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Dollywagon
07-24-2006, 09:44 AM
Yes, I do know the difference, but what is the technical term for words that sound the same but are spelt differently?

I can't find my English grammar books. EEEEKKKKK!!!

And, while I'm at it, spelt and spelled - correct version please.

(How could I lose my books...where are they?...have I had a really spiteful burglar?)

poetinahat
07-24-2006, 10:05 AM
Homonym or homophone. The definitions I've viewed appear to be the same for these two words.

I believe 'spelt' is archaic but possibly still correct (but possibly only when used in passive voice, e.g. this word is spelt correctly); spelled is definitely correct.

reph
07-24-2006, 10:19 AM
"Spelt" is still used in England. In the U.S., we write "spelled," "leaned," and "burned," except for burnt toast, burnt sienna (a paint color), and sometimes other burnt/burned things. But we use "lent" as the past tense of "lend."

Dollywagon
07-24-2006, 11:05 AM
Wouldn't 'lent' be 'loaned,' Reph?

I actually hate the word spelt - it somehow looks and sounds so wrong.
I'll be going with spelled - UK publication or not.

Thanks for all your help. Very prompt it was too.

Now, if you could all just pop round and help me find my books.......!

poetinahat
07-24-2006, 11:09 AM
Wouldn't 'lent' be 'loaned,' Reph?
Oooooo... questioning reph! This ought to be good!

:popcorn:

Dollywagon
07-24-2006, 11:12 AM
Ooh, didn't know I wasn't supposed to!

It doesn't matter, if he picks on me I can switch him off:tongue

Fancy sharing some of that popcorn?

reph
07-24-2006, 11:33 AM
If she picks on you, you can switch her off. I should have chosen a screen name like Marietta or LaVerne or something.

Present: lend
Past: lent

Present: loan
Past: loaned

poetinahat
07-24-2006, 11:39 AM
Ooh, didn't know I wasn't supposed to!

It doesn't matter, if he picks on me I can switch him off:tongue

Fancy sharing some of that popcorn?
Sure, be my guest!

Not that you're not supposed to question... but reph's known as the top gun grammarian around these parts. It reminded me of the Jim Croce song:

You don't tug on Superman's cape
You don't spit into the wind
You don't pull the mask off the ol' Lone Ranger
And you don't mess around with Jim...

Dollywagon
07-24-2006, 11:48 AM
Yep, you should've gone with Florence at the very least:D

Blast, 'lent' still sounds like a religious holiday to me.

Anyway, you are attacking an unarmed women - I lost my books, remember:tongue

newmod
07-24-2006, 02:02 PM
Hi all just to put this forward for me a homophone has the same sound but different spellings (e.g. would/wood) and a homonym same sound, same spelling (e.g. bear as an animal and bear as in carry). But then I have to do this stuff in class from time to time so I could be in the minority. A lot of pepole use them synonomously.

reph is correct about loan/loaned and lend/lent (well for me at least).

As for spelt, learnt, burnt etc. Im from London and when I write these verbs I write them that way. When I speak (shame on me :cry: ) I sometimes use the -ed ending. I blame 6 years with a Canadian girlfriend and 18 months living in Canada :D

alleycat
07-24-2006, 03:19 PM
If she picks on you, you can switch her off. I should have chosen a screen name like Marietta or LaVerne or something.

Bambi isn't taken.

;-)

Bufty
07-24-2006, 05:09 PM
Hi Newmod.

Pepole - I like it! That's a homophone, I guess. Wow, learning all the time here. :snoopy:


Hi all just to put this forward for me a homophone has the same sound but different spellings (e.g. would/wood) and a homonym same sound, same spelling (e.g. bear as an animal and bear as in carry). But then I have to do this stuff in class from time to time so I could be in the minority. A lot of pepole use them synonomously.

Dollywagon
07-24-2006, 06:18 PM
I'm waiting for Reph to morph into 'Bambi':tongue

I never noticed before that you were in Scotland, Bufty...snap!

maestrowork
07-24-2006, 06:57 PM
I've seen Reph. Yeah, she looked exactly like Bambi.

reph
07-24-2006, 09:12 PM
...reph's known as the top gun grammarian around these parts.1. Don't be silly. There are others who know grammar.

2. "Top gun"? How feminine an image is that?

I've seen Reph. Yeah, she looked exactly like Bambi.Liar, liar, pants (if any) on fire!

newmod
07-24-2006, 10:35 PM
Hi Bufty, yes unfortunately my typing (and many other skills) need a lot of improvement :Shrug:

Bufty
07-25-2006, 02:02 AM
Nah! Welcome to the club. ;)


Hi Bufty, yes unfortunately my typing (and many other skills) need a lot of improvement :Shrug:

aruna
07-25-2006, 04:32 PM
Sure, be my guest!

Not that you're not supposed to question... but reph's known as the top gun grammarian around these parts. It reminded me of the Jim Croce song:

You don't tug on Superman's cape
You don't spit into the wind
You don't pull the mask off the ol' Lone Ranger
And you don't mess around with Jim...

I first became of Reph when I was just a lurker, reading Uncle Jim's writing thread. She objected to something he'd said regarding grammar - so strongly, in fact, that she started her own thread. It was like two Tsunamis meeting in midair - a powerful experience for the silent observer. Since then I have always kept tight lips in Reph's presence - except of course when it comes to God-threads!;)

rekirts
07-25-2006, 06:53 PM
Is there a difference in meaning between lend and loan when loan is used as a verb? I looked them up and I still can't tell. If there is a difference it seems to be very subtle.

aruna
07-25-2006, 07:10 PM
Is there a difference in meaning between lend and loan when loan is used as a verb? I looked them up and I still can't tell. If there is a difference it seems to be very subtle.

Also note that loan is not used in British English at all, except as a noun (and then rarely).

poetinahat
07-25-2006, 07:42 PM
1. Don't be silly. There are others who know grammar.

2. "Top gun"? How feminine an image is that?
1. But you're the figure of authority. And silly? Me? As if.
"Some people say I'm crazy; they just give me a pain. Please pass the ketchup, I think it's going to rain!"

2. How 'bout Annie Oakley?

dclary
07-25-2006, 08:22 PM
Present: lend
Past: lent

Doh! I would'a dog-gone done and knowed this, but I gone and lended them grammartician books to my neighbor Bartleby.

:e2stooges

reph
07-25-2006, 08:26 PM
Reph...objected to something he'd said regarding grammar - so strongly, in fact, that she started her own thread. It was like two Tsunamis meeting in midair - a powerful experience for the silent observer.Ah, yes, the great "and then" war. I didn't want to keep arguing with UJ in his thread, but I wasn't conceding the argument, either. If I'm so forceful as to inspire a tsunami comparison, that's a trait I didn't know about. You'd think I ought to be able to use it to get more of what I want in the real world.


Is there a difference in meaning between lend and loan when loan is used as a verb?In school, we were taught that "loan" is used for money and "lend" for everything else.


1. But you're the figure of authority.Thanks for the tip. I'll be changing my user title again soon to reflect that.

Soccer Mom
07-26-2006, 02:58 AM
Friends, Romans, Countrymen, loan me your ear! ;)

Neither a borrower nor a loaner be.


Stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood,
Disguise fair nature with hard-favored rage;
Then loan the eye a terrible aspect.

Nah, doesn't have the same ring to it.