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IThinkICan29
07-17-2006, 04:54 PM
Ok, this may be the world's craziest (dumbest) question but...eh...I'm crazy so who cares. When it comes to "in", "into", and "in to" (not sure if it's possible), what is the general rule? Please feel free to throw in some examples or dos and don'ts.

Thanks!

IThinkICan29
07-17-2006, 06:22 PM
Now I'm officially embarrassed and feeling like a complete jack-A (20 views, 0 responses). Please be gentle.

Soccer Mom
07-17-2006, 06:27 PM
Don't be embarassed. If we don't answer it means we don't know or can't formulate a good explanation. This post might do better in the Grammar for Grasshoppers. (I'd post a link, but I'm not computer savy enough to do that!) It's in The Conference Room.

Oh, and welcome to AW.

IThinkICan29
07-17-2006, 06:55 PM
Thanks! I didn't think to check there.

brianm
07-17-2006, 07:00 PM
It's a movement word that doesn't get split.

"I went into the house."
"I'm in the house."

"I broke it into five pieces."
"It is in five pieces."

maestrowork
07-17-2006, 07:10 PM
This is a good question for the Grammar forum. ;)

emeraldcite
07-17-2006, 07:11 PM
I'll move this down to grammar for our gurus!

reph
07-17-2006, 09:05 PM
Moving a chair in the dining room is different from moving a chair into the dining room. "Into" denotes entry, whether literal or figurative, but "in" is often used with the same meaning without shocking most readers. "The mayor got into trouble when he parked in a red zone" is correct; "got in trouble" is common.

newmod
07-17-2006, 09:17 PM
Here´s another of those little gems and as usual it depends on context. In is generally about position, as reph said, WHERE they are (IN the dining room) and into is about destination or direction (move the chair INTO the dining room), or WHERE THEY ARE GOING, as reph said, movement.

But we need to be careful. Some verbs (e.g. throw, jump, push) can take both in and into in a directional sense. General guide is we use into when we think of the movement itself and in when we think of where the thing will end up. E.g. "Put this into a jar" or "Put this in the fridge"

Hope that has caused more confusion than before :)

Jamesaritchie
07-17-2006, 09:49 PM
Ok, this may be the world's craziest (dumbest) question but...eh...I'm crazy so who cares. When it comes to "in", "into", and "in to" (not sure if it's possible), what is the general rule? Please feel free to throw in some examples or dos and don'ts.

Thanks!

Think of it this way:

He turned his gun in to the police officer.
He turned his gun into the police officer.

See the difference?

This may explain the actual rule.

Into is a preposition. In a sentence, the preposition
into will be part of a prepositional phrase consisting of
into + its object + any modifiers of its objects. The entire phrase it is a part of will function adverbially to modify the
verb or verb phrase that precedes the phrase.

In the phrase in to, in is an adverb, directly modifying a verb, and to is a preposition with its own object. When the word into is used in a sentence where in to is meant, the resulting statement can be absurd.

IThinkICan29
07-17-2006, 11:19 PM
Ok, James those first two sample sentences were really helpful. As I read further....I heard the teacher from Charlie Brown....wah wah wah wah wah wah...in to preposition....wah wah wah.....LOL

Man oh man, I don't know what I'd do without you guys...

Jamesaritchie
07-17-2006, 11:53 PM
.I heard the teacher from Charlie Brown....wah wah wah wah wah wah...in to preposition....wah wah wah.....LOL



I sound just like that in real life.