006, 03:20 PM
Has anyone read his adult short stories? There's some seriously weird stuff going on there too.

Since reading Dahl's short stories years ago, I now think of him whenever I see a frozen leg of lamb.

Kida Adelyne
08-24-2006, 06:57 AM
My favourite was always 'Fantastic Mr. Fox.'

Weirdly enough, I have never acctually read Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

jst5150
08-24-2006, 06:58 AM
I've never read him, but, I've always felt someone should buy him an 'N'. :-)

ChaosTitan
08-25-2006, 12:22 AM
:eek: :Jaw: :eek:

I don't believe this.

My entire friggin life (okay, so actually only since I was able to read) I thought his name was Ronald. I swear. I never, ever realized it says Roald. Until just now, and when I picked up my copy of "Charlie..." to confirm it.

I am speechless. And a little mortified. :gone:

Picking a favorite is difficult, but I think that I reread "The Witches" more times than any of his other books. Something about being turned into a mouse (changing into something other than what we are) just sparked my imagination.

Soccer Mom
08-25-2006, 12:38 AM
He is one of my inspirations for writing children/YA. Who says kids don't want things twisted and weird? They absolutely do!

JumpingJack
08-25-2006, 03:51 AM
Danny the champion of the world, i've read it a hundred times at least and will read it a hundred more.
One of the most amazing and beautiful tales ever crafter by the hand of a writer. Divine madness was his gift.

Apart from my wife's encouragement and the vision and hope that one day my little girl might just like something that i write (15 months old and my whole world evolves around her), his work is reason i believe in stories.

Maprilynne
08-25-2006, 08:08 AM
I am all about Fantastic Mr. Fox!

persiphone_hellecat
08-25-2006, 10:59 AM
I love them all, too. I was always a fan of his - we share a birthday.

Sesselja
08-25-2006, 11:56 AM
My entire friggin life (okay, so actually only since I was able to read) I thought his name was Ronald. I swear. I never, ever realized it says Roald.

Roald is a Norwegian name, and Dahl's parents were Norwegians - which explains the lack of N. :)

JerseyGirl1962
08-25-2006, 06:12 PM
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory & James and the Giant Peach. I can't say how many times I read those books as a kid...but I think I wore out the covers from taking them out of the library so many times!

~Nancy

ChaosTitan
08-25-2006, 08:08 PM
Roald is a Norwegian name, and Dahl's parents were Norwegians - which explains the lack of N. :)

I guess my brain is just trained to see the N there. :tongue

Evaine
08-28-2006, 10:56 PM
He also grew up in Wales - there's now a Roald Dahl Place (or possibly Square) in Cardiff to commemorate him.

SherryTex
08-29-2006, 01:55 AM
LOVE THE BFG and BOY! --great sense of humor.

dceptiveophelia
08-29-2006, 03:33 AM
For some reason, his books were never introduced to me when I was growing up. None of my teachers ever mentioned him. Last semester I took a comic lit class where we read Switch *****. It was my first reading of his, and I did enjoy it. It made me want to read more.

littlewriter
09-20-2006, 05:46 PM
I read the BFG about a million times throughout my childhood, so I think that is my favourite, although I love all his other ones aswell. I recently bought a box set of all his books to give to my son. He's only 1 year old but I'm sure he'll love them as much as I did when he is able to read.

BooRadley65
09-20-2006, 06:29 PM
My favorite is a short story by Dahl.

Lamb to the Slaughter

One of the best I've ever read.

Lisa

wordmonkey
09-20-2006, 08:15 PM
Fantastic Mr. Fox.

Not even a question in my mind. That book is magic.

Lyra Jean
09-21-2006, 12:18 AM
Although I like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. My favorite is James and the Giant Peach. Okay I haven't read anything else by him but will keep an eye out for his stuff.

Sarita
09-21-2006, 12:26 AM
James and the Giant Peach. Dan and I read it aloud to Finn and he loved it, especially the pictures of the peach.

I also really love the Tales of the Unexpected. I've never read The Witches. Should I?

Christine N.
09-21-2006, 12:51 AM
Oh, yes, DO get the Witches. Then go rent the movie. Anjelica Huston is divinely bad.

Ralyks
09-23-2006, 01:55 AM
My favorite is a short story by Dahl.

Lamb to the Slaughter

One of the best I've ever read.

Lisa



Dahll wrote that? Was that the one where SPOILER the wife fed the murder weapon to the cops?

James... stuck with me most of the 4 novels I read as a kid.

samgail
09-25-2006, 05:13 AM
When we lost all our books last year in a house fire our friends helped us replenish our library. They knew how much we all loved Raold Dahl and between them replaced every one. We have really loved reading them but i don't think we could pick one favorite. Matilda, James and The Giant Peach and Witches will get read the most. He wrote some incredibly imaginitave stories.

DwayneA
09-23-2009, 12:40 AM
I've read both books starring poverty stricken Charlie Bucket and seen both movies for the first book.

Is it me, or do the five children represent some of the seven deadly sins?

Also, in the first book, it said that the grandparents were over ninety. Yet in the sequel, some of them are revealed to be only eighty. I think this is an error.

I much preferred the first book to the sequel.

Kitty Pryde
09-23-2009, 12:58 AM
I dunno, most of the kids represent greed. In general, I think they more likely represent what Roald Dahl saw as bad habits of little kids in that era.

PS If you click here, The Times Online has a "deleted scene" that was cut from the first book right before it was published: http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/books/article546539.ece One extra kid gets her comeuppance, in a particularly gruesome way :D

Roald Dahl wrote, in addition to all his great kids' books, a lot of short stories for adults. They are sick and twisted and a lot of fun to read.

BigWords
09-23-2009, 01:11 AM
The Roald Dahl television series Tales Of The Unexpected is fantastic.

Starhorsepax
09-23-2009, 03:20 AM
I wonder about the sin of gluttony. Can anyone read Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and not find themselves reaching for a chocolate candy? :Cake:
And the kids seemed to be reflections of equally vice ridden parents. (Oh of course I'll buy you every candy bar in the whole country...):crazy:

DwayneA
09-23-2009, 07:22 AM
I heard Roald Dahl hated the first movie so much, he wouldn't sell movie rights for his books anymore.

backslashbaby
09-24-2009, 07:19 AM
That movie gave me the worst nightmares! I was very literal as a kid, and some of the things just squicked me out. My siblings could sing the oompa-loompa song and make me scream :D

Our teacher read us the book. Still very odd. Now I love odd :D

Greed, spoiled behavior, and I can't quite remember the factory owner's motivations, but I always suspected they were suspect ;)

C.bronco
09-24-2009, 07:23 AM
I read that book 4 or 5 times when I was a kid.

Morality tale? You betcha!

DwayneA
09-24-2009, 10:46 PM
No, I'm not talking about the weapon from the Doom series. I'm talking about another of Roald Dahl's books.

The BFG is the story of an orphan named Sophie who is taken from her bed one night to giant land by the Big Friendly Giant who goes out every night blowing dreams to children around the world. All nine other giants in Giant Land go out every night and eat people. With the help from the Queen of England and the army, Sophie and the BFG come up with a plan to end their menace forever.

I found it an enjoyable read although it's hard to understand what the BFG says as he talks with a strange accent. And another thing, how can giants just appear as the BFG says? So much doesn't make sense to me.

Has anyone else read it?

Sarpedon
09-24-2009, 11:17 PM
I've read it, and I don't always expect children's books to always make sense. How do the monsters get under the bed to begin with?

I was a big Dahl fan when I was a lad.

DwayneA
10-31-2009, 08:10 PM
As far as I remember, this was Roald Dahl's first children's book. It's the story of an orphan boy living with his two horrible aunts who comes into possession of magical crocodile tongues which break out of the sack and enchant a peach tree that has never grown any fruit. A giant peach grows and the aunts make use of the opportunity to make some money off of it. James discovers that inside the peach are giant humanoid insects that also swallowed some of the crocodile tongues and became enchanted themselves. Escaping inside the giant peach and landing in the ocean, with help from over five hundred sea gulls, they fly onward to a new life in America.

I enjoyed this book, but I have a few complaints. First of all, James' parents were eaten by a rhino according to the book. Aren't they herbivores? Aunt Sponge and Aunt Spiker are never given a reason to abuse James. To me they are completely two-dimensional, there is nothing to like about them. There's also hardly any character development and no growth.

James and the Giant Peach is one of those books where the movie is better. At least that movie had things the book lacked, such as characer development and growth. I liked how James braved his fear of the rhino and stood up to his aunts. Even the author's widow said he would have been delighted at what the film makers did to James.

I quite agree.

Jess Haines
10-31-2009, 11:10 PM
Really? I enjoyed the book when I was a kid. Didn't care much for the movie, though I was an adult when it came out. Felt like it... bastardized the story somehow. It's been a while, so it is hard for me to say exactly what it was about it that rubbed me the wrong way.

Calla Lily
11-01-2009, 12:09 AM
I loved this book in every way possible as a kid. My kids loved it too, to a lesser degree. I've never seen the movie because I don't want to kill my mental images of it. (Same reason I've avoided movies of A Little Princess, A Wrinkle in Time, and The Secret Garden.)

Toothpaste
11-01-2009, 12:35 AM
The story isn't realistic. The parents being eaten is extremely far fetched. Being eaten by a rhino even more so. It plays to childhood fears which are often founded on impossibilities. It's like kids playing make believe: "Oh and then, and then the parents are eaten by a rhino!" "Awesome. Okay and then we find the cave where . . . "

fringle
11-06-2009, 02:51 PM
First of all, James' parents were eaten by a rhino according to the book. Aren't they herbivores? Aunt Sponge and Aunt Spiker are never given a reason to abuse James. To me they are completely two-dimensional, there is nothing to like about them. There's also hardly any character development and no growth.

Err, yeah and then he hops aboard a giant peach with giant talking insects and flies over the Atlantic until he, the bugs and his peach get spiked onto the top of the Empire
State Building. Why? Because that's awesome and kids dig it.

defcon6000
11-06-2009, 03:36 PM
I enjoyed this book, but I have a few complaints. First of all, James' parents were eaten by a rhino according to the book. Aren't they herbivores? Aunt Sponge and Aunt Spiker are never given a reason to abuse James. To me they are completely two-dimensional, there is nothing to like about them. There's also hardly any character development and no growth.
Well, it's a children's book so I'm betting he purposely made it silly because a) kids won't understand that it's impossible and b) kids like goofy stuff.

As for the abuse thing, that may have been innate thing for the Aunts. Not every act has to have a reason. Plus, we never got inside the Aunts' heads, so who knows if they did or did not have some sort of grudge against James.

I don't recall having an issue reading it when I was a kid. Sure, looking back at it now, it doesn't make sense, but then again, I'm an adult now...at least physically. :tongue

JimmyB27
11-06-2009, 04:35 PM
It makes perfect sense if James's parents were triffids.

*NeW*WrItEr*
11-07-2009, 09:41 PM
Is it really a good book/movie? I've never read the book or seen the movie. But, I'm interested a bit from what you all have commented.

Calla Lily
11-07-2009, 09:55 PM
The book is wonderful.

DwayneA
01-06-2011, 08:43 AM
This is another one of Roald Dahl's stories. The plot focuses on a boy named George who mixes up a whole bunch of ingredients (most of which are harmful) and animal pills to make his grandmother (whom he believes to be a witch) a better person. But what he doesn't expect is for her to grow taller than the house and fatten the livestock on the farm where he lives. After several failed attempts at making new batches of the medicine as his father sees a business opportunity, they make a batch causes grandma to shrink into nothing and disappear completely.

I bought this book off ebay, got it today, and finished reading it an hour later. It was a very good read, but I have some issues about the story.

First of all, George mixes up a whole bunch of harmful substances together. In real life, wouldn't this harm or even kill someone when indigested? This may give children the wrong idea that it doesn't actually and they may be tempted to try it at home.

Also, is it me, or do Roald Dahl's stories lack character development? The characters never grow (except in the case of grandma and several animals, quite literally), change (same case as above), or learn anything.

Still, it was an enjoyable read.

seun
01-15-2011, 05:20 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iCvg_y-jgpI&playnext=1&list=PL085B78BAFF7BF9DE&index=38

scarletpeaches
01-15-2011, 06:56 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iCvg_y-jgpI&playnext=1&list=PL085B78BAFF7BF9DE&index=38Gawd bless yer, Sir! I remember watching that and loving it.

I remember him being interviewed in the broom cupboard on CBBC and saying, "Remember kids...don't feed your grandmother medicine like this...

...save it for your teachers instead."

:D

seun
01-15-2011, 07:00 PM
I'm not the biggest Dahl fan in the world, but this one was a classic.

DwayneA
02-02-2011, 07:57 AM
This is another story by Roald Dahl that I read. It's about a boy and his grandmother who spend a holiday in a hotel where all the witches in England have gathered for an anual conference on how to kill children. He is turned into a mouse by them and he spends the rest of the book in that form. With help from his grandmother, a former witch hunter, he turns the tables on the England witches, even the Grand High Witch herself, by literally giving them a taste of their own medicine (a potion that turns people into mice).

British feminists have called the book sexist due to its portrayal of witches as women, but aren't all witches women? The narrator says so himself.

The narrator and his grandmother never have their names revealed, neither do any of the witches. In fact, the only characters with names aren't even important to the story, such as Bruno Jenkins, a boy who also gets turned into a mouse.

Also, the conference itself takes up - get this - a quarter of the book!

The book seems to have a bit of a bittersweet ending because the narrator spends the rest of his life as a mouse and his lifespan will be greatly reduced because of it. In the movie that this book was based on, he gets restored to his human form. (another movie based on his works that Mr. Dahl didn't like)

But other than these issues, it was a very good read.

Bron
02-02-2011, 03:32 PM
I loved this book when I was a kid. And yes, all witches are women but you could argue that Dahl could have included warlocks or something so that the evil people weren't only female. But the most kick-ass person in the book (as I remember it) is the grandmother, also a woman.

Now you've made me want to go back and read it again :-)

Rose de Guzman
02-02-2011, 05:00 PM
I loved this book when I was a kid. And yes, all witches are women but you could argue that Dahl could have included warlocks or something so that the evil people weren't only female. But the most kick-ass person in the book (as I remember it) is the grandmother, also a woman.

Now you've made me want to go back and read it again :-)

Loved it as a kid too. I'd totally re-read it if it wasn't at my parents' house, still, hundreds of miles away.

I didnt have a problem with the witches being women, especially with his grandma being such a hero. Sure, all the bad people were women, but all the women were not bad. It's a bit like saying old westerns are bad when all the outlaws are men, while ignoring the fact that the hero is a man also.

jkababy
02-02-2011, 08:28 PM
I love this book. Roald Dahl is my straight up hero. I bought the movie for my little ones and we quote it often. Feminists need to get over themselves. The book is called "The Witches", not "The Warlocks".

GCU_Dramatic Exit
02-18-2011, 03:27 AM
I love The Witches. The thing I love about Dahl's writing is that he isn't afraid to go a bit dark, a bit scary. He doesn't treat his readers like dummies.

Satori1977
02-18-2011, 06:53 PM
I loved this book as a kid, I had forgotten about it until this thread. I think I should pick it up for my daughter, she might like it (though I will probably read it myself first, I don't remember how dark it is).

As for all witches being women, I am a little confused. Do you mean in the book, or in real life? In the book, yes, they are only women. In most books and movies they are. If you are talking about real life practioners of Wicca and Witchcraft, then men are called witches too. Warlocks are something in fiction only.

BjornAbust
02-26-2011, 03:25 PM
When I was in third or fourth grade one of my teachers read it to my class. It's a pretty good story, all things considered. I know I've got a copy of it sitting around here somewhere...

ceenindee
02-26-2011, 10:52 PM
My teacher read this to us in the fourth grade, and I specifically remember this one line that was like, "Anyone can be a witch...even your sweet teacher reading this to you right now," or something like that. Also I wouldn't eat hotel food for a year. It terrified me. But I loved it. The BFG too. :)

S.J.
02-27-2011, 01:24 AM
I looooved this book. Roald Dahl is amazing. So is Quentin Blake, who did the illustrations in my copy. There was one page where the witch takes off her mask and I was so terrified I had to skip it...

Don't you just love books that scar children for life? :)

Rowan
02-27-2011, 05:47 AM
As for all witches being women, I am a little confused. Do you mean in the book, or in real life? In the book, yes, they are only women. In most books and movies they are. If you are talking about real life practioners of Wicca and Witchcraft, then men are called witches too. Warlocks are something in fiction only.

Exactly. :)

Anaquana
02-27-2011, 07:45 AM
Warlocks are something in fiction only.

Not 100% true. There is a movement being made by quite a few male practitioners to reclaim the word warlock just as the word witch has been reclaimed. Storm FaeryWolf's Article on Witchvox (http://www.witchvox.com/va/dt_va.html?a=usca&c=words&id=14086).

lvae
03-02-2011, 02:59 PM
It's one of my favourite Roald Dahl books. I remember it being read aloud in class as well. The witches with their inky blue tongues, wigs and square hands and feet!

Was it ever made into a movie? James and the Giant Peach got made into CGI animation, BFG got animated, and so did the Minpins... and the other book that involved a giraffe and a lolly shop, I can't remember the title of anymore...

Tinkerbelll
06-09-2012, 05:22 PM
Absolutely Mathilda

JadeKnight
08-07-2012, 11:06 AM
I love them all. He was my escape as a kid. I can't pick a favourite.
OMGosh! Same here! I was just as picky about reading then as I am now, but man were those books awesome! I forget the title, but it was the one where the furniture was glued to the ceiling, lol. It's silly, but that memory has stayed with me since I read it :P Maybe I'll consider picking one up and reading it, he, he.

Fuchsia
08-25-2012, 05:49 AM
I still have my copy of Matilda that my parents got for me when I was ten. It's very rare - at least in my limited experience - to find a story about a little girl who is an actual genius.

A lot of children's stories portray girls as being "smart," sure, but it's only because they study all the time. It's like being "the smart one" is a consolation prize for not having been born a boy or something.

Matilda, though, was a real-live genius who was smart because she just WAS. She taught herself to read at age two, she can do complex math without a calculator... she was - IS - my hero.

That book also introduced me to the poetry of Dylan Thomas - at age nine. I had no idea what Miss Honey was talking about when she quoted those lines from "In Country Sleep," but I sensed magic. She also said about that poem, "It is music." Right on, Miss Honey. Right on.

The movie version of Matilda, though, was an abomination. Eff Danny de Vito.

Final thought: I also really liked Danny Champion of the World, though I only remember it dimly.