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Harlequin
09-17-2017, 12:06 AM
No, you didn't misread the numbers. Here's the link, and good luck.

I can't do this: I can't imagine a future which isn't bleak :p

https://medium.com/economicsecproj/into-the-black-a-short-fiction-contest-with-a-big-prize-f91cd6553967

Maryn
09-17-2017, 01:11 AM
Know what's sad? That's big enough money that authors way better than me would be my competition.

Maryn, self-doubter extraordinaire

Harlequin
09-17-2017, 01:40 AM
I showed my partner the link. He read it, and said in tones of utmost puzzlement, "But what's the point? We already know life would be better with those conditions. Nobody needs a story to convince them of that."

MaeZe
09-17-2017, 06:07 AM
Looks like a dilemma, how to write a story that fits the theme without being entirely cynical. A basic income of $12,000/yr here in the NW would be enough to maybe live in your car instead of under a tarp on the side of the freeway.

Harlequin
09-18-2017, 04:48 PM
True... But I would try to think of it as $12000 for a short story rather than an income. Also the short listers get $1000 too so more than just one prize worth winning.

AW Admin
09-18-2017, 05:06 PM
Moving this to the Contests subforum.

Harlequin
09-18-2017, 05:20 PM
Oh sorry, my bad!

PastyAlien
09-18-2017, 07:23 PM
From their Official Rules


Eligibility

1) The contest is open to writers living in the United States, writing in English, and age 18 or over at the time of submissionThat's me, out (I'm Canadian). But good luck to my American friends. :)

MaeZe
09-18-2017, 10:23 PM
I have a story concept but lack a plot. Going to have to keep thinking about it. Not that I think I have a snowball's chance in hell of winning, but the story topic intrigues me.

Kylie Chanae
09-18-2017, 10:33 PM
Their requirements for winning are a little intense. If you accept the prize money, you are agreeing to represent their concept, in essence, any time they call upon you for interviews or appearances on shows. They want to follow the winner's creative process through a year of living on the basic income. I imagine that it will be fantastic publicity, but sheesh! The pressure!

Filigree
09-19-2017, 09:21 AM
Hmm, seems like all one might need to do is riff on some Iain Banks 'Culture' ideas. I'm going for it.

Tazlima
09-19-2017, 05:41 PM
Hey, somebody has to win, right? I'll give it a shot. Worst case scenario, I have another short story to shop around.

Filigree
09-19-2017, 07:41 PM
That's how I look at it. I have a couple of novels coming out next year, so this could be decent publicity if I get into finalist stage.

CalRazor
09-25-2017, 04:41 AM
Their requirements for winning are a little intense. If you accept the prize money, you are agreeing to represent their concept, in essence, any time they call upon you for interviews or appearances on shows. They want to follow the winner's creative process through a year of living on the basic income. I imagine that it will be fantastic publicity, but sheesh! The pressure!

Yeah. That made me a little leery too.

MaeZe
09-25-2017, 07:50 AM
I'm going to give it a shot. I have a story idea that is developing. As for their requirements of the winner, hey, who cares, I'm trying to get noticed so my books will have some cred.

My biggest concern is balancing my political skepticism with the contest organizers' optimism.

Harlequin
09-25-2017, 09:48 AM
*cheers you all on* :-)

ThomasH
02-28-2018, 08:39 PM
That's a crazy prize! But my immediate thought was the same as Maryn's - I'm not anywhere close to being able to compete with the level of writing that contest would garner.
That said, I'd still try simply for the experience! Wish I was here before the deadline.

MaeZe
02-28-2018, 10:19 PM
Inspiration failed me in the end. But here are the winners:

Into the Black: the winning stories (https://medium.com/economicsecproj/into-the-black-the-winning-stories-ea6a9228b5cb)

The top prize went to story where an AI (George) takes it upon itself to redistribute wealth using the concept of collecting the pennies from rounding down numbers in large accounts.

When George finds accounts that have amassed large stockpiles of money, it decides to round down instead of up, and funnel those pennies into a dividend fund. In the end, technology accomplishes what we could not achieve ourselves: a redistribution scheme that holds abusers accountable and ensures no one is left in tears.

If I recall, Office Space used something like that in the plot.

The second story adds a missing person mystery to addressing the surveillance state that would arise from the income distribution.

I'm sorry I wasn't more motivated to finish.