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Yeshanu
05-19-2006, 10:53 PM
While I'm starting threads about books, I thought I'd start the discussion on the Harry Potter books in this forum.

My question:

Which of the books do you like best so far, and why?


My answer:

I'll have to say Prisoner of Azkaban, because of the way she disguised and then revealed Wormtail. It was the kind of thing you don't see coming, but when it does happen, it totally fits the novel.

It was also the point at which I realized that she'd planned the overall plot arc of the books in advance, and it wasn't going to be like a series, with what happens in each book having nothing more in common with past books than continuity of character and conflict.

Plus, the first three were generally better edited, with not a whole lot of things going on that were extraneous to the story.

CaroGirl
07-06-2006, 12:22 AM
I liked them all. They all had something special in them that was endearing. However, the one I liked least was The Order of the Phoenix. I thought it was too long and would have benefited from a darn good edit.

mkcbunny
07-08-2006, 10:19 PM
What she said.

Favorite is probably Goblet of Fire. Although, when I re-read them all before the last book came out, I really appreciated PoA. I think it's got as much story as OotP, but it's half as long. Much tighter book.

Soccer Mom
07-09-2006, 08:05 AM
Ditto on OotP. I loved Goblet of Fire. The action really had me. HbP is my second fave. Can't wait for the next. I love the way Rowling sets a scene. In just a few words, I can picture the location. What a gift.

Forbidden Snowflake
07-09-2006, 03:42 PM
Ok, for me it's:

3, 4, 6, 1, 5, 2.

The third one is just awesome. Sirius first of all. The way she showed Wormetail. The time thing. Just everything about this book I loved so much.

The fourth was full of action, the tournament, the three schools, I loved it.

Then the sixth, well, I was afraid, it'd be not good but I actually quite enjoyed it. Even the end, because I just refuse not to trust Snape.

The first one is kind of slow at the beginning. It's the one that was told mostly for small children, where the others start being for older ones. But it's a fun read and entertaining.

The fifth one was not good. Too much talking, nothing happening, nothing going on. Umbrigde made me want to throw the book away.

The second one is weak. It has good elements but it's the only book I never managed to read more than once.

mkcbunny
07-11-2006, 09:45 AM
Ok, for me it's ...
Other than the order, my thoughts exactly. I'd swap 3/4 and 5/2, but I liked and disliked those same things. Umbridge made me want to scream, above all. That said, I think #5 will translate well to film, especially the end at the MoM.

Inkdaub
07-12-2006, 01:11 PM
I haven't read the Half Blood Prince yet and I'm feeling the itch.

mkcbunny
07-13-2006, 09:43 AM
I haven't read the Half Blood Prince yet and I'm feeling the itch.
Well, get to it! :)

Inkdaub
07-13-2006, 03:32 PM
Yeah, I'm waiting for the paperback edition. Comes out on the 25th I think.

Manxom Vroom
07-13-2006, 04:42 PM
I like Azkaban the best, following by Half-Blood Prince. My only complaint about HPB was that when I imagine the characters, I now see the actors from the movies rather than my own idea of what they look like. For a while I was seriously bummed because I couldn't remember how I imagined Snape - I just kept seeing Alan Rickman.

And for me, Goblet of Fire was WAY TOO LONG. I thought they were never going to get out of the Quidditch World Cup! However, I thought the movie version of Goblet was the best of the four movies.

mkcbunny
07-14-2006, 09:45 AM
I find that for a few characters I do think of the movie actors, but for most I keep my original impression. Dumbledore, for example, remains an enigmatic person in my mind—partly because I haven't a lock on him, and partly because the actor has [necessarily] changed. On the other hand, I now hear Alan Rickman in my head when I read Snape, and I don't think that's a bad thing. Likewise, my vision of Ron and the actor are close enough that they exist fairly well together.

Soccer Mom
07-15-2006, 12:27 AM
Yeah, Alan Rickman has hijacked my image of Snape. I agree. Not a bad thing.

jbal
07-15-2006, 03:03 AM
Yeah, Alan Rickman has hijacked my image of Snape. I agree. Not a bad thing.
this is off the subject, but Alan Rickman has one of the coolest voices in the movie business.

Yeshanu
07-15-2006, 07:35 AM
I really didn't like the fourth movie as well as the others because of Dumbledore. My image of Dumbledore was much more like the first actor who played him, and I would have been happier if they'd had someone like Ian MacKellan play him in the remaining movies.

Soccer Mom
07-15-2006, 04:55 PM
this is off the subject, but Alan Rickman has one of the coolest voices in the movie business.

I have to agree. I confess I hadn't heard of him before the Potter series. Now he voices other characters in my head in other book series. (should I be admitting voices in the head here?)

ChunkyC
07-22-2006, 03:24 AM
I too think The Order of the Phoenix was too long. I was glad to see that The Half Blood Prince was significantly shorter. Overall, I love the books. I began ordering them in the adult edition hardcover (http://www.raincoast.com/harrypotter/harrypotterbooks.html) from Raincoast Books up here in Canada with The Order of the Phoenix. They are extraordinarily beautiful, dont'cha think? I can't wait to get the first four and have the complete set when #7 comes out. I'll probably donate my other copies of the first four if I can find a place on the planet that doesn't have them.

Someone mentioned how the first books were much easier reads. I think this is a sign of just how clever Rowling is. She's 'growing up' the books along with her audience. The kids who were ten and eleven when the first book was published in 1997 are adults now. It's hard to believe it has been that long, it feels like yesterday when I first heard about this Harry Potter kid.

Soccer Mom
07-22-2006, 06:30 AM
Someone mentioned how the first books were much easier reads. I think this is a sign of just how clever Rowling is. She's 'growing up' the books along with her audience. The kids who were ten and eleven when the first book was published in 1997 are adults now. It's hard to believe it has been that long, it feels like yesterday when I first heard about this Harry Potter kid.
[/QUOTE]

I agree. It really is clever. My eight year old has just discovered Harry Potter. He loves the first two books, but Pris. of Azk. loses him. He will grow into them.

The books are absolutely gorgeous. I was a reluctant convert. I don't read fantasy much. I bought the first books for my son (when she was on book four) and now I'm the addict. My five year old likes them too. Harry is just so accessible as a character. How could you not root for him?

scully931
07-22-2006, 06:58 AM
Hi! Goblet of Fire is my VERY favorite as well. I liked it best because it wasn't too dark, still took place mostly at Hogwarts, had the Quidditch World Cup instead of regular Quidditch (I was a bit weary of the play by plays), but yet had new and interesting characters. Also, and probably one of the biggest things for me, it was the last book that was pure. (Without the movie characters trying to interrupt my thoughts!) :rant: I would have loved it if the movies came out after the books were completed.

My least favorite was HBP. I felt like some of the writing with the romance stuff bordered on fanfiction. Not to say I didn't like it at all, just my least favorite.

Also, I discovered the books really early on. In fact, when I bought it I had only glanced at the cover and though the author's name was Harry Potter. haha. Once everyone was reading them, I don't know... didn't seem as special to me anymore. I'm very glad I got to it early on because if tons of people recommended it to me, I would have totally ignored it and what a waste that would have been!

By the way, glad to see a nice positive thread about JKR. Get so tired of reading articles by "writers" who say she's not any good.

~Deborah :Sun:

maestrowork
07-27-2006, 02:23 PM
Rowling has been writing this series for 20 years. She knew what she was doing. She planned 7 books, one of each year, and she wanted her readers to grow up with these books, and not a new batch of readers every year. I have a feeling she writes each book for kids the same age as Harry in mind (including her own).

However, part of it is also that she's grown as a writer since the first book as well -- her plotting is so much more sophisticated now, and her characters more complex. I am not completely convinced that she planned all that from the get-go. But simpler characters/plot did make the first book a much easier (and more juvenile) read.

Soccer Mom
07-31-2006, 08:14 PM
I admit that I love the opening of of 5, but the book needed a good, hard edit IMHO. I would rank mine 4, 6, 2, 1, 3, 5.

I guess that is why they make chocolate and vanilla. When is book 7 due?

Sailor Kenshin
07-31-2006, 10:29 PM
I love all the books. All are quite different and grow in complexity as Harry himself grows.

The movies, however---another story. I liked the first one best. And I can't stand the new Dumbledore.

ChunkyC
08-01-2006, 02:57 AM
When is book 7 due?
No due date yet, but she did say on her site (http://www.jkrowling.com/) a while ago she was in the middle of writing it right now.

Ooo, she's in New York tomorrow and Wednesday doing a reading with Stephen King and John Irving. Man, would I like to attend that.

maestrowork
08-01-2006, 04:30 AM
I can just imagine the lines... Are they doing that at Madison Square Garden?

katiemac
08-01-2006, 04:53 AM
No due date yet

Next summer. Suposedly 7/7/07. But I'd like to see it on July 31st. Unless Harry dies, then that would just be a bummer.

6,4,3,5,1,2. :) Although I like 2 much better after reading 6, and is closing in on 1. The other four are MUCH harder to order.

Soccer Mom
08-01-2006, 05:22 PM
Another whole year. I'll just have to stay busy. July 31--That would be cool. I don't think she could kill Harry off. Teenage girls everywhere would fling themselves off bridges.

thepianist2008
08-01-2006, 07:19 PM
For me, the sixth book has to be the best. It's because I wanted to cry when Dumbledore died. My cousin cried, too. I think that the fact that she wrote well enought to have that much control over my emotions was astounding, and I think that whenever you see that happening with a writer, then you have found a special one. Plus, I love treasure hunts. That whole search for the, oh gosh, haven't read it in 9 months, umm, sorry but my minds a blank. That thing that Voldemort put a part of his soul into, like the diary from book two. I think she did really well with her planning. I think that, except for three and five, in my opinion, that as the books progress we can watch her grow as a writer.

For me, the order is 6,2,4,1,5,3

ChunkyC
08-01-2006, 07:26 PM
I can just imagine the lines... Are they doing that at Madison Square Garden?
Radio City. And they're selling tickets via Ticketmaster. They're calling it, "An Evening with Harry, Carrie and Garp." Some more details here (http://www.stephenking.com/hcg/). I wish I'd spotted this sooner, we could have put it on the calendar.

So ... next July, eh? Can you imagine the pressure she must be feeling to deliver that manuscript on time?

Soccer Mom
08-06-2006, 08:05 AM
She had better deliver that ms on time. There will be a riot if she doesn't!

I suspect that one won't be a problem though. I heard an interview with her where she said she wrote the ending first and worked backwards. She had already roughed out the final scenes of book seven before she ever wrote book one.

kilamangiro
08-08-2006, 09:25 PM
I'm a huge Harry Potter fan. I'll probably get shot down for saying this but I really believe they are some the best books i've ever read. Azkaban is my favourite, then Goblet of Fire, HBP, philosopher's stone, order of phoenix, chamber of secrets.

Severus Snape, Heathcliff and Shylock are my favourite characters from literature.

Soccer Mom
08-09-2006, 06:49 PM
You won't get shot down here, Kilamangiro. I love JK Rowling. Some people don't care for anything that hits cult status. Me? I love me some Harry Potter! I just love the Weasleys.

For me, the true test is a book that makes me forget about writing. I don't notice the dialogue tags. I'm not aware of the plot arcs. I just read. These books do that for me.

Sailor Kenshin
08-09-2006, 07:06 PM
Me, too!

C.bronco
08-09-2006, 07:15 PM
Goblet of Fire is my favorite because it was the funniest, and I think they did a great job with the movie. I hear they're already filming HBP.

I have to admit, I wrote my book after reading book 5 and realizing the length of the wait I had until book six came out.

Bk_30
08-09-2006, 08:50 PM
LOL, I too love me some Harry Potter. I read the first books because a friend recommended the series to my son (he was 8) and I wanted to make sure of the content. I fell in love. Now my children and I race to see who can finish the books first when they come out. I don't have a favorite I do have a least favorite and that was HBP, only BECAUSE it made me cry.

As for the actors messing up my perception, it didnt' happen that way for me.
The actors and voices matched what I had built in my head already. Not exactly but close enough that instead of seeing the actors I see the characters(yeah i'm crazy what of it? lol) when I watch the movies. I was actually disapppointed in the last movie..for once it didn't match my imagination spot on.

July 07? for the next one...Geesh, but I can see the release date tying into her theme or at least parts of the theme that I see emerging.

ChunkyC
08-09-2006, 10:04 PM
For me, the true test is a book that makes me forget about writing. I don't notice the dialogue tags. I'm not aware of the plot arcs. I just read. These books do that for me.
That's it exactly. If you want, you can analyze her writing, but I too found that within a couple of pages of opening each one, I was off in her world and didn't come up for air until I finished. Only then did I think about her technique, if at all.

SherryTex
08-09-2006, 11:36 PM
I know I'll have to tear up my English Major card, but I have loved reading Harry Potter by myself and to my kids. My oldest son has grown up on them, and thus is far better read at 13 than I think I was at 21. My favorites are the twins and Professor Moody.

I do not however, think the movies do justice.

Thinks if she wants Epic, Harry and Voldemort both have to die, or Harry has to sacrifice himself. Think Ron and Hermione will get married, have a baby boy, and name him Harry. Think Snape was still teaching Harry when he ran out of Hogwarts.
--Muggle or Witch? I am a Squib.

Pisarz
08-11-2006, 06:17 PM
I'm a huge Harry Potter fan, too. I wanted to see what all the fuss was about in Summer '05 with HBP and so started reading the series. It became something of an addiction and like the rest of you, I eagerly await book 7.

I'm going to break from the pack and side with Jadezuki from many posts ago--I thought Order of the Phoenix was superb. When Sirius died at the end, the series was lifted to a whole new level of "wow, characters we've grown to care about are going to die, no more 11th hour saves." I can't wait to see how the final scenes are portrayed in the movies. (BTW, I'm a huge fan of Ralph Fiennes' work--thought he was a fabulous Voldemort).

I thought Snape was the most intriguing character of HPB. IMHO, Rowling is giving us a good ruse and Snape isn't the evil traitor we're led to think he is. What the rest of you think of Snape's role?

Sailor Kenshin
08-11-2006, 07:31 PM
I'm a huge Harry Potter fan, too. I wanted to see what all the fuss was about in Summer '05 with HBP and so started reading the series. It became something of an addiction and like the rest of you, I eagerly await book 7.

I'm going to break from the pack and side with Jadezuki from many posts ago--I thought Order of the Phoenix was superb. When Sirius died at the end, the series was lifted to a whole new level of "wow, characters we've grown to care about are going to die, no more 11th hour saves." I can't wait to see how the final scenes are portrayed in the movies. (BTW, I'm a huge fan of Ralph Fiennes' work--thought he was a fabulous Voldemort).

I thought Snape was the most intriguing character of HPB. IMHO, Rowling is giving us a good ruse and Snape isn't the evil traitor we're led to think he is. What the rest of you think of Snape's role?

This is how I think the end will go, because that's how the Hero's Journey has to end.

Harry will face You-Know-Who alone.

But first, he will have lost Ron and Hermione.

And Snape. How, I am not certain, but I think Harry will battle Snape, and either Snape will sacrifice himself for Harry, or Harry will put an end to Snape---only to learn that Snape was on his side after all.

Somewhere along the way, Draco will intervene on Harry's behalf. Whether he lives through it or not---well, it's JK's book, not mine.

And then Harry will "die." Literally? Metaphorically? We shall see. He dies in a cave and is reborn. Again, how, is up to the author.

Soccer Mom
08-11-2006, 08:34 PM
Snape is most assuredly not a traitor and Dumbledore is not dead. That is my two cents. And I think Ron will die. Draco will redeem himself.

ChunkyC
08-11-2006, 09:42 PM
The best thing about the Harry Potter phenomenon? Unlike so many Hollywood movies of the last thirty years or so, we can be positive this story won't end with Harry marching into Voldemort's lair strapped with bandoliers and raking everyone in sight with a pair of 50mm machine guns, then standing staring at the carnage as the smoke from the barrels wisps up past his face.

Thank you to J.K. Rowling for writing a story where we're approaching the final act and we still don't know how it's going to end.

Bk_30
08-11-2006, 10:15 PM
Hmmm I got to watch [I]An Evening with Harry, Carrie and Garp[I] yesterday. Soccor Mom, I have some bad news :(, but I did put a link up on my blog.
http://justasmalltowngirl1.spaces.live.com

Soccer Mom
08-11-2006, 10:41 PM
Oh no. Nonononono! I cry everytime I read Charlotte's web. Even though I know how it ends, I cry. I'm going to cry, aren't I? I can't play the link from my work computer. I'll link to your blog tonight.

Bufty
08-11-2006, 10:54 PM
Agreed.

And keep in mind the ending - or at least the Final Chapter- has already been written and kept under lock and key for years, so presumably there's some sort of 'circle' solution, linking the end to the beginning somehow, and where the ending was known by JKR even though she perhaps didn't know 'ALL' the characters at the time she wrote the ending. Just a thought. Maybe a confusing one, but still...


The best thing about the Harry Potter phenomenon? Unlike so many Hollywood movies of the last thirty years or so, we can be positive this story won't end with Harry marching into Voldemort's lair strapped with bandoliers and raking everyone in sight with a pair of 50mm machine guns, then standing staring at the carnage as the smoke from the barrels wisps up past his face.

Thank you to J.K. Rowling for writing a story where we're approaching the final act and we still don't know how it's going to end.

Linda Adams
08-12-2006, 06:12 AM
For me, I liked the 4th book best. It had a lot of action in, and what happens near the end shows how dangerous Voldemort is. I do, however, agree it could have been edited down some.

The one I liked the least was Half-Blood Prince. It gave me the impression it was a middle book. You know, the second book in a trilogy where not a lot happens but it has to fill the page space. It's the only book out of the entire series that I have not reread because once was more than enough.

Sailor Kenshin
08-12-2006, 06:24 AM
I haven't reread that one yet either. And I've read all the others at least twice.

Southern_girl29
08-19-2006, 08:32 AM
I love Harry Potter. Anything that gets kids and their parents reading together is a wonderful thing. I can't really pick a favorite. There is something I like in all of them, even OotP. I actually liked Umbridge (just because I hated her so much; I think she was a great character). I cried at the end of HBP, and for several days after, I felt a sadness like a member of my family had died. Not many books have affected me that way.

If I had to pick an ending for the series, I don't think Harry will die. If he dies, even if Voldemort dies along with him, to me, it shows that evil has won. I just don't see Rowling doing that. I think Ginny Weasley will be the one dies in it. I agree with a previous poster who said that Hermione and Ron will marry or at least wind up even more together than they were at the end of HBP.

And, I'm not sure about Dumbledore and Snape. Part of me wants to hope that Snape is good, and Dumbledore is not dead. But, I think Rowling has set up so Harry will have to face Voldemort alone, and Dumbledore would always be there to help him as long as he was alive.

How many years do you think the last book will cover? All of the others have just covered one school year. I'm wondering if the last one will be the same?

ChunkyC
08-22-2006, 09:10 PM
I'm sure it will cover their seventh year at Hogwarts. That's been the pattern all along: seven years to graduate from school, so seven books.


Hmmm I got to watch An Evening with Harry, Carrie and Garp yesterday. Soccor Mom, I have some bad news
I watched the MSN video of Harry, Carrie and Garp as well (thanks for the link, bk30), and was really shocked when JKR let that particular cat out of the bag. The expression on the face of the person who posed the question was priceless. Then again, I probably looked exactly the same.

dragonjax
08-22-2006, 10:09 PM
My favorite is the fourth, GOBLET. That's when the writing started taking a truly dark bent that she'd previously hinted at in books 2 and 3. With 4, boom, suddenly middle grade grows up into YA (in my humble opinion).

(I also thought the movie version would have been impossible to follow if you didn't read the book.)

Least favorite? A toss-up between 1 and 5. STONE was very much "ooh, cool: magic!" and PHOENIX was l-o-o-o-o-ong. I didn't dislike these, but they were my least favorite(s).

Southern_girl29
08-22-2006, 11:56 PM
I'm sure it will cover their seventh year at Hogwarts. That's been the pattern all along: seven years to graduate from school, so seven books.


I watched the MSN video of Harry, Carrie and Garp as well (thanks for the link, bk30), and was really shocked when JKR let that particular cat out of the bag. The expression on the face of the person who posed the question was priceless. Then again, I probably looked exactly the same.

Could someone PM me and tell me what she let slip? I looked at the link and couldn't find it. Thanks.

larrypotter
09-01-2006, 02:31 AM
I love Harry Potter. Anything that gets kids and their parents reading together is a wonderful thing. I can't really pick a favorite. There is something I like in all of them, even OotP. I actually liked Umbridge (just because I hated her so much; I think she was a great character). I cried at the end of HBP, and for several days after, I felt a sadness like a member of my family had died. Not many books have affected me that way.
Ditto, Southerngirl. The ending was so powerful... I still feel like I lost a family member. Unfortunately, JKR has confirmed in interviews that, once dead, her characters do not return. I can't wait for the release of Book 7 -- but at the same time, I don't want it to come out... I just don't want the series to end!


How many years do you think the last book will cover? All of the others have just covered one school year. I'm wondering if the last one will be the same?
I believe the book will cover one school year. However, it won't be set all at Hogwarts, as Harry, Hermione, and Ron will not be attending school next year, because they will be horcrux-hunting, and then destroying Voldemort. I have a million and one theories about the seventh book, but I better go do something more productive right now!

Rolling Thunder
09-01-2006, 02:58 AM
I have to say PoA was by far the best followed by HBP. Even though many feel Dumbledore will somehow come back to life JK has flatly stated he is dead, dead, dead, dead, dead. Which sucks but I'm sure he'll be hanging around in a portrait ready to help when needed.

For some good reading:
http://www.hp-lexicon.org/about/sources/site_sources.html#TLC

Oh, and Soccermom? Rent a copy of the first 'Diehard' movie and you'll recognize Bruce Willis's antagonist, even with your eyes closed.

RT

Christine N.
09-01-2006, 04:16 AM
Agreed.

And keep in mind the ending - or at least the Final Chapter- has already been written and kept under lock and key for years, so presumably there's some sort of 'circle' solution, linking the end to the beginning somehow, and where the ending was known by JKR even though she perhaps didn't know 'ALL' the characters at the time she wrote the ending. Just a thought. Maybe a confusing one, but still...

OOP movie will be out mid-July next year, also when the last book is supposedly to be released. She's probably submitting chapters as she writes them and the editors are swarming to get it done.

I don't mean this to sound like "oooh, I'm like her!" but I can kind of relate to the last chapter thing. I know what the plot of the last book of my series is going to be, and I've only written two. I knew what it would be by the time I finished the first one. I think it helps, to have a goal. I'm not positive how the end of the end will play out, but I know quite a lot.

I haven't written any of it yet, not like she did with her last chapter. I've only taken notes about it. But some people wonder how she can possibly know how it will end at the beginning, but I understand it.

Favorites? Goblet of Fire, then PoA, then HBP. I didn't get that feeling that it was a middle book, but definitely and end. I could feel her kind of closing up shop - Fortescue being arrested, Ollivander disappearing. Diagon Alley (and it took me forever to get THAT joke) like a ghost town. It's like she was putting away all the toys. Sad.

Pisarz
09-01-2006, 05:56 PM
Has anyone heard what J.K. Rowling's post-HP plans are? Is she planning on creating a new series or will she pull a Seinfeld and go out on top?

For anyone who would like to read a very interesting analysis of Snape (and why he's not the traitor we're led to believe), check out the case made here: http://whysnape.tripod.com/ Go to What's New/Archives and look for an essay (you may have to poke around, but it's there) from August 13, 2005 titled "More HPB Analysis." It's a well-reasoned arugment that definitely provides food for thought and that will no doubt make you salivate for Book 7.

Soccer Mom
09-01-2006, 06:32 PM
Thanks for the link. I'm already salivating! She has said she plans a new series. I don't know any more than that. I would like her to continue to write in her created universe. Here's hoping.

BTW--I don't believe Snape is a traitor.

Christine N.
09-01-2006, 06:42 PM
I never believed Snape to be a traitor. Not once. Snape is torn in two - his hatred for James vs. his love for Lily. Cause you KNOW he was in love with her, and hated she married his tormentor. When Voldy killed Lily, that was the end for him being a Death Eater. He could never side with the one who killed his only love.

So when he sees Harry, one part of him wants to punish, the othe wants to protect.

It will be interesting to see which side wins, but I believe good will win out with him. I think Snape is the most complex character in the entire series.

triceretops
09-01-2006, 06:47 PM
Has anyone heard what J.K. Rowling's post-HP plans are? Is she planning on creating a new series or will she pull a Seinfeld and go out on top?

She is half way through a short children's book (illustrated, I believe), and wants to write it under a pen name. No more Harry Potter books. She wants to go out on top and with a bang. Seven books was enough.

Tri

helene
09-02-2006, 01:31 AM
I heard something similar, that she is indeed working on a book. Supposedly, she wants to use a pen name so that she won't disappoint readers who loved harry potter who may/may not like her new works.

Aubrey
09-02-2006, 11:32 PM
Anyone else wish she'd write a book or (better) a mini-series about MWPP? I'd love to know where this rivalry with Snape came from, what turned Worntail to the dark side, and how James the jerk managed to eventually snag Lily. I know she has to be sick to death of HP and I sincerely doubt she'd write more in that universe, but I can wish.

I liked Goblet of Fire best, despite its flaws, since it was so dark. I mean a guy sawed off a limb, a classmate got killed and Harry got tortured! It was very intense.

The last book I hated a lot of. There didn't seem to be much plot through most of it and instead had too much romance, which I didn't find to be very well done, to be honest. And I couldn't have happily lived the rest of my life not knowing Harry has wet dreams about Ginny. That was just gross! I did enjoy the action plotline though. Especially with Snape. I felt awful for him through the whole book.

Christine N.
09-04-2006, 12:25 AM
We know what turned Wormtail. He was the Potter's secret keeper, and he's a spineless twit. Voldy threatened to kill him if he didn't give up the Potters, and he folded like deck of cards. After doing that he had nowhere to go so he stayed with the Death Eaters.

The Snape think I'm sure developed from a mixture of James, Sirius et al, picking on him contstantly AND the fact James married Lily, who I'm almost positive Snape was in love with b/c she was nice to him. She was really gifted at potions too, which I'm sure is not lost on Snape.

But I would like to know about James and Lily's relationship. I think that'd make a fine story.

Soccer Mom
09-04-2006, 03:00 AM
I would love for her to do a prequel and take her back to the days when James and Lily and Severus et al were Hogwarts students. And what is Aunt Petunia hiding? There is something more there.

Aubrey
09-04-2006, 05:03 AM
We know what turned Wormtail. He was the Potter's secret keeper, and he's a spineless twit. Voldy threatened to kill him if he didn't give up the Potters, and he folded like deck of cards. After doing that he had nowhere to go so he stayed with the Death Eaters.
I always wondered if he was a DE all along though, even through school. If so, I want to know how he drifted into that group. I want to see him slowly changing, mentally, and trying to hide it from his friends. Mostly I just want to have a chance to see him and the others more fleshed out.

Thank God for fanfic. There are so many pieces of information we'll never learn in canon and can only speculate about.

TheGaffer
09-15-2006, 11:25 PM
And what is Aunt Petunia hiding? There is something more there.
We'll find out. That's something I can't help but think she reveals eventually.

ChunkyC
09-16-2006, 12:19 AM
I seem to recall hearing/reading something about Aunt Petunia's secrets being revealed in the final book, along with a whole whack of loose ends. I just wonder if she'll leave anything unanswered, because if she does, you know the whole planet is going to go bonkers speculating about whether she's secretly planning more Harry Potter stories.

Shadow_Ferret
10-10-2006, 11:53 PM
I've only read the first book. Took me several years to read it. I started it something like 6 or 7 times and couldn't get out of the first chapter because I didn't care about Harry. I didn't care if he was living in a closet. JK Rowling could not make me like him enough in those first few pages to get me to read any further.

But I finally forced myself to finish it only because I was using magic in my current WIP and I wanted to see how she handled magic. I will admit to having enjoyed the story and I did come to care (a little) about Harry. I grudgingly admire Rowling's story telling ability and her imagination.

But that said, I still have no read interest in reading any more of her books. I see what she did with magic and it was nothing like what I was doing, which is what I wanted to confirm.

Stacia Kane
10-11-2006, 03:15 AM
I liked Goblet of Fire best, despite its flaws, since it was so dark. I mean a guy sawed off a limb, a classmate got killed and Harry got tortured! It was very intense.


Me too! For me that was where the series stopped being, "Eh, cute children's books but what's the big deal?" and became, OMGs I need the next one!




The last book I hated a lot of. There didn't seem to be much plot through most of it and instead had too much romance, which I didn't find to be very well done, to be honest. And I couldn't have happily lived the rest of my life not knowing Harry has wet dreams about Ginny. That was just gross!

Where was that? I must have missed it, because I just finished rereading the book today and don't remember any mention of wet dreams!

Personally, I've been rooting for Harry and Ginny since COS, so I was thrilled with the romance, and it felt real--they're sixteen-year-olds, this is what they really care about.

I didn't hate the last one. I liked it, and it had some amazing moments, but it wasn't my favorite. I think it and #1 are my least faves, simply because the writing in #1 wasn't anywhere near as good as it is now.


I do think Hogwarts will be featured in the next book though, at least a little. There will be some reason why Harry needs to go back there. We can't have the last book not feature the school, and I still think the school is really important to Voldemort so the final showdown may take place there.


I'm on the fence about Snape. I don't really believe he's a traitor--and to be honest, I'll feel pretty gypped if he turns out to be. But it's hard to believe he's all good, either. We'll just have to see...can't wait!

Pisarz
10-11-2006, 05:59 PM
I like Christine N.'s theory about Snape holding the torch for Lily--I'll bet there's something to that idea. It would explain the love/hate relationship he has with Harry.

Remember the secret talk between Dumbledore and Snape? (Book 7, I think). We never found out about that, either, and what promise Snape made during that conversation.

army_grunt13
11-06-2006, 05:53 AM
The real magic of Harry Potter is that it is all-encompassing in terms of age and types of readers. An entire generation of children has been accelerated to literacy, simply because they want to be able to read Harry Potter! Seriously, how many books are there in existence, with the sheer length of the HP series (some 7-800 pages) that the average eight-year old picks up and reads. Not only that, but adults, with and without children, love Harry Potter. I myself am single, no kids, and a self-proclaimed literrary conosuer (even though I probably can't spell either word right) and yet I love Harry Potter. I can't tell you how many adults I know that are HP fans, that don't even have kids.

On plot notes, every time Dumbledore's death gets discussed, I keep hearing voices from Monte Python and the Holy Grail (the scene where Lancelot storms the castle). Quote: "He's not quite dead!" "He's getting better!"

I agree, I don't think Snape is actually a bad guy, at least I hope he's not, since he's my favorite character (besides the Weasley twins). I too think Draco may somehow redeem himself, though it wouldn't surprise me either way. I keep thinking Hagrid is going to die at some point, but that would be too obvious, which is something Ms Rowling does her best to avoid. By the way, anybody know when the final book is coming out?

Soccer Mom
11-06-2006, 07:24 PM
July 7, 2007

daoine
11-15-2006, 07:24 AM
I have such a soft spot for JKR. My favourite is also POA because, after all the magic and getting to grips with this strange wizarding world in the first two books, this one takes the slightly "normal" tack of family tragedy: I was shouting for joy when Harry ended up with a godfather. No more Dursleys I naively thought. :-P

OOTP is my next fave because of all the action and intrigue and I love Tonks and Kingsley Shacklebolt. Neville becomes really interesting in this book and I liked that too. But I found the scene with Sirius and the veil really inconclusive and vague - I was flipping through the rest of the book to figure out if he was really dead or not and that spoilt the reading experience for me a bit. And the same with HBP: I kept thinking No Way! and racing through to find the point where it's "No worries, I was just pretending to be dead to throw the DE off the scent." I'll have to try and control myself with the last book. No skim reading! And believe Jo when she kills someone!

Oh, and edited to add: I love Snape. I'm convinced he's really good. And I love Alan Rickman. (Anyone remember Robin Hood Prince of Thieves? "I'll cut his heart out with a spoon." | "Why a spoon, cousin? Why not an axe?" | "Because it's dull, you twit. It'll hurt more.")

WishWords
11-22-2006, 06:20 PM
I liked the first one best. I was coerced into reading "that kids book" and was very emotional after the first chapter. It brought back memories of being a little girl and wishing every evening that when I woke up in the morning I'd be special in some way. I identified with Harry immediately even though the setting is mythical.

SMG
11-23-2006, 01:46 AM
As counter-productive as it may be, I don't read stories that much and so I've never read a Harry Potter book, probably won't ever; but I saw Goblet of Fire on HBO and was caught off guard. It was a great movie and some parts scared me. I didn't like the other Potter movies I saw, but this one really got me going. I was disappointed to read that the director of GOF isn't going to be handling the next film.

Linda Adams
11-23-2006, 02:33 AM
Goblet is my favorite, though I agree that it should have been edited more. It was the first one, I think, where we really started to see that danger was coming and that there would be a cost.

I did not like Phoenix on first read. I read it in one night, and frankly, it's a very angry book. It's not a problem when reading a few chapters, putting it down, and coming back to it later.

The one I liked the least? Half-Prince. It felt like a middle book in fantasy where the author doesn't have a storyline and has to fill to create the book.

Christine N.
12-22-2006, 03:39 AM
I'm psyched, but not all that crazy about the title. It doesn't grab me, nor does it inspire horror or fear.

Call me strange, I guess. Just seems like it doesn't have any 'umph'.

Of course I'll preorder it, and stand in the bookstore at midnight, and love it anyway. I hope.

Lisa Y
12-22-2006, 05:36 AM
I feel like the title came out of nowhere. Edited because I revealed the title!! But what the heck does DH mean? Now I feel like I have to comb through 1-6 and find that one little line I missed that will give this title some meaning for me! My only guess is that it's got something to do with that veil.

C.bronco
12-22-2006, 05:37 AM
Godrick's Hollow. My best HP buddy just emailed me. :)

Lisa Y
12-22-2006, 05:39 AM
But it's "Hallows"

Christine N.
12-22-2006, 05:40 AM
Yeah, not Hollows, but Hallows.

C.bronco
12-22-2006, 05:42 AM
Oooooh hollow. I'll have to use my brain now. Maybe tomorrow!

Christine N.
12-22-2006, 06:13 AM
Yeah, like Hallowed Ground, I guess.

I guess it'll grow on me. And of course Harry's parents died on Halloween. When else? LOL

Just once I'd like someone to be murdered on Flag Day. Or Bastille Day.

Lisa Y
12-22-2006, 03:18 PM
Or how about just plain old February 19 or August 5!

Now that I'm thinking about the title, I guess it could be fitting (such a compliment from me, who can't even string a sentence together picking on JK, who has created this wonderful world and is a multi millionaire because of it!). None of the titles had any meaning before we read the books. I guess I was hoping the title would give me a clue as to what was going to happen, as I have no idea how long I'm going to have to wait. I still have no clue, just more questions!

Christine N.
12-22-2006, 05:18 PM
Well, no, Lisa, you're right.

Sorcerer's Stone - we knew it was in there somewhere
Chamber of Secrets - the whole book we wondered where it was
Prisoner of Azkaban - we knew who he was almost instantly, but the twist came in his relationship to Harry
Goblet of Fire - same thing, it was a good title
Order of the Phoenix - we found out it was deeply tied to Harry's past, and the title gave at least a hint
Half-Blood Prince - well, at least we knew there was a person we were looking for, the mystery was in who he was

Deathly Hallows? meh.

Azure Skye
12-22-2006, 08:19 PM
I think I can still say Azkaban is my favorite. Of all the movies, I like this one as well. The fourth movie was just disappointing.

uina
12-23-2006, 07:06 PM
The fourth movie was very disapointing but i loved the fourth book.

Deadbeat 007
02-10-2007, 05:15 AM
I really, really didn't like the movies -- plus the kids are getting too old.

The books, however, are quite genius, especially with all the plot twists. Of all the books, I was disappointed most by Order of the Phoenix, but I think I would hardly call it a disappointment. I still ate through the book eagerly and reread it many times (I find it hard to read a good book once). My favorite was the Prisoner of Azkaban, followed by the Goblet of Fire.

As for the new title, I think it'll be fine as long as it ties in with the story as the others did... which I'm sure it will. I'm amazed that Rowling had the drive to make it this far without seriously disappointing me. That's my three cents, anyway.

blueskyscribe
02-17-2007, 12:27 PM
In the Arthurian legends, there were four hallows . . . the Grail, a broken sword, a spear dripping blood, and a platter. I think in HP it will tie in to the four "house" items that Voldemort was after.

Speaking of the different versions of the book, I just found the British versions of Goblet of Fire and Prisoner of Azkaban at Value Village, of all places! :D

Sailor Kenshin
02-17-2007, 06:50 PM
In the Arthurian legends, there were four hallows . . . the Grail, a broken sword, a spear dripping blood, and a platter. I think in HP it will tie in to the four "house" items that Voldemort was after.

Speaking of the different versions of the book, I just found the British versions of Goblet of Fire and Prisoner of Azkaban at Value Village, of all places! :D

So I'm not the only one who sees the Arthurian connection!

Christine N.
02-17-2007, 08:44 PM
I think the 'spear dripping blood' was the Spear of Destiny, no?

Sailor Kenshin
02-18-2007, 12:07 AM
I think the 'spear dripping blood' was the Spear of Destiny, no?

Quite likely.

Darzian
12-11-2008, 06:52 AM
Since this is the Harry Potter thread (according to the forum index) I thought of posting something here.

Book 7 SPOILERS, of course.

Why do you think about the introduction of the Deathly Hallows to the series? Some people have said that it is similar to Deus ex because there were no hints anywhere else in the story, and Rowling needed a way for Harry to win. Others felt it was a splendid way to end the series.

I'd also like to discuss the degree of explanation given. Quite a lot of people missed the point completely. At the end, the curse backfired, apparently, because the Elder wand did not belong to Voldy but to Harry. IMO, JKR did not elaborate on that sufficiently and many reviewers on Amazon did not notice this. As a result, many readers misunderstood that it was the protection from Lily (which was already broken) that caused the backfiring. Another sentence or so would have been better.

I also wished to discuss Dumbledore's reappearance at the end of the book.

katiemac
12-11-2008, 07:21 AM
Since a deus ex happens at the climax, no, the hallows weren't a deus ex, even if you treat the entire final book as the climax.

I thought it worked rather well, actually, considering the hallows always existed in the story, we just didn't know they had any other name. One of my favorite things about the final book was that if you read the children's tale about the hallows, it's quite literally a parallel for the entire HP series.

And I'm not sure what you wanted to discuss about the last glimpse of Dumbledore--the portrait or the scene at King's Cross? Either way it didn't read unexpectedly to me.

Darzian
12-11-2008, 08:10 AM
I agree with that. Since the hallows were present throughout out the book, JKR used them well to finish the book.

Dumbledore- I meant the King's Cross part. I guess I'm a little tired of him offering all the explanations at the end of each book. Granted- there's no one else- but I was thinking that he was gone for good. Him suddenly appearing that way is strange, especially as it remains unexplained. He tells Harry that Harry can 'pass on' or return. Well, why didn't he pass on himself? And if he did, how did he return to that place- wherever it was?

I'm an avid fan and can recite almost any detail that anyone would ask but I was a little unsatisfied that it was -once again- Dumbledore who provided all the answers.

AmandaAcidic
12-11-2008, 02:21 PM
Going back to the original topic of the thread,

I have always liked the second one the best. I honestly couldn't tell you why. I don't really know myself. I've just enjoyed it the most. After that it's probably the fourth then the third.

Now I have a hankering to reread the series. I have to many books waiting to be read though... Curse this thread!


P.S. I should not post of here when I'm this sleep deprived.

Darzian
12-11-2008, 07:36 PM
2 and 4 are favorites. 5 was excellent, too- though a little over-the-top with Umbridge.

Pragmatic_Dreamer
01-07-2009, 07:08 AM
I like the books in this order: 3, 4, 1, 2, 5. Books 6 and 7 do not exist in my happy world.

trickywoo
01-07-2009, 09:38 PM
#5 is by far my favorite.

I enjoyed the whole series though - the seventh was a bit of a slog-through, but she earned the right to make it longer since she tied up all the threads.

Cyia
01-07-2009, 10:48 PM
*makes a confession*

I've never read even a page of one Harry Potter book.

*runs away*

sassandgroove
01-08-2009, 02:50 AM
This is how I think the end will go, because that's how the Hero's Journey has to end.

Harry will face You-Know-Who alone.

But first, he will have lost Ron and Hermione.

And Snape. How, I am not certain, but I think Harry will battle Snape, and either Snape will sacrifice himself for Harry, or Harry will put an end to Snape---only to learn that Snape was on his side after all.

Somewhere along the way, Draco will intervene on Harry's behalf. Whether he lives through it or not---well, it's JK's book, not mine.

And then Harry will "die." Literally? Metaphorically? We shall see. He dies in a cave and is reborn. Again, how, is up to the author.I know this quote is from 2006 before the 7th book was out, but I wanted to chime in. I think he should have at least lost Ron, even though it would have killed me. It is forshadowed in book 2, when Ron sacrifices himself in the chess match. Losing Fred to me seems jarring and out of place and doesn't fit with anything. At least with Lupin, it mirrors losing his parents and he has all his mentors to walk with him to face Voldemort.

Since this is the Harry Potter thread (according to the forum index) I thought of posting something here.

Book 7 SPOILERS, of course.

Why do you think about the introduction of the Deathly Hallows to the series? Some people have said that it is similar to Deus ex because there were no hints anywhere else in the story, and Rowling needed a way for Harry to win. Others felt it was a splendid way to end the series.

I'd also like to discuss the degree of explanation given. Quite a lot of people missed the point completely. At the end, the curse backfired, apparently, because the Elder wand did not belong to Voldy but to Harry. IMO, JKR did not elaborate on that sufficiently and many reviewers on Amazon did not notice this. As a result, many readers misunderstood that it was the protection from Lily (which was already broken) that caused the backfiring. Another sentence or so would have been better.

I also wished to discuss Dumbledore's reappearance at the end of the book.
I think the intro of the Hallows is fine. She introduces something in everybook, so it fits. And there are hints, Harry receives the cloak in book one, for instance.

As far as missing that Harry was the master of the Elder wand, I am sorry but I think the people who missed that need to learn to pay attention to detail. Reveiwers on Amazon probably skimmed the book to rush to get a review. It's been a while since I read it but IIRC, Harry actually EXPLAINS it to Voldy during the duel. I mean, how can you miss that? I also think it is brilliant. It is a way to have Harry win while keeping in the theme that Death Eaters kill and the Order stuns.

It doesn't bother me that dumbledore shows up at King's Cross. I sort of figured a lot of that was in Harry's head anyway. Honestly it didn't feel like, "Oh Dumbeldore is explaining AGAIN." To me it fit.

Oh, as to the orig topic, I like Order of the Pheonix best. I love all the action and I love the parts at headquarters where they are cleaning and trying to over hear things. I revel in hating Umbridge. She is such a brilliant bad guy. Evil in following the rules. I love when the teachers turn on her -"I mean, I could have handled it myself but wasn't sure I had the authority." Excellent.

Book 6 felt like a middle book to me as well. I enjoyed it more on second reading. Book 7 have great parts and parts that need edititng. They spend way to much time camping. But I love the way she does things like have them break in to Gringotts. In the first book, Hagrid tells Harry you'd be mad to try and do it. FULL CIRCLE. Brilliant!

Sailor Kenshin
01-08-2009, 08:41 PM
I was wrong in my predictions, but never so happy to stand corrected!

Book 7 was the PERFECT ending. Everything hinted at in the first six books was realized in a way that was both inevitable, surprising, heartbreaking, and yet satisfying.

There's a reason JK's series is a best-seller. All this quibbling over minutia seems sour grapes to me.

sassandgroove
01-08-2009, 08:46 PM
There's a reason JK's series is a best-seller. All this quibbling over minutia seems sour grapes to me.me too. I love the books and can't get enough of them. I am rereading them for the 3rd time. For christmas a freind of mine made me my own Hogwarts scarf. :D BUt I think it is fun to discuss the details.

scarletpeaches
01-08-2009, 08:49 PM
...There's a reason JK's series is a best-seller. All this quibbling over minutia seems sour grapes to me.

I'm sick of accusations of sour grapes against people who don't like the books.

You're allowed to not like them, FFS. There's no law that says HP novels are verboten.

If you like them, great. Read them. I have. I don't rave over them, but meh. They're okay. I've read better.

I can see their faults and no, that does not mean I'm full of sour grapes. It means I'm not one of the sheeple who think the emperor is wearing new clothes.

sassandgroove
01-08-2009, 09:03 PM
Scarlet, I think what shemeans are people quibbling over Rowling's use of commas, overuse of certain words, or that they could write better sentences than her. No one is saying you must like her works. What I mean, and I think Sailor, is that Rowling tells a good story, it doesn't matter if her sentences would be tighter if she took out the word "seemed". However, I can only speak for me and assume what others mean. There are books I don't want to read but I acknowledge the author's talent, like Stephen King.

scarletpeaches
01-08-2009, 09:09 PM
I'm going to have to read the books again in order this time, now I have all seven.

sassandgroove
01-08-2009, 09:25 PM
we're sort of going off topic, but let me tell you a story. When I was in film school, I dated a guy who worked on Space Jam. If youdon't know what that is, it is a silly little movie starring Micheal Jordan and the Looney Tunes, aimed at little kids. He wouldn't tell anyone at school that he worked on it. He lied and said his first film credit was Jerry Macquire, when it was actually Space Jam. Why? Well besides him being a doofus, there were many guys at my school who pitched and moaned about anything successful that wasn't Tarantino or Scorcese. They would grumble and mumble that they could do it better. They vowed never to support Jordan again. My response to them was that it is a movie aimed at little kids, to get over it, and if they can do it better they damn well should and shut the f*** up. Basically- instead of making movies themselves, they were calling Space Jam sour grapes. It isn't because they didn't like Space Jam. I sort of did, but I watched it with a 2 year old and a 4 year old and enjoyed their enjoyment in it. It was their "I could do it better" mumbling without thier actually trying to do it better. And I was doubly annoyed with my then boyfreind for not being proud of his work. He was acutally working in the industry while these yahoos didn't, yet he was ashamed. That's what people, I think, mean about sour grapes. I don't expect everyone to like Harry Potter, but if you can do it better, then shut up and do it, and let the rest of us enjoy it.

DwayneA
01-13-2009, 12:41 AM
I just finished reading the final book. Now I've read through the entire series.

Frankly, I don't understand why the Harry Potter series became such a phenominum (or however you spell it). I asked my librarian this when I borrowed the last book and she didn't have an answer either. So why are the books so popular? I don't understand.

Also, according to something I read on wikipedia, aside from puberty, Harry Potter doesn't change much.

sassandgroove
01-13-2009, 12:48 AM
Also, according to something I read on wikipedia, aside from puberty, Harry Potter doesn't change much.According to wikipedia? YOu read the books, what do YOU think? I could write an essay here about how he grows and changes, but as a writer, you should examine the books to answer that sort of question yourself, not depend on something like wikipedia. Now if you didn't enjoy them that much, then I could see why you would question the phenomena, but whether or not Harry changes you should be able to examine yourself.

Why is it a phenomena? I for one love the world she created and wish I could go visit /live at the Burrow. I want to live in that world. I can't answer for the rest of the fans.

scarletpeaches
01-13-2009, 12:51 AM
I would guess one of the reasons the books are so popular is the attention to detail.

It's not just "This is a magic world. Here is the story," but also ornaments on the mantelpiece, people's memories, household pets, poems and songs, clothes, job descriptions.

If nothing else, Rowling's - and I say this grudgingly - great at worldbuilding. And storytelling.

Actual writing style? Not so much. But the above probably explains why I like the films better than the books. Visually, they're stunning. On the page...well, I'm not so much of a fan. But they're still an entertaining way to pass the time if not the bestest books I've ever read - far from it.

DwayneA
01-13-2009, 12:58 AM
frankly, I never lost myself in the books. Whenever I read, that's what I'm doing, reading. Nothing more.

sassandgroove
01-13-2009, 01:09 AM
but you read all 7. What kept you reading?

DwayneA
01-13-2009, 01:11 AM
I just like to read. Isn't that why people read books?

sassandgroove
01-13-2009, 01:14 AM
Yes.

I'm still curious the answer to your own question about Harry. Do you think he changed, or do you think Wiki is right?

DwayneA
01-13-2009, 01:17 AM
how should I know who to believe? I'm no good at determining how a character changes, grows, or develops. That just happens to be the way my brain works.

sassandgroove
01-13-2009, 01:22 AM
I didn't know that.

I say Wiki is wrong. I've read the books through twice, and am working on the third. Harry grows throughout the books, as do all the characters. He works through his anger at the world, at his aunt and uncle, at losing his parents then his godfather, etc. He goes through that whole teen thing thinking he knows better than adults. he struggles with the thought that maybe he should have been in Slytherin and maybe he is like Voldemort. But at the end of it all he realizes that the choices he makes define who he is not his bloodline or abilities. At one point, given the chance, I think he would have been murderous, but he reaches a point where he, like the ORder of the Pheonix, stuns instead of kills, setting themselves apart from the death eaters. I am curious to see the link in Wiki. I am curious what they see to say he doesn't change. THere are little things too, like how he treats Kreacher.

eyeblink
01-13-2009, 03:27 AM
I would guess one of the reasons the books are so popular is the attention to detail.

It's not just "This is a magic world. Here is the story," but also ornaments on the mantelpiece, people's memories, household pets, poems and songs, clothes, job descriptions.

If nothing else, Rowling's - and I say this grudgingly - great at worldbuilding. And storytelling.

Actual writing style? Not so much. But the above probably explains why I like the films better than the books. Visually, they're stunning. On the page...well, I'm not so much of a fan. But they're still an entertaining way to pass the time if not the bestest books I've ever read - far from it.


Although I read and enjoyed the books (the last three as they came out), the films do benefit from having good directors working on them. That was the major difference between them and The Golden Compass say - the latter was a decent story told without much in the way of style, and it fell flat. Also, it has been argued that the film adaptations (the first four by Steve Kloves, writer/director of The Fabulous Baker Boys) are the thorough structural edit the books should have had.

Jerry B. Flory
01-13-2009, 05:02 AM
Wiki is very wrong and it sounds like someone spiteful wrote that page.
The whole point of taking Harry year by year through school was to make him grow.
Rowling built a great world out of classic witchery like wands and broomsticks, cauldrons, potions and then included the every day witch stuff like potato peelers scouring powder, skele-gro, then there's plants, the magical creatures, talking paintings that could disrupt your day.
She isn't the most word-economical writer ever, but she did a good job under extreme pressure. Especially toward the end of the series when fans were screaming for book six before book five's ink dried.

Sneaky Devil
01-13-2009, 05:08 AM
i adore the HP series...ashamed to admit that i own all seven.........oh well

my fave is hard to choose so i say it's a toss up between PoA, OotP, HBP, and DH

fave quote from the books - Half Blood Prince "Hark who's talking. Confunded anyone lately?"

if you haven't read HBP you probably don't get it but that's ok

Jerry B. Flory
01-13-2009, 05:12 AM
Goblet of Fire was my favorite book and least favorite movie.
It was like they cut all the great parts out of the book and made a movie with what was left.
I was really disappointed with it.

katiemac
01-13-2009, 05:12 AM
I'm not a big fan of the films, actually. I've got no problems with them visually as I think they accomplished some of those elements very well. But I think my problem lies in the idea that my favorite aspects of the books are the small details that turn out to be something really major, plot-wise. And because of the time constraints and structure of film, not to mention that not all the books were written before they began filming the series, those details don't make it to the final script. The movies, then, turn out just a little flat for me.

I do think the films have benefitted from swapping directors, though. Didn't like what Chris Columbus did with the first two--while they were pretty spot-on in terms of keeping with the books, they were also a bit too happy-family-friendly--with music swelling at the end when Harry gives Hagrid a great big hug while the rest of the school cheers on, that kind of thing.


Although I read and enjoyed the books (the last three as they came out), the films do benefit from having good directors working on them. That was the major difference between them and The Golden Compass say - the latter was a decent story told without much in the way of style, and it fell flat. Also, it has been argued that the film adaptations (the first four by Steve Kloves, writer/director of The Fabulous Baker Boys) are the thorough structural edit the books should have had.

Sneaky Devil
01-13-2009, 05:17 AM
i'm with you on that one but i also think they did a bad job with Order of The Phoenix, obviously it was too long to do it properly but still

i've seen a preview for the sixth and it looks good so far, although that doesn't really mean anything. it could turn out horrible

i must say i'm not looking forward to actually watching Dumbledore die, it's bad enough to read about it



Goblet of Fire was my favorite book and least favorite movie.
It was like they cut all the great parts out of the book and made a movie with what was left.
I was really disappointed with it.

Sailor Kenshin
01-13-2009, 05:29 AM
Wiki is very wrong and it sounds like someone spiteful wrote that page.



Which is why I never trust Wiki as a source.

Sailor Kenshin
01-13-2009, 05:30 AM
i adore the HP series...ashamed to admit that i own all seven.........oh well



Why would you be ashamed? Not only do I have all seven but now I'm collecting British editions. :p

Sneaky Devil
01-13-2009, 05:33 AM
only ashamed because of my age really, nobody else my age likes them, not that i know of anyway
:tongueto them i say



Why would you be ashamed? Not only do I have all seven but now I'm collecting British editions. :p

Death Wizard
01-13-2009, 05:56 AM
I have to admit that H.P. hasn't done a whole lot for me, but I tend to not enjoy young adult fantasy. Not that there's anything wrong with Y.A. fantasy. It just doesn't do a whole lot for me, personally.

That said, a lot of us probably conceive of writing it and making a fortune.

sassandgroove
01-13-2009, 06:13 AM
only ashamed because of my age really, nobody else my age likes them, not that i know of anyway
:tongueto them i say
I don't know your age but I am 32.

Between myself and my husband we have two copies of all of them, ones to read and ones to keep nice, but we also have three copies of a few because I prefer paper back for reading and he has a thing about his books and I worry about messing them up. I just bought my own copy of Hitch HIkers Guide for that reason. :)

As of Christmas I also have all 7 audio books! :D:D

Why would you be ashamed? Not only do I have all seven but now I'm collecting British editions. :p
I just found me new goal. :D

Jerry B. Flory
01-13-2009, 06:26 AM
Okay, I admit it.
I once insulted a man by calling him a stupid bubotuber.:rant:

sassandgroove
01-13-2009, 06:30 AM
lol- i was just at Little Ceasar's and the girl complimented my hand made griffyndor scarf. "thanks" I said, "I think I'd actually be in hufflepuff though." "ME too," she replied. The other cashier had no idea what we were talking about, we never once said "Harry Potter." It was great.

Sailor Kenshin
01-13-2009, 06:23 PM
I don't know your age but I am 32.

Between myself and my husband we have two copies of all of them, ones to read and ones to keep nice, but we also have three copies of a few because I prefer paper back for reading and he has a thing about his books and I worry about messing them up. I just bought my own copy of Hitch HIkers Guide for that reason. :)

As of Christmas I also have all 7 audio books! :D:D

I just found me new goal. :D

Hey, the Brit editions have purdy covers. And I is older den u. :D

sassandgroove
01-15-2009, 02:04 AM
OK so I am listening to the book 6 audio book. I noticed something i didn't notice on previous reads I wanted to run by someone.

SPOILER (do I really need to post that this far into a thread?)


When Harry and Dumbledore watch the meeting with Young Dumbledore and 11 yr old Tom Riddle, and Dumbledore is telling him how to get to Daigon Alley, he says to talk to Tom the bar man at the Leaky Cauldron, and that that should be easy enough to remember. But Tom Riddle's reaction shows that he doesn't like the name Tom, that it is common. And he wants to be extraordinary. So my question is, do you think Rowling named the Bar man Tom just for this scene, or is it coincidence? I mean, we learn the Bar Man in the Leaky Cauldron is called Tom in Book One. Did she plan that far ahead in that detail, or was that a happy accident?

Sneaky Devil
01-15-2009, 11:17 PM
HA!

Okay, I admit it.
I once insulted a man by calling him a stupid bubotuber.:rant:


Now i don't feel so bad, i'm 29!

I don't know your age but I am 32.

Between myself and my husband we have two copies of all of them, ones to read and ones to keep nice, but we also have three copies of a few because I prefer paper back for reading and he has a thing about his books and I worry about messing them up. I just bought my own copy of Hitch HIkers Guide for that reason. :)

As of Christmas I also have all 7 audio books! :D:D

I just found me new goal. :D

tailstrike
02-24-2009, 04:42 AM
I own and really like all 7 cant pick a favourite though...The only thing that irks me is the movies...I cant stand when they change things ie how things look...The worst part is when they changed how the Deatheaters looked...from tall hoods to magic masks (i prefer the masks) but all in all i liked the whole series...

dclary
02-24-2009, 05:35 AM
The worst part is when they changed how the Deatheaters looked...from tall hoods to magic masks (i prefer the masks)

Holy mixed messages batman!

Bartholomew
02-24-2009, 05:50 AM
I enjoyed all except the final book.

Bartholomew
02-24-2009, 05:52 AM
OK so I am listening to the book 6 audio book. I noticed something i didn't notice on previous reads I wanted to run by someone.

SPOILER (do I really need to post that this far into a thread?)


When Harry and Dumbledore watch the meeting with Young Dumbledore and 11 yr old Tom Riddle, and Dumbledore is telling him how to get to Daigon Alley, he says to talk to Tom the bar man at the Leaky Cauldron, and that that should be easy enough to remember. But Tom Riddle's reaction shows that he doesn't like the name Tom, that it is common. And he wants to be extraordinary. So my question is, do you think Rowling named the Bar man Tom just for this scene, or is it coincidence? I mean, we learn the Bar Man in the Leaky Cauldron is called Tom in Book One. Did she plan that far ahead in that detail, or was that a happy accident?

My money is on meticulous planning.

Toothpaste
02-24-2009, 06:00 AM
Accident. Tom is such a typical name for a barkeep, I think she gave him that name on the fly when writing the first book. I think it is even possible that when she was writing that scene later with Tom Riddle the idea that they shared a name might not have even occurred to her until she wrote it. And when she did she might have been, "Oh. They share a name. I better make a point out of that because it's not like Tom wouldn't react to someone having his name. And the readers will sure as heck notice. What would Voldy's reaction be? Hmm . . . let's make this a nice moment to show a bit more of Riddle's issues with his family . . ."

I mean, it isn't as if it is a big plot point or anything, it's a tiny moment of character development.

sassandgroove
02-24-2009, 07:26 PM
that's why it is so fun to analyse and wonder about. :D

sassandgroove
02-24-2009, 07:27 PM
I enjoyed all except the final book.
I like the overall story in the final book, but it could use some editing. When she's ON she IS ON, but some parts flail and read like fan fiction. I wonder how it would have been if all 7 books had been written before there were fans.

MsGneiss
11-30-2009, 02:19 AM
It took me a little over a week, and despite my determination to hate it, I didn't. I liked it. Loved it, even. Now that it's over, I'm sad, and that's very much to the book's credit. So now I feel like I need a palette cleanser of some sort, before I can dive back into my serious adult literature, all the while I patiently wait for the next Neil Gaiman novel. Any ideas fellow readers?

P.S. I am an adult.

Cathy C
11-30-2009, 02:40 AM
Hmm... Have you tried any of Cornelia Funke's books? They're sort of a bridge between YA and adult fantasy (although Harry Potter is actually marketed as MG, rather than YA). I really enjoyed The Thief Lord. It won the Newberry and is very literary in many places.

waylander
11-30-2009, 02:56 AM
The Lies of Locke Lamorra

scarletpeaches
11-30-2009, 02:57 AM
The Narnia books.

Or anything by Roald Dahl.

Thump
11-30-2009, 03:05 AM
The Lies of Locke Lamorra

Seconded. Good book.

Also, for something more magical realism, you could try Tim Bowler. Or stick with kids' books (like I do, mostly :D) and read Andy Briggs' Hero.com and Villain.net books.

cscarlet
11-30-2009, 04:31 AM
I'll be no help... once I finished the HP series, I read it again. There's so much more you catch the second time around, knowing what's supposed to happen. JKR is fantastic at foreshadowing. Then about a year later I listened to the series again on "books on tape" (err... CD). I swear, Jim Dale (the narrator) could make an obituary sound exciting...

scarletpeaches
11-30-2009, 04:33 AM
Stephen Fry does the UK audio books. HE RULES!

So there.

Kathleen42
11-30-2009, 04:36 AM
It took me a little over a week, and despite my determination to hate it, I didn't. I liked it. Loved it, even. Now that it's over, I'm sad, and that's very much to the book's credit. So now I feel like I need a palette cleanser of some sort, before I can dive back into my serious adult literature, all the while I patiently wait for the next Neil Gaiman novel. Any ideas fellow readers?

P.S. I am an adult.

Are you specifically looking for YA? Perhaps The Blue Girl by Charles De Lint or The Hunger Games. You might like Going Bovine; parts of it were slightly Douglas Adams-ish.

MsGneiss
12-01-2009, 03:10 AM
Thanks Everyone! Even though I've read a good deal of your suggestions already, there are many here that I haven't. I read a lot of what is termed "urban fantasy," and that's where I categorized the Harry Potter series, even though that may not be entirely accurate. I'd like more of that, only not so much with vampires and werewolves, ala Dresden Files, Sookie Stackhouse, and Anita Blake. Something more along the lines of Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell or Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere.

Cathy C
12-01-2009, 05:20 AM
Hmm... The Thief Lord would still qualify to a certain extent. It's fantasy and urban (but not precisely urban fantasy). Obviously (cough, cough) I should probably mention our stand-alone March urban fantasy, MAGIC'S DESIGN (http://www.amazon.com/Magics-Design-Cat-Adams/dp/0765359634) and our own ChaosTitan's THREE DAYS TO DEAD (http://www.amazon.com/Three-Days-Dead-Kelly-Meding/dp/0553592866/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1259630177&sr=1-1) We have a bunch more members here with new releases out, so you might consider wandering over to the AW Library (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=91) and checking out the SF/Fantasy section. :)

There's also a running Urban Fantasy thread (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=150175) over in the SF/F room that you might check out. It lists everyone's favorites and there HAVE to be a few you haven't read yet. :D

DragonHeart
12-01-2009, 05:29 AM
I don't read a lot of urban fantasy but I really enjoyed Dogs Days and the sequel New Tricks by John Levitt. The third one was just released, too bad I didn't know that until 30 seconds ago. >.< Guess I'll be making another Amazon order soon...

I also third The Lies of Locke Lamora and second The Hunger Games, though neither one is urban fantasy. Still great reads.

bkwriter
12-03-2009, 10:07 AM
You should check out Inkheart series. It's really good but the movie was so so.

Miss T
01-11-2010, 06:24 AM
Oh, Cornelia Funke's Inkheart books are fantastic. Jenny Nimmo's Charlie Bone books were marketed at young Harry Potter fans, but they're fun on their own merits. Eva Ibbotson's books are very charming and very British. Jonathan Stroud's The Bartimaeus Trilogy is a little more complex and an exceptional read. I'm assuming you've already read Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials series, but if you haven't, here's your cue!

AryaT92
01-11-2010, 10:11 AM
Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close...

Shakesbear
01-11-2010, 10:35 AM
I also read the whole series recently. I read Elric of Melnibone by Michael Moorcock as an antidote!

Keyan
01-11-2010, 04:44 PM
The Percy Jackson books? (by Rick Riordan) They're Middle-Grade.

If you want adult urban fantasy with a Neverwherish feel, I really liked some of Simon Green's Nightside books, and his James Bond homages - The Man with the Golden Torc, and Daemons are Forever.

Wavy_Blue
01-12-2010, 01:21 AM
A coworker of mine pitched The Magicians by Lev Grossman as a "Harry Potter for adults". I haven't actually read it yet, but she gushed over it.

Alexis
02-05-2010, 02:20 AM
Hunger Games. If you can read all 7 HPs that fast, it'll take you half a breath (which you'll hold the entire time) to read Hunger Games. It's so well paced and right next to HP on my "top shelf" of books :)

Project nachonaco
03-25-2010, 04:12 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8zBR1l4Tgc

I can't believe this!

THEY RUINED IT!

They cheapened it!

It just seems....I dunno.

And maybe it'll be better, because kids will like it, but Harry's just not a kids' book!

UGH!

Perks
03-25-2010, 04:13 AM
Really? I'm not a huge book-trailer fan, but I thought that was pretty effective.

Project nachonaco
03-25-2010, 04:14 AM
Really? I'm not a huge book-trailer fan, but I thought that was pretty effective.

I'm not either, but it just felt....cheap.

Perks
03-25-2010, 04:17 AM
It seemed to make the movies look cheap and indicate that the books were better. I nearly disagree, because it's one of those rare instances that I appreciated the more streamlined screenplay over the bloated books, but still...

Project nachonaco
03-25-2010, 04:20 AM
Them's fightin' words, Perks. Pick your weaponry. You can either have a squirt gun, a box of kittens, or a pool noodle.

;)

I guess just the way they made it seem like a puppet show.....

Shadow_Ferret
03-25-2010, 04:23 AM
Maybe I'm missing something, but it seemed like a very effective overview of the books. And it is Scholastic. They sell mostly children's books.

Perks
03-25-2010, 04:23 AM
Them's fightin' words, Perks. Pick your weaponry. You can either have a squirt gun, a box of kittens, or a pool noodle.



I guess just the way they made it seem like a puppet show.....
Lol! I know. But 300 pages of wandering in the woods for book 7? Give me strength.

I liked both. And I'm 40 years old and have a slightly wrong-ish crush on 20 year old, Daniel Radcliffe. Its all gone off the rails. I can't help it.

Smish
03-25-2010, 04:41 AM
What's so bad about it? It's just a quick 30 second trailer. You can't pack in much in 30 seconds!

jennontheisland
03-25-2010, 04:49 AM
That ruined Harry Potter?

How?

brokenfingers
03-25-2010, 04:53 AM
How so? I didn't see any sledgehammers or chainsaws used.

Nor was Orlando Bloom in it.

Sage
03-25-2010, 05:01 AM
I thought it looked like a decent trailer. It would have been easy to rely on scenes from the movies, which I think would have been a mistake, and I doubt they could have used non-movie actors in it, so I think it was a pretty good choice. Also, the shadows kind of fit with the new covers I saw online the other day.

Project nachonaco
03-25-2010, 05:05 AM
....New....covers?

leahzero
03-25-2010, 06:14 AM
The part where they show Harry's silhouette with the lit scar looks a lot like Daniel Radcliffe's silhouette.

I don't think this was meant to dis the movies. But I do agree that it seems a bit cartoonish, focusing on the iconic action scenes. Maybe it's aiming at younger readers.

jennontheisland
03-25-2010, 06:27 AM
A MG/YA series being marketed to younger readers??

How bizarre.

Project nachonaco
03-25-2010, 06:27 AM
Hehehe. :p

Maybe I just take my childhood too seriously? :p

DavidZahir
03-25-2010, 08:21 PM
Wow. Overreaction much?

Really--opening this thread I thought some new film adaptation was in the works directed by Stephen Sommers and starring Mike Myers as Dumbledore. All I saw was an innocuous trailer for the book series.

Project nachonaco
03-25-2010, 08:23 PM
Wow. Overreaction much?

Really--opening this thread I thought some new film adaptation was in the works directed by Stephen Sommers and starring Mike Myers as Dumbledore. All I saw was an innocuous trailer for the book series.

I take my childhood very seriously. :p

Shakesbear
03-25-2010, 09:54 PM
The music and sound - I hesitate to say effects - really don't help. Bit strong to say that a bit of tacky advertising can ruin an international phenomenon!

underthecity
03-25-2010, 10:57 PM
I thought it was a very nicely done book trailer.

It was a trailer for the books, not the films, and I think was produced for its pre-teen audience to view.

I can take or leave Harry Potter, but I thought this trailer was effective.

fredXgeorge
04-13-2010, 07:22 AM
I've been reading Harry Potter since I was 8 and don't mind it at all. I mean, its made to appeal to kids.

Anarchic Q
04-13-2010, 11:10 AM
A) I presume you've already read them. So no harm done to you.
B) You have the option of buying the pretty cover editions. So no harm to you.
C) Whatever gets kids reading is A+ in my mind. No harm to you.
D) You have the movies if you want Dark and Edgy.

Bartholomew
04-13-2010, 11:41 AM
Maybe I'm missing something, but it seemed like a very effective overview of the books. And it is Scholastic. They sell mostly children's books.

I agree. I liked it.

vfury
04-13-2010, 03:39 PM
I liked it. It reminded me of the feeling I got when I was twelve and read the first book. I felt like I'd stumbled across this book full of magic and bizarre characters that was nothing like anything I'd experienced before. The other stuff comes later.

katiemac
04-13-2010, 06:45 PM
I thought it was cute. I especially liked the whomping willow tossing the car out of the tree. It has charm.

Now I have to go find these new covers.

mdin
04-13-2010, 08:58 PM
When I saw this headline, I thought it was going to be this:

Hermione's Stalker (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-N8x0Fb3Rxg). (Oh, and uh... NSFW)

CACTUSWENDY
04-13-2010, 09:06 PM
Read them all, saw all the movies. Since this was written for the younger gang I think it's a fine/good trailer. I think there's something for everyone in the HP books....all ages.

mscelina
04-13-2010, 09:17 PM
Lol! I know. But 300 pages of wandering in the woods for book 7? Give me strength.

I liked both. And I'm 40 years old and have a slightly wrong-ish crush on 20 year old, Daniel Radcliffe. Its all gone off the rails. I can't help it.

Amen, my sister. Amen.

Personally, I though the book trailer did what it was supposed to do--market this series to Scholastic's target audience. *shrug* Didn't seem cheap to me, it seemed like a fairly well put together book trailer for a series that consistently has regular sales even this long after their original release dates.

thinkerbeat
10-16-2010, 05:28 PM
I've been asking myself, what is it that I like about the Harry Potter series? I think they are really good books and the success is impressive. But what is it about Harry Potter himself that I like?

The answer is, nothing. Would I really want to be Harry Potter? Not at all. I mean, why would anyone? What's there to like about him?

Then I realized it was the combination of the three: Harry, Hermione and Ron. That's what I like about the stories. I'd love to have Hermione and Ron as friends. That's why I'd want to be Harry Potter. I don't think Harry's character amounts to much, but with friends like that, I could see the appeal in being Harry Potter.

Is it just me, or does it seem that Harry Potter by himself is a bit distant? I don't even get the impression that he's a real person, like I do with Hermione and Ron.

regdog
10-16-2010, 05:34 PM
I think Harry is a bit distant except with Ron and Hermione because of all he's been through. His home life was horrible and he had no one to talk to for years. When he was young everything he said was mocked or ridiculed. To me it seems natural he wouldn't be as open and engaging as Ron and Hermione who came from close supportive families.

thefreshchuff
10-17-2010, 09:20 AM
I definitely see what you mean. When someone asks my favorite HP character, I never say Harry. By books six and seven, I actually came to dislike him a little (some of his snappy retorts to people like Snape or the MoM smacked of arrogance).

As for him being distant, I'll bet a part of it is because he's set up to be an almost neutral main character who we see the rest of the book's world through.

kittyhoward
10-24-2010, 04:44 AM
I actually really like Harry's personality. He's definitely a bit aloof, but when you look back at his life, you see everybody he has lost and how that has conditioned him to be that way. I don't think he was "set up" to be a neutral character, I think there is perfectly good examples shown as to why he is the way he is. Personally, he's one of my favorite characters of the series. He's got good depth to him, in my opinion. He's brave but reckless and foolish, nervous and sometimes scared but knows he has to do the right thing. He's loyal, although albeit selfish at times.

Ron is easier to dislike, he's thoughtless a lot of the time, and callous. He's not exactly who I would choose for a best friend because although in the end he's loyal to those he loves, the comments he makes during that process wouldn't be worth it.

Hermione is smart, and she would be a good friend, but I'd probably end up punching her after awhile, lol.

Out of those three, Harry is definitely my favorite!

Calla Lily
10-24-2010, 04:48 AM
I'm in the minority: I don't like Harry. He's always struck me as a whiny brat. Esp. starting with book 4, when he turned into a hormonal whiny teenager. I live with 2 of those; thanks. I don't need them in my reading. :rolleyes:

Yes, I've read all 7 books. I always read what my kids are reading. (I got into some wildly inappropriate books as a pre-teen and early teen.) I would actually like to see if Rowling can make the jump to adult fic. I'd like to see what Harry does as an adult, now that he's saved the world and all. Because I disliked Harry so intensely, that's proof to me that she's a very good writer.

kittyhoward
10-24-2010, 04:50 AM
I kind of liked that he had his hissy fits moments, because it showed to me that he was a real teenager boy and not simply The Boy Who Lived, you know? It gave him added character rather than just be this perfect hero that saves the day.

Calla Lily
10-24-2010, 05:01 AM
Oh, I agree: He was definitely 3D.

kittyhoward
10-24-2010, 05:06 AM
It's probably really bad that I am in this thread, I am a bit irrational in my love for Harry Potter (series and character) and will rabidly discuss it to death. Oops!

Calla Lily
10-24-2010, 05:10 AM
I'll try to morph myself back to my teenage years--when my love for Frodo Baggins knew no bounds--and we can try to one-up each other. :D

thinkerbeat
10-24-2010, 02:59 PM
I'll try to morph myself back to my teenage years--when my love for Frodo Baggins knew no bounds--and we can try to one-up each other. :D

It's interesting you mention Frodo. I feel the same way about him as I do Harry Pottter. I'd much rather be Sam. Maybe that's just the kind of person I am, wanting to be a sidekick and not bear the burden.

Now I'm wondering, how can we make our main characters interesting and likeable, if they have so much tension attached to them?

regdog
10-24-2010, 03:33 PM
I think showing the true flaws of a MC including being moody or difficult makes the MC more believable. I'm not a big fan of the wonderfully perfect in every way MC. No on is perfect and to expect a MC to be kind, good, patient, smart, etc is too much.

Calla Lily
10-24-2010, 07:06 PM
What regdog said. :)

Satori1977
10-24-2010, 08:15 PM
I am reading these now. I think Harry is a very real character, and he has gone through a lot, but at times he is annoying. Reading Order of the Phoenix right now, and the fits he throws in that book (at least in the beginning, I am about page 200) are a little much.

My favorite character is Ron. I also really like Snape. But more than the people, I think I love the world they live in. The amount of worldbuilding that Rowlings does is amazing. Puts me right in the story.

regdog
10-24-2010, 08:24 PM
But more than the people, I think I love the world they live in. The amount of worldbuilding that Rowlings does is amazing. Puts me right in the story.

Me too. The more I read the books, the more I feel like I'm sitting there as things are happening. Rowlings really pulled me into their world

kittyhoward
10-25-2010, 02:37 AM
You have no idea how much I wish I could attend Hogwarts, LOL.

Stlight
10-25-2010, 04:11 AM
When I first read them, (read 1-4 several times and 5 - 7 once each) I didn't like what Harry became in 5. I couldn't re-read them. I wanted to, I knew I'd gone too fast and missed stuff, but I couldn't do it.

Now that some time has passed, I can see that JKR wrote Harry's behavior to match the behavior we frequently see in an abused child. He is angry and moody beyond what is normal for a teenage boy (right? Never had anything to do with them.)

He does feel he is the only one who can save the world for two reasons. The basic and obvious one is people have been telling him this ever since he reached the wizard world. The ones who have told him he's no big deal are, Malloy, or appear to be, Snape, on the side of Voldermort. The underlying and unspoken reason would be that for all of his life that he can remember his survival has depended on him. He had to figure out how to get around his aunt, uncle and cousin. He had to figure out how to get enough to eat and a safe place to sleep. (Remember Dudly takes his food and bangs on his door and stomps on the staris metophroically and literally threatening actions toward someone hanging on the edge.)

And Harry was afraid of Dudly, which was reasonable.

At least this is the way I see it right now.

C.bronco
10-25-2010, 04:19 AM
I believe that Harry Potter is a regular kid who struggles to see himself that way. He is easy to identify with because he follows through like a normal child faced with bizarre circumstances.

Plus, the whole wizarding world thing is extremely appealing to all of those readers who love the fantastic. He is always in awe of that world, and even when in the midst of it, and going through the normal teen angst, he still comes across as a real kid who would be compelled to make the decisions he has made.

Zefiris
10-26-2010, 07:46 PM
I get what you mean.

I just don't care about him. It's not that I hate him, he's just meh to me. Which is odd because by rights he should be a cool character.

The Harry Potter series' greatest strength is how good the supporting cast is. Ron, Hermione, Lupin, Sirius, Tonks, Fred & George, Snape, Dumbledore, Luna, Neville, Draco. . .

They are all excellant, interesting characters. I find myself caring more about all of them than I do Harry.

As good as the HP series are I think I would have actually preferred Neville to be the Main Character. He ain't my favourite character in the books but seeing a clumsy, pretty useless but well-meaning and brave kid attempting to defeat Voldemort would have been a lot more interesting than Harry who was borderline Mary-Sue at times with how quickly and how well he succeeded at pretty much everything. . .

CaroGirl
10-26-2010, 08:34 PM
I absolutely like and care about Harry, despite the teenage angst. I think Ron is far worse in that department, with his moodiness, grudges and over-reactions.

My favourite characters are definitely Snape and Neville. The character I really didn't like was Dumbledore. I thought he was a bit of a jerk, especially later in the series.

regdog
10-26-2010, 09:03 PM
I never understood why Dumbledore just didn't level with Harry early on in book 5. It might have made things easier for Harry.

Toothpaste
10-26-2010, 09:26 PM
I'm a Lupin girl. Seriously in love with him. That is . . . until he met Tonks and then his whole character changed from being kind lovely teacher who was also the head of the Order, to moody guy who doesn't want a younger woman to fall for him. I think it was one of Rowling's worst decisions, the Tonks/Lupin relationship. It could have worked, if it hadn't brought out the worst in both characters.

CaroGirl
10-26-2010, 09:33 PM
I'm a Lupin girl. Seriously in love with him. That is . . . until he met Tonks and then his whole character changed from being kind lovely teacher who was also the head of the Order, to moody guy who doesn't want a younger woman to fall for him. I think it was one of Rowling's worst decisions, the Tonks/Lupin relationship. It could have worked, if it hadn't brought out the worst in both characters.
Oh, I agree with this! I LOVED Lupin in his book; after that, not so much.

hollyfan
10-29-2010, 05:55 PM
Okay, I have never read these books, apart from the first one in dribs and drabs, and my life was very stressful at the time and I didn't pay proper attention.

But now my hardback boxset has arrived, I am going to read them all, properly! Would anyone like to share with me what they think I'm in for?


Thanks.

Prawn
10-29-2010, 05:56 PM
Is gets serious-er and grim-er as they get older and deal with more serious things.

CaroGirl
10-29-2010, 06:00 PM
You'll get sucked into the world and characters pretty quickly.

Prawn's right, the books grow progressively darker. But they also get longer and more rambling, like she fired her editor or something. Stick with it, though, they're a great read.

Greeble
10-29-2010, 06:00 PM
Is gets serious-er and grim-er as they get older and deal with more serious things.

Harry is also getting loonier and more paranoid with halfway through, shouting and screaming like a madman how everybody is out to get him. Talk about character derailment.

Susan Littlefield
10-29-2010, 06:14 PM
Have fun with Harry Potter, Holly. I think it's waiting for you join his world for awhile...:D

Smish
10-29-2010, 06:19 PM
I wish I was reading them again for the first time. I'm completely jealous. :)

PeterL
10-29-2010, 06:30 PM
I read the first four and recently started thinking about reading the rest. The books are better than the movies, of course, but Caro is right; they do some rambling.

hollyfan
10-29-2010, 06:34 PM
I wish I was reading them again for the first time. I'm completely jealous. :)


How strange! You know, just as I delved back into this thread, I said to myself, "I'm sure there are going to be some jealous people", and then I read your post!

Magic! Lol!

Zefiris
10-29-2010, 06:36 PM
You won't be able to put them down.

They are really excellant, Rowling completely sucks you into her world and makes you care about even the most minor of characters.

Supporting characters are imo Rowling's greatest strength, in fact I'd say the Harry Potter series has got the best and most interesting cast of characters in any book, film, tv series etc.

Jamesaritchie
10-29-2010, 06:38 PM
Loved them all enough to read them twice. Great books, great writing. What more could you want?

Zefiris
10-29-2010, 06:40 PM
I must have read each of them about 10 times each :)

Which is the most I've re-read any book.

CaroGirl
10-29-2010, 06:47 PM
I read the series once to myself and a second time to my kids. They make quite good read-alouds, if you have children who are interested in hearing the story but are too young to read it for themselves.

I can't imagine reading any one book that many times. My to-be-read pile already feels over my head!

Cathy C
10-29-2010, 06:55 PM
I adored all of the books. But one in particular (I think it's Order of the Phoenix) will make you want to chew off your arm for the first hundred pages. It's a slow, drawling read. But the events are critical to later issues, so stick with it. After those pages, it romps along great guns. My hubby nearly threw it at the wall but I convinced him to keep reading and he was very glad he did. :)

Kyla Laufreyson
10-29-2010, 07:33 PM
They're amazing and you will love them.

KodyBoye
10-29-2010, 07:47 PM
Harry is also getting loonier and more paranoid with halfway through, shouting and screaming like a madman how everybody is out to get him. Talk about character derailment.

In Harry's defense, I think I'd get pretty loonie too. His character (as it developed, at least) painted him as a child who couldn't understand what he was going through, then as a teenager who tried to deny it right up until he was no longer able to do so.

Smish
10-29-2010, 07:58 PM
How strange! You know, just as I delved back into this thread, I said to myself, "I'm sure there are going to be some jealous people", and then I read your post!

Magic! Lol!

That's the spirit! :D


I must have read each of them about 10 times each :)

Which is the most I've re-read any book.



I can't imagine reading any one book that many times. My to-be-read pile already feels over my head!

I've probably read them all ten times, too - at least parts of them. My to-be-read pile is ginormous, too, but sometimes, I can't start a new book.

I've never had the will power to stop reading. If I start a new book, and I'm enjoying it, I have to know the ending as soon as possible. So, in college and law school, during exam time, if I felt like reading, I'd pick up something I had already read, so I'd be able to put it back down and get back to work (and often, it was Harry Potter). The same was true while studying for the bar exam, and now when I'm preparing for trial or for an important hearing (and it's often still Harry Potter that I'll pick up).

Toothpaste
10-29-2010, 08:00 PM
I think you'll be surprised how funny they are. People talk about the world building and the epic story and whether Harry goes nuts or not (I think he stays totally in character, fyi, becoming a teen and being the chosen one at the same time can result in some pretty moody moments), but not always about Rowling's humour. Which, in my opinion, is her strongest asset.

Also remember everyone will have their own opinions and fav books. You had someone above say how much they hated the beginning of Order of the Phoenix, but for me, after Prisoner of Azkaban, it was my fav book - yes, even though it was a bit overwritten. Just read the books and draw your own conclusions.

Jozzy
10-29-2010, 08:39 PM
Seven HPs in one go? Be prepared: Get plenty of sleep ahead of time, drink lots of fluids (you can take the book to the john with you,) Send Wife/Husband/Kids away to grandma's. Oh, and stock up on coffee and oreos.

Renee Collins
10-29-2010, 08:47 PM
I read the series once to myself and a second time to my kids. They make quite good read-alouds, if you have children who are interested in hearing the story but are too young to read it for themselves.


Such a great idea! I think I might do just that. :)

Rhoda Nightingale
10-29-2010, 09:08 PM
I just recently reread the entire series myself--in anticipation of the last movie--and boy, you are in for a treat. I enjoyed reading them the first time around, but there is so much that I missed--I was amazed at the amount of detail and background that went into every single volume. You will love them!

Phaeal
10-29-2010, 09:31 PM
The series is so close to great. Several major plot/character/milieu holes keep it only very good for me. But there are some scenes that touch greatness. Can't tell you about them and ruin the surprises. ;)

dclary
10-29-2010, 09:39 PM
Just read them. Reading them is better than talking about reading them.

BradCarsten
10-29-2010, 09:48 PM
fantastic books- first time I read them I loved every moment of every one of them. I got the stephan fry audio versions. The chap is fantastic- he has a unique voice for every character, including the fat lady portrait..... "Pass-wooOOOrd"

ceenindee
10-29-2010, 10:04 PM
You will love it. I've been a fan since the start, but I've never read them all at once until now (which I'm doing to gear up for the new movie XD). It's really changed my perception of the series. You see continuities you never notice when you read the books on their own. The writing gets better as the series goes (IMHO), and the characters and content mature realistically. It's a treat. I hope you enjoy.

Kyla Laufreyson
10-29-2010, 10:15 PM
I just recently reread the entire series myself--in anticipation of the last movie--and boy, you are in for a treat. I enjoyed reading them the first time around, but there is so much that I missed--I was amazed at the amount of detail and background that went into every single volume. You will love them!

This.

There are so many things that Rowling built into even the first book that once you've read the seventh, you go back and realise, "Holy crap! She did that right there!?" There is so much depth to them, it's spectacular.

Also, you will probably cry at least once during the series.

Scribhneoir
10-30-2010, 02:51 AM
I read them all in one go last year. As the books got longer, so did my nights. Read until dawn more than once because I couldn't put them down.

Satori1977
10-30-2010, 04:02 AM
I finally started reading them a couple of months ago in anticipation of the last two movies. In the middle of the Order of Phoenix, actually. I seriously cannot put the books down. I have the next one on hold from the library now, so I know it will be ready when I finish this one.

Great books, amazing worldbuilding. Rowling is a really good storyteller.

N. M. Hayden
10-30-2010, 04:59 AM
Would anyone like to share with me what they think I'm in for?


Utter delight.

-Nick

Because.
10-30-2010, 07:01 AM
You are in for an abundance of epicness.

Kaylee
10-30-2010, 07:19 AM
I read them so much and was raving about them to my sister. I told her to take them and read them. She became an instant fan.

maggi90w1
10-30-2010, 05:58 PM
The Harry Potter series' greatest strength is how good the supporting cast is. Ron, Hermione, Lupin, Sirius, Tonks, Fred & George, Snape, Dumbledore, Luna, Neville, Draco. . .

They are all excellant, interesting characters. I find myself caring more about all of them than I do Harry.

I second this. Harry's ok. He's a decent kid but he doesn't stands out in any way (minus the whole chosen one business).
Nonetheless a very well written character. With strengths and flaws and an organic development.

I find it pretty hard to make compelling main characters anyway.
I'm wondering if we still would like Lupin so much if we would have to follow his angst through seven books or Fred with his immature behavior or Luna with her strangeness.
Every trait get's kinda annoying when you read about it for 6000 pages.

ceramiccoconut
10-30-2010, 07:41 PM
They're the books that got me into reading, so you're in for something special. As others have said, there are some ups and downs (I'm of the lot that Order of the Phoenix is a down... though Umbridge is a spectacularly hateable character--in a good way). Half-Blood Prince is my personal favorite.

Fantastic characters (main and minimal). Epic worldbuilding. Brilliant continuity. Amazing story. It's pretty genius all around.

Eddyz Aquila
10-30-2010, 10:51 PM
Whole collection for me. :)
I remember I loved them so much I read the 6th book is around 40 hours, with only like 10 hours of sleeping in between and the rest just reading.

7th book was really dark and gloomy, not that fun.

The third was my favourite, Prisoner of Azkaban.

ebennet68
10-31-2010, 07:52 AM
I'm jealous too. I read the first two books in the series and really enjoyed them. Once I got to Prisoner of Azkaban, I was in love though. Enjoy!

quicklime
10-31-2010, 09:01 AM
You'll get sucked into the world and characters pretty quickly.

Prawn's right, the books grow progressively darker. But they also get longer and more rambling, like she fired her editor or something. Stick with it, though, they're a great read.


lmao....much as I love King, and I do, he has the same thing going....I think it is called "once they start raking in cash, nobody wants to fuck with them" syndrome.

Never read potter, but I did hear rowling and her work matured considerably over the series, so if you liked the first you should not grow tired of them as they progress. (as opposed to the dark tower, where I think King himself lost the thread around book 4 and ham-fisted his way through a forced creation of the rest of the books)

SaltwaterServr
10-31-2010, 09:46 AM
My nephew got Order of the Phoenix for Xmas when it came out. I started reading it, and he said that I could borrow it. 13 hours later, I finished it after a few breaks for more turkey and stuffing. I've heard more than a few people say it is the worst of the series, but I enjoyed it nonetheless.

Ardent Kat
10-31-2010, 10:04 AM
fantastic books- first time I read them I loved every moment of every one of them. I got the stephan fry audio versions. The chap is fantastic- he has a unique voice for every character, including the fat lady portrait..... "Pass-wooOOOrd"

Ditto. I'm "reading" the series for the first time right now by listening to them on audio CD from the library. The voice-acting is top-notch. He does a kickass Prof Mcgonagall.

I tried reading the first two books way back when, but they didn't really grab me. Too much whimsy for my tastes. But it relies less on the whimsy and more on the characters as the books progress, I find. Still gotta read books 4, 6, and 7... (Skipping 4 and going straight on to 5 was a mistake in hindsight)

hollyfan
11-01-2010, 05:48 PM
Thanks everyone, I'm so excited now! I can't wait! I'm starting the first one tonight!

regdog
11-02-2010, 03:13 PM
I've just started the series, yet again :)

Sheila Muirenn
11-02-2010, 05:51 PM
I never understood why Dumbledore just didn't level with Harry early on in book 5. It might have made things easier for Harry.

Well, Harry had to die willingly in order to cast the same charm on the people around him as his mother cast on him. Namely that Voldemort wouldn't be able to harm him or them. Remember that in the end, Voldy's charms didn't have their full power.

I think a lot of JK's logic got muddled (muggled?) in the details though. There was also the whole elder wand thing. Originally its power was meant to die with Dumbledore when Snape killed him, but Draco killed him instead, so Harry got that power later. And Dumbledore couldn't plan that. It's all related because it has to do with dyinging willingly to provide others protection. Dumbledore meant to protect everyone from the Elder wand by dying.

But frankly, when the final horcrux being inside Harry issue was explained, it was a bit of a contradiction. Did his mother's charm still protect him? Or was it Voldemort's horcrux; the one that still existed in Nagini, since Voldemort had just destroyed the Horcrux in Harry? The idea of a Nagini Horcrux keeping Harry alive was too nasty, right? That wasn't addressed. But Nagine was destroyed last.


In the end, Dumbledore said Harry's mother still protected Harry. Didn't his mother's protection expire when he was 17? So at that mutual death of Voldemort and Harry in the forest, Harry was protected by either Nagini, or the piece of soul that had attached itself to his own essence that Voldemort was about to unwittingly destroy, or by his mother. Oh, and by the fact that Voldemort used his blood to regenerate himself, since that blood still contained his mother's protection. So, the charm his mother cast protected Voldemort and Harry when Voldemort tried to kill Harry, (and the spell apparently rebounded yet again) and yet that charm expired when he was 17. Sigh. Something is always off here.

Or maybe V killed the Horcrux but not Harry? And yet I think he did kill Harry and Himself, but that both survived due to outside protection.

Point being Harry had to believe he was dying. But it's not clear exactly why. After all, since the wand being under Harry's influence was in issue Dumbledore hadn't known about, how could Voldemort be killed in the end if that didn't happen? Harry was just supposed to win because Voldemort had a wand that didn't belong to him? Or did Dumbledore plan for Snape or someone to kill Voldy, and for Harry to die in the final, Horcrux-free battle?

The only word I find for this logic is discombubulated!

Oh, and my favorite characters are MacGonagall and Hermione. But I like Harry too, and always considered him an abused child. In fact, I didn't start reading the books until after number 4 came out, and at its end, I was worried about him being left on his own for the summer after being abducted by Voldemort, Cedric's death, etc. etc.!

readitnweep
11-02-2010, 08:06 PM
After my dad passed away I couldn't settle down to read a magazine, never mind a book, and I usually go through two or three a week... until I picked up Prisoner of Azkaban on my son's urging. I hadn't been so emotionally sucked into characters and a story in years.

And Toothpaste is right: it is very funny. I've now read the whole series several times, and am reading it now to my two youngest boys. Rowling is brilliant at character development. I hope you enjoy them somewhere near as much as I have.

Paradox11
11-03-2010, 11:36 PM
I'm about to start reading this series as well. Something I've been meaning to do for a while.

fredXgeorge
11-04-2010, 01:50 AM
HARRY POTTER IS THE GREATEST THING OF ALL TIME. But that's just my humble opinion ;)

zpeteman
11-04-2010, 02:30 AM
The first two are not particularly good. Stick with it, though. She improves by leaps and bounds from the third book on.

fredXgeorge
11-04-2010, 03:07 PM
I don't get the comments about Harry just being whiny. His parents died when he was one year old, he was brought up by people who hated and abused him, not to mention a dark lord is constantly trying to kill him. Plus he has to go through all the teenage angst that everyone else does. And then people who he comes to love keep getting killed in front of him. Through all of this he still sees good in the world and wants to keep fighting for those he loves. I think he's a great character. He's extremely flawed but that adds to the humanity of him.

MsGneiss
11-10-2010, 08:25 PM
I've been asking myself, what is it that I like about the Harry Potter series? I think they are really good books and the success is impressive. But what is it about Harry Potter himself that I like?

The answer is, nothing. Would I really want to be Harry Potter? Not at all. I mean, why would anyone? What's there to like about him?

Then I realized it was the combination of the three: Harry, Hermione and Ron. That's what I like about the stories. I'd love to have Hermione and Ron as friends. That's why I'd want to be Harry Potter. I don't think Harry's character amounts to much, but with friends like that, I could see the appeal in being Harry Potter.

Is it just me, or does it seem that Harry Potter by himself is a bit distant? I don't even get the impression that he's a real person, like I do with Hermione and Ron.

I think you are definitely right, especially since one of the biggest themes in the book was the importance of friendship and how difficult (and pointless) it is to go through life without close friends. The biggest difference between LV and Harry is that Harry had friends he loved and trusted, while LV did not.

friendlyhobo
05-06-2011, 12:06 AM
My girlfriend and I decided in a whirlwind of nostalgia, geeky obsession, and couples' competitiveness that while we have a break from classes (though not work) we're not only going to re-read all seven Harry Potter books, but we're going to make it a race!
While fun (to me at least)...I agreed to this before actually thinking about how long this might take. They aren't intellectually taxing but, you know, all seven in succession.
So, anybody have a better estimation of how long it might take?

Also, anybody feel like joining? I think it would be fun to make it a delightful group venture than a one on one death match.

P.S. I know that not everybody likes, cares about, or would see the point of this, you don't have to tell me ;)

ceenindee
05-06-2011, 01:08 AM
I re-read them all at the pace of one book a week not long ago, and I'm sure you could go faster than that...the first three could be done in a day or two apiece. I feel like a month is a fair amount of time.

Satori1977
05-06-2011, 05:57 PM
I would if I had read them when they came out. But in anticipation of the last movie(s) I actually read them for the first time just this past year.