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Dennis E. Taylor
06-29-2019, 01:02 AM
I have a society where the young and new adults often leave their birth home in small groups, to travel, explore, and ultimately settle down somewhere else. I've been beating my head against a wall, but all I can come up with is 'sabbatical' which is obviously wrong. The society doesn't speak English, so I can claim 'poor translation', but I want to have some English description that has the right flavor. Anything come immediately to mind?

Patty
06-29-2019, 01:35 AM
When animals do this it is called dispersing.

ap123
06-29-2019, 01:38 AM
The Amish tradition of rumspringa (sp?) comes to mind. Maybe some variation, call it the springing or something.

frimble3
06-29-2019, 04:41 AM
There's the Australian Aboriginal 'walkabout', perhaps.
Or, way back in the days of guilds and apprentices 'journeyman' meant someone who was finished their apprenticeship, and went on the road to find work and learn things from other masters. Still in use in the construction trades. Maybe it could be adapted?

Tazlima
06-29-2019, 06:29 AM
It can also be named after the typical amount of time spent on the journey before settling down (like students taking a "gap year.")

neandermagnon
06-29-2019, 11:02 AM
I was going to say gap year but someone beat me to it - so I'm seconding that suggestion. I also like walkabout albeit that sounds a bit too specifically Australian to me. But you could adapt it slightly to avoid it being tied too strongly to a geographical location.

Also, maybe some other word that doesn't usually mean that specifically, but it would be clear from the context that's how the words being used, e.g. exploring (as a noun/gerund - e.g. "he's gone on his exploring") or something like that. There are probably loads of words that could be co-opted in this way.

mccardey
06-29-2019, 11:09 AM
There's the Australian Aboriginal 'walkabout', perhaps. I'd avoid this. There's a lot of cultural importance and colonialist baggage attached to it. It also doesn't quite serve OP's purpose.

I really like Neandermagnon's idea -
Also, maybe some other word that doesn't usually mean that specifically, but it would be clear from the context that's how the words being used, e.g. exploring (as a noun/gerund - e.g. "he's gone on his exploring") or something like that. There are probably loads of words that could be co-opted in this way.

DrDoc
06-29-2019, 11:41 AM
"onward migration" as an English translation may work for those who watch it happen (the older folks): "The onward migration of the young folk is an old tradition of our tribe." While those who have not left yet could call it "pioneering". "Next year is when I'll go pioneering with my friends, as my parents did before me".

This is a good problem, so be sure to treat it as such.

Regards,
DrDoc