PDA

View Full Version : I'm through/thru with it!



elzoria
05-01-2006, 12:41 PM
Which is appropriate?

I went through the door.

or

I went thru the door.

I get so hung up on this one.

Sandi LeFaucheur
05-01-2006, 01:33 PM
There is no such word as "thru"! Or nite. Or brite. Or any of those other horrible short-forms invented by advertisers. Therefore, the correct spelling is "through".

aruna
05-01-2006, 02:34 PM
There is no such word as "thru"! Or nite. Or brite. Or any of those other horrible short-forms invented by advertisers. Therefore, the correct spelling is "through".

Absolutely.

CaroGirl
05-01-2006, 04:14 PM
Perhaps your actually hung up on the word "threw", which is the past tense of "throw".

He threw the ball and ran.
He went through the door.

And, yes, there's no such word as thru.

Julie Worth
05-01-2006, 04:29 PM
Thru is logical, it's efficient, it's fine for informal emails, but it's one of those things that will brand you as an amateur if you use it in your writing.

Jamesaritchie
05-01-2006, 05:36 PM
Thru is logical, it's efficient, it's fine for informal emails, but it's one of those things that will brand you as an amateur if you use it in your writing.





When someone sends me an e-mail with "thru" in it, informal or not, it gets deleted the moment I hit the "word" thru. It's neither logical nor efficient, it's illiterate and ignorant, and people who use it in any e-mail are doing no more than spreadng illiteracy and ignorance by validating something a third grader should know not to use.

reph
05-01-2006, 11:33 PM
When someone sends me an e-mail with "thru" in it, informal or not, it gets deleted the moment I hit the "word" thru.Good move. Such an act of discernment should be rewarded with a dozen donuts.

rich
05-01-2006, 11:39 PM
Admittedly, I do use "through," but I'd much prefer "thru." I've gotten used to using "through," but in my deepest of thoughts I keep thinking "truff" and "troje." No big deal, though (or tho)


Just me.

veinglory
05-02-2006, 12:21 AM
Thru is like 'Cuz' -- one of those words that makes me fear the writer os a txt-writer. It may be the more logical word but one needs to be able to use conventional language when required. Thru is the sweat pants, through is anything you wear outside the house.

rich
05-02-2006, 12:39 AM
Ah, but you pick a bad example. "cuz" may feel to you more natural, but not throughout the English speaking world. "Because" has no emotional baggage; it waves phonetically, and gets in nobody's way.

Ah, if only Willy had penned, "What lite thru yonder window breaks?"

A consummation devoutly to be wished.

Maryn
05-02-2006, 02:20 AM
There is no such word as "thru"! Or nite. Or brite. Or any of those other horrible short-forms invented by advertisers. Therefore, the correct spelling is "through".Oh, dear, some hearts are going to be broken by this news. Please don't reveal this to these folks (http://www.nysthruway.gov/index.shtml), who may be in some substantial part to blame for popularizing "thru."

Maryn, who's got an E-Z Pass (although those probably don't exist, either)

Sage
05-02-2006, 02:24 AM
I tend to type "thru," but knowing that, I have it on autocorrect in Word.

Sandi LeFaucheur
05-02-2006, 02:42 AM
Ah, Maryn...just because a government says thruway, it doesn't make it right. I'd say "thruway" is sort of slang, like "donut". And as for E-Z pass...Hmmm....what's an E-Zed pass anyway? http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/icons/icon7.gif

In the context of New York Thruway, I find it more acceptable, because that is a proper (if grammatically improper) name. But in writing? No way! Stick to the standard form. Although language is dynamic and we don't speak or write the same way that good old Willy Shakes did, standards must be maintained. By this cantankerous old English bird, anyway! Or before long, we'll all be writing L8 for late. Ack.

maestrowork
05-02-2006, 02:50 AM
Which is appropriate?

I went through the door.

or

I went thru the door.

I get so hung up on this one.

Check your dictionary. "Thru" is not even a real word.

rich
05-02-2006, 03:00 AM
Not even a real word in the dictionary, Maestro? Had I known that I would not have made such a fool of myself.

Fern
05-02-2006, 03:29 AM
Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary shows thru as a variant of through when you type thru in the search block.

However, when you pull up "through", it doesn't show "thru".

What's up with that?

I dislike seeing it written as "thru", also. Way back when I was learning how to spell it certainly wasn't considered a word.

rich
05-02-2006, 03:34 AM
When in the course of human events, break the rules when you know the rules. Your writing will improve.

dragonjax
05-02-2006, 03:41 AM
Lazy spelling bugs me -- especially in emails. I have very little patience for it in actual books.

Teddy Roosevelt tried to change certain American English spellings -- if he would have succeeded, perhaps we'd have thru and site and CUL8R -- yano? But it never happened...

rich
05-02-2006, 03:50 AM
What the hell is CUL8R? And what's yano?

reph
05-02-2006, 03:54 AM
1. "See you later."

2. "You know."

rich
05-02-2006, 04:06 AM
I wouldn't let my dogs talk like that. Although, number two makes some sense wordwise--except for the grating more acceptable words, you know?

maestrowork
05-02-2006, 05:48 AM
Not even a real word in the dictionary, Maestro? Had I known that I would not have made such a fool of myself.

That reminds me of a scene in Akeelah and the Bee, when Akeelah used the word "dissed" in a sentence, and Professor Larabee (Laurence Fishburne) told her, "What did I say about using words only found in the dictionary?"

She turned around and flipped through the dictionary, read the definition in it, then said, "New words get added to the dictionary all the time."

My thought was: Smart a$$.

Same sentiment, here.

(remember, respect your fellow members. You could have simply pointed out my mistake without being rude. You should have known better than that)

dragonjax
05-02-2006, 06:34 AM
I wouldn't let my dogs talk like that. Although, number two makes some sense wordwise--except for the grating more acceptable words, you know?

If my dogs talked, I'd be rich. And if they spelled, I'd overlook a few typos...

reph
05-02-2006, 08:04 AM
(remember, respect your fellow members. You could have simply pointed out my mistake without being rude. You should have known better than that)Ray, all I saw was that someone reported finding "thru" in a dictionary.

elzoria
05-02-2006, 12:13 PM
Thanks for the replies. I didn't know through/thru made such a big deal, but apparently it does.

I looked up thru and it is an informal version of through. I usually use through, but I often wondered why I see thru so much.

janetbellinger
05-02-2006, 02:39 PM
Thanks for the replies. I didn't know through/thru made such a big deal, but apparently it does.

I looked up thru and it is an informal version of through. I usually use through, but I often wondered why I see thru so much.

Don't know. Perhaps because the English language is always in the process of change. Maybe one day it will be thru which is shown in the dictionary and through an archaic form. The point is though that this hasn't happened yet and thru is presently slang, and unless you get the right audience, it's bound to annoy people.

aruna
05-02-2006, 02:52 PM
The point is though that this hasn't happened yet and thru is presently slang, and unless you get the right audience, it's bound to annoy people.

And once again, it's just American slang. U don't get thru here in the UK, except in teenage txt mssgs.

oarsman
05-02-2006, 03:58 PM
I've seen the frequent use of "thru" in technical writing when referring to a series. (For example: "12/12/2005 thru 12/30/2005","904 thru 909") I think it might come from the overuse of acronyms and similar shortcuts in technical text.