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View Full Version : When to nudge after speaking to owner of agency? (they have a full of my MS)



Turniphead2
05-29-2017, 07:31 PM
Hi all,

I'm in an unusual position, as two weeks after sending my full to the agency, I called the owner and the main agent on the phone: he said I should email his partner (the one that has the full in three weeks!)

I know a nudge usually comes after the full has been out for two months. Should I listen to the owner of the agency and nudge when he suggested or wait; three weeks in total doesn't seem to be long enough, but who knows maybe it is (this is a top UK agency)

If I do nudge in three weeks, what should my email say?

Many thanks for listening.

Turnip

Cyia
05-29-2017, 07:48 PM
Why did you call them if you knew how long to wait before a nudge? It's a major breach of protocol (in the US) to call an agent/agency that doesn't rep. you.

Old Hack
05-29-2017, 09:39 PM
Hi all,

I'm in an unusual position, as two weeks after sending my full to the agency, I called the owner and the main agent on the phone: he said I should email his partner (the one that has the full in three weeks!)

I know a nudge usually comes after the full has been out for two months. Should I listen to the owner of the agency and nudge when he suggested or wait; three weeks in total doesn't seem to be long enough, but who knows maybe it is (this is a top UK agency)

If I do nudge in three weeks, what should my email say?

Many thanks for listening.

Turnip

You shouldn't have called. But as you did, you should follow the advice you were given.

I'm going to move this from Publishing Resources to Ask The Agent, where it's a better fit.

Turniphead2
05-29-2017, 09:41 PM
He was very friendly and didn't seem to mind, and just said call his co-agent after 3 weeks. I think calling anyone in the UK after a week of no contact is fine: the question is, if I do nudge - what should I put in the email.

PS thanks for your reply.

Turniphead

Cyia
05-29-2017, 09:44 PM
I would assume you say exactly what happened. "I spoke with X and s/he said I should touch base in [time frame]."

Turniphead2
05-29-2017, 10:24 PM
Thanks - I have a much better proofed version of the MS - should I include it in the email? (the new version has no glitches and has many mistakes sorted) or is attaching a new version of the MS he has a no-no? Also the agency reps misery memoir, and I've completed one - should I mention this book in the email.

Thanks so much for your feedback!

Turnip


I would assume you say exactly what happened. "I spoke with X and s/he said I should touch base in [time frame]."



I love this sentence - thanks!

mayqueen
05-29-2017, 10:31 PM
Thanks - I have a much better proofed version of the MS - should I include it in the email?

I would not. It gives the impression of being unprofessional. The first MS should have been proofed thoroughly.


Also the agency reps misery memoir, and I've completed one - should I mention this book in the email.

I also would not do this. Query one book at a time. Save mention of other manuscripts for the offer call.

Cyia
05-29-2017, 10:36 PM
What mayqueen said. Don't include anything in this email other than your nudge.

Turniphead2
05-29-2017, 11:14 PM
K thanks guys - I won't mention that. Should I mention I've had 2 other requests for fulls or leave that out as well?

DongerNeedFood
05-29-2017, 11:37 PM
K thanks guys - I won't mention that. Should I mention I've had 2 other requests for fulls or leave that out as well?


Do not mention that.

LuckyStar
05-30-2017, 12:15 AM
If you made changes to the story, you could send the updated version, stating that this is an updated version with changes. If you just corrected a few typos, that would not be necessary.
If the ms you sent originally was riddled with errors and typos instead of a few, you need to rethink the condition of the material you are sending out to be considered for representation.
No one is perfect, however, a ms in near flawless proofread condition is going to make it more attractive to an agent than one riddled with mistakes.

I am curious, why did you call the office and not ask to speak to the agent who 'd requested the full?

Anyway, ask in the email what it was you called for in the first place.

Yes, say you are checking in, touching base or whatever catches your fancy. Mention you spoke to so-and-so and whatever pertinent info so-and-so gave you.

Good Luck.

JulianneQJohnson
05-30-2017, 12:19 AM
I'd like to add a little gentle advice, and I mean it with the utmost respect, as we have all been where you have. You sound like you are in a hurry. You sent out the MS before it was it's shiny best, you called the agency before it was time to even email nudge, and you are already thinking about sending them another MS. Publishing isn't a quick business. Yes, it's very exciting when things start happening and you should be excited. Don't let that excitement turn into rushing the process. It can make you come off as unprofessional. Just my opinion, of course. Take it with a shaker of salt.

mistri
05-30-2017, 01:21 AM
He was very friendly and didn't seem to mind, and just said call his co-agent after 3 weeks. I think calling anyone in the UK after a week of no contact is fine: the question is, if I do nudge - what should I put in the email.


I'm in the UK - a week is no time at all. I used to work for an editor who would sit on manuscripts for a year, and still sometimes buy them at the end of that! Honestly, publishing moves slooooooooow. In general, nudge in the manner you last corresponded (ie email) after whatever date is indicated on their website. Probably at least a month.

Old Hack
05-30-2017, 10:31 AM
He was very friendly and didn't seem to mind, and just said call his co-agent after 3 weeks. I think calling anyone in the UK after a week of no contact is fine: the question is, if I do nudge - what should I put in the email.

PS thanks for your reply.

Turniphead

No, it really wasn't ok to phone the agency.

Do not call them again.

If I were you I'd leave it longer than the few weeks suggested before you email--I'd leave it at least two months, probably three. When you do email, just ask them if they have any news on your ms yet. That's all.


Thanks - I have a much better proofed version of the MS - should I include it in the email? (the new version has no glitches and has many mistakes sorted) or is attaching a new version of the MS he has a no-no?

No. They are reading your ms and won't want a new version of it, no matter how much better this new version is. Just leave them alone to read it and get back to you in their own time. (And next time, perhaps only send your work out once you have finished tweaking it.)


Also the agency reps misery memoir, and I've completed one - should I mention this book in the email.

No. Query one book at a time. If they offer you representation you can mention it at that time.


K thanks guys - I won't mention that. Should I mention I've had 2 other requests for fulls or leave that out as well?

Requests for fulls aren't worth mentioning. Offers of representation are.


I'd like to add a little gentle advice, and I mean it with the utmost respect, as we have all been where you have. You sound like you are in a hurry. You sent out the MS before it was it's shiny best, you called the agency before it was time to even email nudge, and you are already thinking about sending them another MS. Publishing isn't a quick business. Yes, it's very exciting when things start happening and you should be excited. Don't let that excitement turn into rushing the process. It can make you come off as unprofessional. Just my opinion, of course. Take it with a shaker of salt.

This is my feeling too. I know it's difficult, Turnip, but please just take a step back. Write your next book. Forget about this one for now. Let agents read it in their own time.

mccardey
05-30-2017, 10:59 AM
Don't hurry so much. You'll hate yourself later. Srsly - don't hurry. Move on to the next thing.

Turniphead2
05-30-2017, 03:22 PM
I'm really grateful for the feedback on this forum and the thoughtful responses. So TYVM.

I've decided not to contact the agent that has the full, until after 2 months.

My only concern in posting in the forums is that it seems there are a lot of US writers here. Which is great. But is the two month response to a full, a universal thing, or is it based on approaches in the US?

2 months sounds about right tho.
I did send a proofed version, but on a later read found proofing errors he'd missed. (doh! needs to find new editor)

I didn't rush an unproofed MS to the agent, but the proofer was inept.

I do need to learn patience.

I believe in my work but have the patience of a cheetah who's drank 12 Redbulls, some vodka and a load of speed.



Thanks again.

Turniphead

CameronJohnston
05-30-2017, 05:15 PM
Oof, no, don't ever phone them!

2 months is not a long wait at all if they have the Full. It's far more likely to be over 3 months and the generally suggested (or so I gather) 'nudge by date' is to do it after 3 months for both US and UK agents.

Old Hack
05-30-2017, 06:20 PM
I'm really grateful for the feedback on this forum and the thoughtful responses. So TYVM.

I've decided not to contact the agent that has the full, until after 2 months.

You're welcome! And you're doing the right thing in waiting.


My only concern in posting in the forums is that it seems there are a lot of US writers here. Which is great. But is the two month response to a full, a universal thing, or is it based on approaches in the US?


I live and work in the UK but have worked on US-UK coeditions, so have experience in both markets. Two months is good, three months is better.


I did send a proofed version, but on a later read found proofing errors he'd missed. (doh! needs to find new editor)

I didn't rush an unproofed MS to the agent, but the proofer was inept.


I don't think writers need to work with editors or proofreaders prior to submitting their work to agents. Agents want to see your work, not your work once it's been edited by someone else. Focus on getting your work as good as YOU can get it, and that should be enough.

Not only will this save you money, it will also protect you from having your work spoiled by an incompetent editor, which is a real risk.

That's not to say that editorial agencies etc. are not worth using: they can be great; but use them with discretion, and don't assume they're required.