PDA

View Full Version : Authors Looking to Review



kecargiulo
11-21-2016, 01:01 AM
I tried to look through this forum before posting, but I may have missed a similar thread. If there is one please let me know!

Long story short - my young adult fiction/fantasy novel Dancing with Fey came out back in September 2016 in print and digitally through all the usual channels - Amazon, B&N, etc. I have been submitting to reviewers and bloggers (of course all interested in the genre) with little to no luck. Could there be any authors on Absolute Write interested in reading and reviewing others works? Does anyone perhaps also run a book blog as well as being an author? Does anyone have any suggestions on a great resource for finding reviewers?

Thank you in advance!

Justin K
11-22-2016, 09:31 AM
Hello K. Elizabeth,

This forum doesn't really have a thread for completed works to be reviewed, perhaps the beta reader/writing buddy section, but I'm sure some folks will see your post here and reach out. In my limited experience, I find that most reputable reviewers will glance over direct solicitation from authors (typically self-published) because they associate it with lower quality work, and their inboxes are flooded with requests that don't benefit their platform. But I think a lot rests on how you reach out to them, and how you present your work.

With an absolutely astonishing cover and a concise blurb, and an email that's worded as if they're the ones who need you and not the other way around, there's success to be had with some of the smaller reviewers, or even people that are an aspiring blogger/booktuber and just starting out. For the big names, they're used to doing sponsored reviews with monthly ARC's from big name publishers, but I'd bet the rights to my work that for the right price they would give you the time of day as well. - The right price for a lot of people is just a physical copy of your work; everyone loves a free book (physical copy). I've had success reaching out to the smaller booktubers. Twitter might be a resource as well because a lot of bloggers follow authors in your genre, and you can find their accounts easily. Good luck and hang in there!

AW Admin
11-22-2016, 09:33 AM
I tried to look through this forum before posting, but I may have missed a similar thread. If there is one please let me know!

Long story short - my young adult fiction/fantasy novel Dancing with Fey came out back in September 2016 in print and digitally through all the usual channels - Amazon, B&N, etc. I have been submitting to reviewers and bloggers (of course all interested in the genre) with little to no luck. Could there be any authors on Absolute Write interested in reading and reviewing others works? Does anyone perhaps also run a book blog as well as being an author? Does anyone have any suggestions on a great resource for finding reviewers?

Thank you in advance!

Offer a giveaway for Goodreads and Amazon and LibraryThing.

See this: On Hosting Book Giveaways (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?323529-On-Hosting-Book-Giveaways)

WriterBN
11-22-2016, 09:25 PM
Offer a giveaway for Goodreads and Amazon and LibraryThing.

See this: On Hosting Book Giveaways (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?323529-On-Hosting-Book-Giveaways)

...but don't expect the winners to review the book, at least on Goodreads and Amazon.

As far as getting reviews, there are some groups on Goodreads specifically for that purpose. The best one I've found is called Making Connections, although it's heavily populated by romance readers.

Marian Perera
11-23-2016, 11:23 PM
...but don't expect the winners to review the book, at least on Goodreads and Amazon.

I've done four giveaways on LibraryThing and to the best of my knowledge, haven't received a single review as a result.

romance2die4
11-24-2016, 12:09 AM
Twitter might be a resource as well because a lot of bloggers follow authors in your genre, and you can find their accounts easily. Good luck and hang in there!

Once you identify the bloggers in your genre on Twitter what do you do? Wouldn't you go to their website and contact them from there. Are you using Twitter just to identify who they are?

I don't think LibraryThing will take self published books. At least that is what they say on their website. Goodreads giveaways can only be physical books.

Marissa D
11-24-2016, 12:16 AM
LibraryThing will do giveaways of self - published books through the Member Giveaway program, not through Early Reviewers. Unfortunately the review rate going through Member Giveaway is almost zero.

Justin K
11-25-2016, 09:27 AM
Once you identify the bloggers in your genre on Twitter what do you do? Wouldn't you go to their website and contact them from there. Are you using Twitter just to identify who they are?


Yes. The way twitter organizes followers and gives suggestions on who to follow makes it very easy to find a lot of bloggers who may otherwise be difficult to locate. I would only contact through their business email however, after researching them on their social media.

kecargiulo
11-27-2016, 11:37 PM
Thank you to everyone for your replies! I will definitely be checking out the Goodreads groups to see if I can find any willing reviewers on there! I am not that familiar with Twitter. I made a Twitter account because of the recommendation of the publisher, but I am much more familiar with Facebook and Instagram. I will have to look into Twitter more.

To answer some questions:

1) I am not self published. I was published through a small press, which is why I am doing a lot of the leg work.

2) I have not been using Twitter to identify bloggers. I have been going off a YA Fiction book bloggers list and doing several submissions a week. I also have been finding some by word of mouth through other authors Facebook, Instagram, and message boards. Once I identify the blogger or reviewer I follow the directions usually listed on their review policy page for submissions. The instructions are usually the same as querying for publishers was - send a query letter, blurb, and now publishing details with a link to your website. I always offer a complimentary copy of my book.

Komic Brew
12-09-2016, 03:34 AM
Hello Justin, any idea about the prices that are practiced to get a review from a well respected blogger, when it's not a physical copy of the book? Thanks!


Hello K. Elizabeth,

This forum doesn't really have a thread for completed works to be reviewed, perhaps the beta reader/writing buddy section, but I'm sure some folks will see your post here and reach out. In my limited experience, I find that most reputable reviewers will glance over direct solicitation from authors (typically self-published) because they associate it with lower quality work, and their inboxes are flooded with requests that don't benefit their platform. But I think a lot rests on how you reach out to them, and how you present your work.

With an absolutely astonishing cover and a concise blurb, and an email that's worded as if they're the ones who need you and not the other way around, there's success to be had with some of the smaller reviewers, or even people that are an aspiring blogger/booktuber and just starting out. For the big names, they're used to doing sponsored reviews with monthly ARC's from big name publishers, but I'd bet the rights to my work that for the right price they would give you the time of day as well. - The right price for a lot of people is just a physical copy of your work; everyone loves a free book (physical copy). I've had success reaching out to the smaller booktubers. Twitter might be a resource as well because a lot of bloggers follow authors in your genre, and you can find their accounts easily. Good luck and hang in there!

R.Barrows
12-09-2016, 03:52 AM
10 bucks on Kindle. It seems kind of high. Just wondering. I mean, I was about to put one of my novels out on Amazon and I was hoping to go cheap. You know, around 3 bucks. Partially because I'm Indie and also because I think my story is worth 3 bucks. Yeah, it's good, IMHO, but it's only going to appeal to a male SF audience, and that's a small target of e-readers.

Did Amazon insist on 10 bucks for an ebook? It doesn't seem right. Let me explain. I read ebooks. And I'm fussy. I'm also on a budget. If I come across a book for 10 bucks, I'm going to talk to people I know who also read. These people have a bigger budget than I do. They read a lot of stuff I can't afford. If they recommend it, maybe I'll spring, but only if I can't find something else that looks good and is cheaper. I check Goodreads and the Amazon reviews and I talk to humans that read. A good example would be 'The Girl with All the Gifts.' I didn't want to pay the asking price, but after a friend told me it was worth a read and looking at the reviews, I paid the 10 bucks. Now, if it had been 5 bucks, I'd have bought it without my friend's recommendation.

Something to think about. I spend around 100 bucks a year on ebooks. That's my budget, so I'm picky. I do not feel that 'The Girl with All the Gifts' was worth 10 bucks. I would say 7. Just me saying. It was a good book. It was fun. It kept me entertained. But I think 10 was too high.

Justin K
12-09-2016, 07:34 AM
Hello Justin, any idea about the prices that are practiced to get a review from a well respected blogger, when it's not a physical copy of the book? Thanks!

There isn't much information available on this, but you might want to watch this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OYa8bJkad-w&t=646s). Very enlightening, she does a segment on what publishers are offering to have books reviewed, or just promoted. They earn higher amounts depending on how many followers they have. But one thing to keep in mind is that reviewers like her are signing contracts with publishers, and that works as a safety net for them against the ramifications of working directly with authors, where things could get ugly. Either way, from what I've seen, most bloggers don't want a book unless it's a physical copy, although some do prefer the kindle version.

Old Hack
12-09-2016, 06:34 PM
I've just checked with a few publicists I know, who work for reputable trade publishers: not one of them pays bloggers anything to review the books they work on, and none of them know of any publishers which have signed contracts with book bloggers in order to get reviews. Am I correct to assume that this is a self-publishing thing?

WriterBN
12-09-2016, 08:58 PM
I've just checked with a few publicists I know, who work for reputable trade publishers: not one of them pays bloggers anything to review the books they work on, and none of them know of any publishers which have signed contracts with book bloggers in order to get reviews. Am I correct to assume that this is a self-publishing thing?

No, it's not a self-publishing thing (or it shouldn't be, anyway). Paying for reviews is strictly against the Amazon TOS, and it could get your account shut down.

Old Hack
12-10-2016, 12:15 AM
No, it's not a self-publishing thing (or it shouldn't be, anyway). Paying for reviews is strictly against the Amazon TOS, and it could get your account shut down.

Yep, I knew that; and I know that it's unethical to pay for reviews, for all the reasons we've discussed here in the past. But this post suggested it's pretty common for publishers to pay for reviews:


There isn't much information available on this, but you might want to watch this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OYa8bJkad-w&t=646s). Very enlightening, she does a segment on what publishers are offering to have books reviewed, or just promoted. They earn higher amounts depending on how many followers they have. But one thing to keep in mind is that reviewers like her are signing contracts with publishers, and that works as a safety net for them against the ramifications of working directly with authors, where things could get ugly. Either way, from what I've seen, most bloggers don't want a book unless it's a physical copy, although some do prefer the kindle version.

As I can't watch the link provided thanks to my unreliable internet, I wondered who these publishers are who are paying for promotion and reviews, and are even offering contracts to reviewers.

Justin K
12-10-2016, 08:15 AM
As I can't watch the link provided thanks to my unreliable internet, I wondered who these publishers are who are paying for promotion and reviews, and are even offering contracts to reviewers.

Hi everyone. I just wanted to clear up that I wasn't talking about amazon or goodreads reviews (the kind involving stars), I meant the kind that appear on blogs or on booktube vlogs. The reviewers will usually say something along the lines of "this was sponsored by _fill in the blank_," before or after talking about a book to let the viewers know that the promotion was sponsored. And generally, they're always naming the larger publishers. The video I posted is from a popular blogger (one of many on youtube) who says that they do accept payments for unbiased reviews. I don't think there's a reason not to trust what she says.

This, for example, is a review of Carve the Mark from Sasha Alsberg, which she says up front is sponsored by Harper Collins. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALSCDDO535s

Old Hack
12-10-2016, 12:15 PM
I can't watch YouTube links, so don't know what is or isn't said on that link. But my understanding is that the reviews receive free copies of the books--ARCs, advance readers' copies--and that's all. No payment changes hands. Is this not so? Do the reviewers receive payment as well?

Justin K
12-10-2016, 01:03 PM
I can't watch YouTube links, so don't know what is or isn't said on that link. But my understanding is that the reviews receive free copies of the books--ARCs, advance readers' copies--and that's all. No payment changes hands. Is this not so? Do the reviewers receive payment as well?

Unfortunately, I can say with confidence that that is not so. Publishers, apparently, do offer 'sponsored review contracts' (involving money) to vloggers with large followings for honest reviews of their books, or even for just doing a 'book haul'. My guess is that they pay to be featured in the 'wrap up's' and 'to be read' lists that are often talked about as well. I don't know if there's a third party involved or not, but the money is there for sure, and it comes from the publisher.

Komic Brew
12-10-2016, 05:54 PM
thank you Justin for the link. Very enlightening info there.

Old Hack
12-10-2016, 07:49 PM
Unfortunately, I can say with confidence that that is not so. Publishers, apparently, do offer 'sponsored review contracts' (involving money) to vloggers with large followings for honest reviews of their books, or even for just doing a 'book haul'. My guess is that they pay to be featured in the 'wrap up's' and 'to be read' lists that are often talked about as well. I don't know if there's a third party involved or not, but the money is there for sure, and it comes from the publisher.

I've just asked three publishing publicists I know who work in the US if they pay reviewers like this, or offer such contracts, and they all denied that it was happening at the publishers they've worked for.

Justin K
12-11-2016, 01:05 AM
I've just asked three publishing publicists I know who work in the US if they pay reviewers like this, or offer such contracts, and they all denied that it was happening at the publishers they've worked for.

Perhaps it could be only a select few publishers that do this, or it's a new thing, or the publicists are unaware? I wonder if anyone will chime in with some more information about it.

I don't really know what goes on behind the scenes, but all of these popular book vloggers make weekly videos featuring books they receive from publishers, and they give a disclaimer that the reviews are sponsored. A lot of the reviews sound somewhat scripted too. That vlogger in particular, Emma, was sort of the first one to talk about it on her channel, and she does mention amounts of money being paid and contracts being signed to review or promote books.

Come to think of it, I recall a certain tv show from my childhood by the name of Reading Rainbow that seemed to follow this exact formula, followed by a jingle. I don't think anything new is going on.

It's interesting that there isn't more backlash from the community about biased reviews (there is some), because the reviews are hardly ever negative, and even when they are, they still give the book 3 or 4 stars on Goodreads.

Old Hack
12-11-2016, 12:01 PM
Perhaps it could be only a select few publishers that do this, or it's a new thing, or the publicists are unaware? I wonder if anyone will chime in with some more information about it.

I'm at a disadvantage to you because I've not viewed the YouTube thing, so don't know exactly what was said, remember, so forgive me if I ask what seem like obvious questions.

If it were happening at the publishers my friends work for, they would know about it: they are in charge of their departments, and control the budgets.

I am interested in which publishers are doing this--if they're doing it at all. It could be a misunderstanding at some point, or it could be smoke-and-mirrors on behalf of the vloggers. I don't know. I'll see what I can find out.


I don't really know what goes on behind the scenes, but all of these popular book vloggers make weekly videos featuring books they receive from publishers, and they give a disclaimer that the reviews are sponsored. A lot of the reviews sound somewhat scripted too. That vlogger in particular, Emma, was sort of the first one to talk about it on her channel, and she does mention amounts of money being paid and contracts being signed to review or promote books.

I know reviewers have to make it clear if they receive books for review without having paid for them. And I've seen some book bloggers refer to that as being "sponsored" by the publisher: it seemed they were trying to big themselves up in order to gain status as a reviewer, and to get more free books from other publishers. But a few free review copies is not the same thing as sponsorship, though, as you and I both know.

Your comment that she states money is paid and contracts are signed suggests it's more than just free review copies going on here, and that's what I'm finding peculiar. Because no one I've spoken to has said this is going on, and most have gone on to say they just wouldn't do it: there are too many conflicts of interest inherent in such a plan.


Come to think of it, I recall a certain tv show from my childhood by the name of Reading Rainbow that seemed to follow this exact formula, followed by a jingle. I don't think anything new is going on.

Laws regarding advertising have changed--in the UK, at least. Now companies are allowed to sponsor TV programs but they're not allowed to use those programs to advertise their products: all they get is a quick ten-second trailer at the start of each segment of the show, which is clearly an ad.


It's interesting that there isn't more backlash from the community about biased reviews (there is some), because the reviews are hardly ever negative, and even when they are, they still give the book 3 or 4 stars on Goodreads.

I'm surprised there isn't more backlash. And I'm surprised Goodreads allows such ads. Amazon doesn't.

Fuchsia Groan
12-13-2016, 05:09 AM
Hmmm. I just watched the video. The Booktuber in question definitely says money changes hands. She names a specific amount she received for a video: $150. She says in her experience a couple hundred is typical, and people who think Booktubers receive thousands of dollars per video are way off.

She also reads from a "sponsored video contract" she says she received from a "company" (publisher? PR company?). It stipulates that the company has the right to edit her ("the influencer's") video, but only to remove factual errors and spoilers, not to censor her opinion.

To me as a reviewer and author, this is surprising. I know of authors who have paid for Booktubers' coverage independently of their publishers. I don't have experience with publishers doing this. My guess is, if this indeed happens, it's a phenomenon of the YA realm, where Booktubers hold a great deal of sway.

Justin K
12-13-2016, 07:07 AM
If it's indeed coming from the publisher, they're probably logging that money as just typical advertising. - That's basically what these popular booktube channels have become, and they're not really trying to hide it. Their content often appears more like a commercial than a review, and a large portion of the books are promoted without having been read. I'm sure they do have quite a bit of influence, especially for the popular books targeted towards younger readers.

I personally don't mind seeing a review if I know it's been paid for (Kirkus, for instance. Aren't they a paid review site that publishers utilize?). The thing that makes booktube an evolving monster is that they review those same books on other social media where things are not as transparent.

Fuchsia Groan
12-13-2016, 07:46 AM
Self-published authors pay for Kirkus reviews. Publishers don't. Those are two completely separate categories of review, IIRC. (Publishers also don't have the option of suppressing negative reviews, of which Kirkus offers quite a few!)

As a reviewer, I feel pretty adamantly that an ARC and a cash payment are different and I wouldn't accept the latter. I can't speak specifically to the integrity of Booktubers, though, and I know that unlike me, they don't have an employer paying for their labor.

Justin K
12-13-2016, 08:56 AM
I agree with that. I think the money exchanging hands, assuming it exists, wherever it may be from, is the result of book vloggers receiving endless stacks of ARC's so vast that nothing being sent their way actually stands out in the crowd or gets talked about for very long- and so someone decides to buy extra 'air time' on their channels.

Old Hack
12-13-2016, 11:18 AM
Self-published authors pay for Kirkus reviews. Publishers don't. Those are two completely separate categories of review, IIRC. (Publishers also don't have the option of suppressing negative reviews, of which Kirkus offers quite a few!)

That's right. Publishers don't pay, and it's these reviews which influence various stages of the book trade, such as book buyers at retail outlets, and librarians with budgets. Self publishers can submit for a paid-for review, but those paid-for reviews appear in a different publication which buyers etc. don't really bother with, so they don't have the same impact on sales that the free reviews have.


Hmmm. I just watched the video. The Booktuber in question definitely says money changes hands. She names a specific amount she received for a video: $150. She says in her experience a couple hundred is typical, and people who think Booktubers receive thousands of dollars per video are way off.

She also reads from a "sponsored video contract" she says she received from a "company" (publisher? PR company?). It stipulates that the company has the right to edit her ("the influencer's") video, but only to remove factual errors and spoilers, not to censor her opinion.

To me as a reviewer and author, this is surprising. I know of authors who have paid for Booktubers' coverage independently of their publishers. I don't have experience with publishers doing this. My guess is, if this indeed happens, it's a phenomenon of the YA realm, where Booktubers hold a great deal of sway.

It's surprising to me too. But I note from your comment that the Booktuber doesn't say she's paid by the publisher, which is what's been assumed in this thread. And adding that to the comments I received from my publishing PR friends, I am becoming more skeptical that it's trade publishers paying for these reviews. I'll see if I can find out more.

MiloMilo
12-14-2016, 12:14 AM
From what I've heard, these fees are paid by author-hired publicists. So the book is at St. Martin's or Dutton or whatever, but the PR budget and activity is independent of the company.

Old Hack
12-14-2016, 12:29 AM
From what I've heard, these fees are paid by author-hired publicists. So the book is at St. Martin's or Dutton or whatever, but the PR budget and activity is independent of the company.

I wondered if that might be the case. But upthread, people specified that publishers were paying.

Fallen
12-14-2016, 01:49 AM
I wondered if that might be the case. But upthread, people specified that publishers were paying.

It's an interesting video.... The quote from the video on sponsored videos from publishers is:

"Generally... this is something that the publisher invites you to do. They'll ask you to film some kind of video that centers around this new release, whether that means filming a full review for the book, or doing a tag or a video inspired by that release... they've always sent me a copy of the book to the hold in the video and then also offered me some kind of monetary compensation for just creating the video. You'll sign a contract, you get a book, you film a video, you'll post it, you'll get paid... but the publishers have no say in what you post." But -- she goes on to read from a contract to her from a publisher, and here it states the publisher retains the right to edit any factual information that may not be right, or spoilers that reveal the ending etc, but not cut her style or her opinion. Sometimes it does look like a general promo post that the reviewer does: Author, title, blurb (brief mention), sometimes a review.

I've never heard about this before. I've seen book bloggers (non-youtube) come in and say they have to send publishers copies of reviews for them to decide on whether that reviewing company is experienced and the right fit for the publisher to regularly send review copies, but sponsoring on youtube? *Scratches head*

Something new I've noticed on authors and reviews is that one or two who have arc teams will offer gift voucher giveaways once the reviews are posted on Amazon etc. I saw one author go from 0 to 65 reviews in a few days. I don't think I could sleep comfortably knowing money at any stage had been offered.

Fuchsia Groan
12-14-2016, 04:14 AM
Thank you for asking around about this, Old Hack! I'm interested to know what you turn up.


I wondered if that might be the case. But upthread, people specified that publishers were paying.

I think the videos do sometimes come with tags like "sponsored by Harper Collins," which then also appear in the vloggers' Goodreads reviews. But I don't know as much about BookTube as I should. I only found out about this because there were criticisms on Twitter of the content of reviews of a certain highly hyped YA book, which, IIRC, led to the BookTuber making her video to explain how sponsorship works.

I have heard of trade-published authors creating review incentives, such as posting bonus content once they get a particular number of reviews. But I think there's an increasing concern that even this could get an author in trouble with Amazon. I have run giveaways and sent off the books with a note saying that, while I don't expect a review as a quid pro quo, I'd certainly be happy to have one. So far it hasn't netted me any reviews. Most of them came early via NetGalley and a blog tour that the bloggers kindly ran for free.

Justin K
12-14-2016, 05:55 AM
I noticed she had replied to almost every question on her video, and she was kind enough to answer ours, just for the record:

Emma, I was curious, do the paid sponsorships come directly from the publishers? Or are they coming from author-hired publicists / 3rd party marketers working on behalf of the publishers? When someone says 'sponsored by HarperCollins', is there another entity involved between them and the Booktuber?

Justin sometimes!!! It depends but even if you are being contacted by a company that's hired by the publisher, the sponsorship (books, materials, the actual payment) is still from the publishers, so the sponsor is the publisher. It can really be either!

For anyone not familiar with the booktube community, it's really a small group of around 10 to 20 book vloggers who have sponsored content (their followers ranging in amounts from about 10k to 300k), and probably a few hundred more without as much influence. It's a different realm than written blog reviews, but there is overlap on social media, and their opinions on books are consistent across the board.

Old Hack
12-14-2016, 11:20 AM
Emma, I was curious, do the paid sponsorships come directly from the publishers? Or are they coming from author-hired publicists / 3rd party marketers working on behalf of the publishers? When someone says 'sponsored by HarperCollins', is there another entity involved between them and the Booktuber?

Justin sometimes!!! It depends but even if you are being contacted by a company that's hired by the publisher, the sponsorship (books, materials, the actual payment) is still from the publishers, so the sponsor is the publisher. It can really be either!

My bold.

Doesn't this suggest that the sponsorship they receive can come in the form of books? In which case, it's just being given the books to review. I do a lot of sewing, and some of the blogs I read about that are sponsored by fabric companies etc which provide the materials to make the pretty things featured, which is the same.

Of course, it could be that the reviewers are given money by publishers; and they could get round the "don't pay for reviews" thing by paying for other things.

I've asked a few people about this now: marketing and publicity people in the US and UK, both employed by publishers and freelancers. Not one of them knows about paying for reviews in the way this suggests, so I'm not getting anywhere--yet--in finding out more.

Justin K
01-20-2017, 03:37 PM
So I'd like to re-ignite this thread with a recent happening pertaining to sponsored reviews organized by big name publishers. And this is the first time I've heard of something like this, but I was waiting for it to happen, and it's worth knowing about.

Basically, upon hearing that Veronica Roth's 'Carve the Mark' would be given an unfavorable review by Booktuber Riley Marie (who was taking part in a sponsored review campaign), Harper decided to cut their partnership with her. Now in addition to claims that the book is racist, Harper is undoubtedly going to get burned for trying to disregard that review, and for sponsoring only positive reviews.

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1789138449

RaiscaraAvalon
01-20-2017, 04:53 PM
Just wanted to chime in and say that I'm open to reviews. Just need a copy of the book, but I don't accept cash - though I do take donations. ;) But no matter what, my reviews are honest and mine alone - though I admit to probably liking more books than I should, I'm a voracious reader of all genres. Hell, any book I can get my hands on works. I've recently started my book blog over as it was time for a change, and I was paying too much for very little service.

I've heard of publishers paying reviewers, but that was more in regards to reviewing being more or less a full time job rather than paying for reviews. I've never been offered payment for a review by a publisher, at least not yet.

Polenth
01-21-2017, 10:36 PM
I've heard of publishers paying reviewers, but that was more in regards to reviewing being more or less a full time job rather than paying for reviews. I've never been offered payment for a review by a publisher, at least not yet.

It's unlikely to happen if you're a book blogger, as the standard for written reviews is a copy of the book. Blogs are more likely to make money through things like affiliate schemes and unconnected advertising. This is how I make money from my blog.

It's people making videos who are getting paid directly for their reviews. The current situation shows the issue with that, as there's always going to be the worry that a bad review means the money will stop. Which is exactly what happened the moment the review went from "I liked it with a few criticisms" to "Wow, this book was offensive". People making videos about books can't be too negative if they want to be paid.