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ML-Larson
09-08-2016, 08:13 AM
Specifically, Korean.

Googled:

Breakdown of speech patterns in Korean Americans
Speech patterns in Asian Americans
Speech patterns asian immigrants
(and many variations thereof)

So, I'm looking for something oddly specific, and my google-fu is failing me. Character has been in America for about thirty years, so his English is pretty solid. But I know from my Portuguese inlaws that sometimes solid can still be a little funny. So I'm mostly looking for common speech patterns and tics that might develop over time and just stick around as bad habits.

Basically, looking for a character quirk, rather than some variant of cod Chinese.

Snitchcat
09-08-2016, 09:28 AM
Why does a request for information on SE Asia, or any countries on / around the Asian continent end with "some variant of Chinese"? There are over 40 nationalities on the continent itself. And over 10 in the SE Asian area.

SE Asia contains such a diverse set of languages, that "common speech patterns and tics" are only common to that particular language. It's not "common" to "SE Asia".

I would recommend selecting a nationality / language and understanding how sentences are constructed in that language.

I also strongly suggest that more research is done on the nationalities that are part of SE Asia -- there are approximately 12 that would be considered directly in SE Asia. Note that while China expands into this area, too, it is not the only nation in the region. Each nation in SE Asia has its own language, idiosyncrasies, sentence construction & patterns, expressions, idioms, beliefs, etc. These and many more factors influence their official spoken languages. Which says nothing of the dialects.

Btw, what is "cod Chinese"? Because whatever it is, it's offensive to read; please don't use it again.

ML-Larson
09-08-2016, 09:43 AM
Why does a request for information on SE Asia, or any countries on / around the Asian continent end with "some variant of Chinese"? There are over 40 nationalities on the continent itself. And over 10 in the SE Asian area.

Btw, what is "cod Chinese"? Because whatever it is, it's offensive to read; please don't use it again.


Cod Chinese is is exactly what I don't want, and ironically, and the very thing you are tearing into me about in the first paragraph. It's the name for the kind of catch-all, not-actually-Asian-at-all kind of languange and vernacular that gets thrown around. Cod just means comically false.

I said in the OP I am looking specifically for speech patterns that might be typical of a Korean immigrant, but have tried broader searches since mine were yielding some really irrelevant results. I know SE Asia is big, both geographically and demographically. I get this is a knee-jerk topic, but I don't appreciate having the subject and the very last line of my post read, and then being torn into for searching for the exact opposite of the thing I'm actually searching for. Thanks for that.

mccardey
09-08-2016, 10:20 AM
Have you had a look in the International Thread to see if we have some Koreans? Let me know if you can't find it.

ETA: Here you go - this isn't a huge thread (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?205700-Korea), but the last few entries might give you some people to ask. Even if they're not native Korean-speakers, they might know some of the verbal tics, or be able to point you somewhere.

chompers
09-08-2016, 02:26 PM
A lot of Asians end every sentence like a question? Especially Koreans, I've noticed?

Chris P
09-08-2016, 03:19 PM
A lot of Asians end every sentence like a question? Especially Koreans, I've noticed?

I notice this more with Australians, actually, usually when they are explaining things. The question sound seems to connote a "Do you understand?"

As for Koreans, I coached fellow grad students on pronunciation back in gead school. The th sound comes out as an "ess" and the z comes out as a j. One friend was shopping for electronics and asked me if "Jeness" was a good brand. I had never heard of it but he finally wrote it out: Zenith. He hadn't been in the US for as long aas your character, but as you mentioned some speech patterns are hard to break. If I moved to Mexico I could be there 50 years and still never roll my r.

Snitchcat
09-08-2016, 04:36 PM
Cod Chinese is is exactly what I don't want, and ironically, and the very thing you are tearing into me about in the first paragraph. It's the name for the kind of catch-all, not-actually-Asian-at-all kind of languange and vernacular that gets thrown around. Cod just means comically false.

So, again, Chinese is the go to language to make fun of?


I said in the OP I am looking specifically for speech patterns that might be typical of a Korean immigrant, but have tried broader searches since mine were yielding some really irrelevant results. I know SE Asia is big, both geographically and demographically. I get this is a knee-jerk topic, but I don't appreciate having the subject and the very last line of my post read, and then being torn into for searching for the exact opposite of the thing I'm actually searching for. Thanks for that.

I apologise for not seeing the "specifically Korean" part of your message.

However, I will Never apologise for calling out racist slurs and insults. So thank You for the insult!

ETA:
SE Asia is big. But see below for where Korea is. Not SE Asia.

Helix
09-08-2016, 04:43 PM
I'm curious about Korea being in SE Asia.

King Neptune
09-08-2016, 05:07 PM
I'm curious about Korea being in SE Asia.

I was also wondering when it moved there, also.

draosz
09-08-2016, 09:30 PM
A lot of Asians end every sentence like a question? Especially Koreans, I've noticed?

It's called high rising terminal (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_rising_terminal) or "upspeak". I notice it in modern American English and I find it grating.

Cath
09-09-2016, 12:12 AM
Tread very carefully here please. Err on the side of respect and don't make me close the thread.