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seun
08-12-2006, 05:30 PM
I've never been sure about this. I remember reading books when I was younger that used 'til as a contraction of until but it seems to have gone out of fashion. Till never seems right to me. Is there a hard rule for this one?

J. Weiland
08-12-2006, 06:23 PM
Have a look at this link,

http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-unt1.htm

, and notice the sentence that says, "But till is perfectly good English and the choice of whether to use it or until is often decided by the rhythm of the sentence."

No there is no hard rule. If till sounds better than until,then use it.

Hope this helps :)

seun
08-12-2006, 06:26 PM
Cheers. That's a big help. Thanks a lot. :)

Silver King
08-14-2006, 12:11 AM
There was a similar thread some time ago, and I believe it was Mr. Ritchie who made a comment that the word "until" is a perfectly good word on its own and never needs shortening. This came as a revelation to me, and I've used "until" ever since (to good effect, I think).

veinglory
08-14-2006, 12:28 AM
I use 'til -- mainly in dialogue. I see it written both ways 'til and till. The only one I don't like is til (no apostrophe)

Popeyesays
08-14-2006, 04:43 AM
I think "till" is used since it slips through MS spell check and is suggested whenever anyone writes "til". However "till" has only one meaning in the dictionary as "turn over the soil for planting"

I use the apostrophed version in dialogue and rarely use it in narrative sticking to "until".

Regards,
Scott

stormie
08-14-2006, 04:55 AM
I agree with Scott. In dialogue, 'til seems to work. Till reminds me of soil being turned over. And until is best.

Cath
08-14-2006, 05:37 AM
I agree - I would use 'til in dialogue because it is still in common use, but until in any other circumstance.

And I always use the 'til form because it is a contraction.

seun
08-14-2006, 12:35 PM
I have a tendency to use 'til or till in dialogue but as I said, till just doesn't feel completely right. :Shrug:

J. Weiland
08-15-2006, 01:46 PM
I have a tendency to use 'til or till in dialogue but as I said, till just doesn't feel completely right. :Shrug:

Could you post some small samples of dialogue with the wicked word in it; then I will tell you what I think about it.

Bufty
08-15-2006, 04:25 PM
"I won't be back till midnight." Nothing wrong with that dialogue to my eye. Depends upon the character, I guess.

FalconDance
08-15-2006, 05:32 PM
"I won't be back till midnight." Nothing wrong with that dialogue to my eye. Depends upon the character, I guess.

....except the word till is not a contraction or colloquialism to use in the place of until. :tongue

As mentioned, "till" means to turn over soil (as for a garden); it is also the money tray kept in inside a cash register.

rekirts
08-15-2006, 06:41 PM
My dictionary, The Oxford Complete Wordfinder, has 'till' listed 4 times.* According to this dictionary 'until' is used in formal style and at the beginning of a sentence, otherwise 'till' is perfectly acceptable.

*1. up to or as late as
2. a drawer for money in a store or bank
3. prepare and cultivate
4. stiff clay containing boulders, sand, etc., deposited by melting glaciers and ice sheets

ETA: Just as a point of interest, in the Anglican Book of Common Prayer, the marriage ceremony has this line:
I M. take thee N. to my wedded Wife, to have and to hold from this day forward, for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death us do part, according to God's holy ordinance; and thereto I plight thee my troth.

So even in formal style 'till' is used.