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Lillith1991
06-23-2016, 04:06 PM
I've recently realized that I suck at keeping a schedule, organizing in general, or doing something like Don't Break The Chain. But I do like the to-do list and enjoy setting goals. So, next month, I've decided to try the decidedly flexible organization method called the bullet journal.

As for my routine, I'm looking into creating something flexible that also plays into my needs. I'm hoping to solidify that next month too. So far I've learned that I need my version of a morning paper (Reading a blog post from the various blogs I follow, news article etc.) and coffee (I sub the coffee for tea most of the time), and I like doing things like watering our garden and taking the potted plants out of the garage to get some sun and watering them too before breakfast and my second "coffee." But I don't really have a nighttime ritual that works and helps me to wind down or any other type of routine yet.

So, now that you've listened to me blabber for far too long, let's talk about the ways we keep our lives organized and the routines and rituals that keep us on an even keel. Do you like traditional planners, to-do list, bullet journals, mini calendars etc.? Do you plan meals so that you don't have to think about them as much? Do you have a morning or nighttime routine that works for you or feel you need one? Any and everything to do with organizing our lives in the way that suits our individual needs, this is the thread!

EMaree
06-23-2016, 05:02 PM
I'm looking into bullet journally today too -- it's big on Twitter right now, and the zero cost outlay is very attractive, so so I'm giving it a wee go.

It's fun so far, but I could see myself going back to my usual to-do list method soon, just for the ease of apps.

Maryn
06-23-2016, 05:38 PM
I've planned lunches, dinners, and snacks in advance for most of my adult life. I may shift which day we have which meal, or swap out the sides, but having all the ingredients for X number of dinners is an organizational necessity for me. Our kids knew where on my steno-pad grocery list to write which kinds of items nearly as soon as they could read. Now that Mr. Maryn is retired and does half the grocery shopping, he, too, is trained.

I keep To-Do lists on my computer and refer to them often. They tend to be short-term (doctor's appointments needing to be made or kept, oil changes for the car, birthday gifts to be bought, like that) and long term (paint the bathroom, schedule chimney cleaning, measure for curtains and select fabrics I like) things that can wait. It does me good to return to those lists and strike things out rather than delete them. There's a sense of accomplishment in striking out a task I've completed.

I jot down specifics of errands I need to run on a weekly basis using the computer, then copy them to Evernote for access from my phone. (I type so much faster on a real keyboard.) I list stores and sale items to pick up, appointments' times and addresses, the due dates of library books, etc.

I don't do bullet lists. I don't schedule writing time or cleaning time. They happen when they happen, which I recognize is a luxury many people do not enjoy. Monday I wrote nearly all day. Wednesday I didn't write at all but I went to a meeting and four stores. Since I have no deadlines, this works for me just fine.

Myrealana
06-23-2016, 05:50 PM
I'm looking into bullet journally today too -- it's big on Twitter right now, and the zero cost outlay is very attractive, so so I'm giving it a wee go.


This is the first I've seen that. At first, I thought it's not too different from my current to-do list method, but it seems pretty complicated. I don't think I'd stick with it.

I use the phone for event and meeting reminders, but I keep a physical to-do list that I mark similarly: check means done, arrow means moved to a future to-do list, cross out if cancelled. First thing after my morning coffee, I go through my list from the day before, migrate any tasks that still need doing and prep for the day.

I can keep up with that on a daily basis, especially now that it's part of my routine. I was using it just for work, but when I started my new job two months ago, the home routine was disrupted, so now I use one list for both, and mark home/work/writing tasks with different symbols on the right side of the page.

shivadyne
06-24-2016, 08:12 AM
i tend to use a combination of sticky notes, my calendar, and an app on my ipod when it comes to reminders and such.

Lillith1991
06-24-2016, 04:10 PM
I'm looking into bullet journally today too -- it's big on Twitter right now, and the zero cost outlay is very attractive, so so I'm giving it a wee go.

It's fun so far, but I could see myself going back to my usual to-do list method soon, just for the ease of apps.

See, I don't like the vast majority of apps. Writing apps? Gimme! Gimme! I love my Google Drive app on my phone for non-fiction and fan-fiction while out and about, and some minor editing or original stuff while the same. Weather app? Love it! Calendar and youtube and/or Netflix? Love that too. Everything else? Don't need it and don't want it. I'd rather just write things down.

I already have a journal that I can use, got a pen. If it works, my next set up ill be a Leuchtterm1917 and better pen.

Lillith1991
06-27-2016, 10:28 AM
This is the first I've seen that. At first, I thought it's not too different from my current to-do list method, but it seems pretty complicated. I don't think I'd stick with it.

I use the phone for event and meeting reminders, but I keep a physical to-do list that I mark similarly: check means done, arrow means moved to a future to-do list, cross out if cancelled. First thing after my morning coffee, I go through my list from the day before, migrate any tasks that still need doing and prep for the day.

I can keep up with that on a daily basis, especially now that it's part of my routine. I was using it just for work, but when I started my new job two months ago, the home routine was disrupted, so now I use one list for both, and mark home/work/writing tasks with different symbols on the right side of the page.

That actually is the exact type of method used in the bullet journal. Write down tasks and events‚ cross out‚ and change the bullet into a done or migrate symbol as needed. It can take a bit to set up of course‚ but what's 15 mins of set up for the journal itself? Especially for something so customizable to the user? I've seen everything from complicate to simple‚ travel journals‚ composition books‚ binders‚ moleskins etc.

I'm loving mine even though I missed a day already and didn't do anything I planned to yesterday. Just having things written down in a physical space makes me feel better.

EMaree
06-27-2016, 01:56 PM
Quick update: I totally failed at keeping up with bullet journaling, to-do list apps are definitely more my speed. I found the whole timeboxing nature of bullet journaling too much hassle.

One thing I really like about to-do lists is the flexibility -- I'm using TickTick (http://ticktick.com) just now, on PC and phone, and it's a very quick click to move today's items to tomorrow if I'm feeling overwhelmed. I can write 'GP appointment tomorrow evening' and it will automatically file itself into place. I can also hide non-urgent items from the agenda to peruse at my leisure. Wunderlist (http://wunderlist.com) is great too.

Lavern08
06-27-2016, 08:43 PM
...Do you utilize traditional planners, to-do list, calendars etc.? Do you plan meals so that you don't have to think about them as much? Do you have a morning or nighttime routine that works for you or feel you need one?
YES to all of the above - OCD is my middle name. :hi:

Jo Richardson
06-27-2016, 09:10 PM
YES to all of the above - OCD is my middle name. :hi:

A little OCD never hurt anyone. Feng Shui is my middle name. In my silly world, if my surroundings aren't in order, I feel anxious and scattered. I'm a true creature of habit and routine. I mostly write early in the morning (coffee that sits and gets cold and PJ's), sometimes get carried away and write through out the day. Always take breaks, walk around, water my flowers and breath. I'm in awe of people that can jot away in various locations, on a phone, tablet, etc. How wonderful and interesting your minds must be.

I do make notes on people I observe, quotations and interesting words. If I'm out and about, that would probably be a written note, stuck down in my purse. At home, laptop notepad saves notes. When I go to grocery store, hubby says "where's your list?" HATE them, need to go up and down the aisles and pick-up what I see that I need. Keep in mind, I'm an old, stubborn gal.

juniper
06-27-2016, 09:31 PM
My first thought on the bullet journal - had to google that term - is it's similar to the paper Franklin Day Planners I used back in the 80s? 90s? before the electronic versions came out.

https://franklinplanner.fcorgp.com/store/buy/Planners/cat2120006/

I carried my FDP around everywhere and it helped me immensely. Each December I bought the next year's pack and sometimes changed up sizes or styles. I bought a few different covers. I still have a couple in my desk drawer.

I switched to the electronic PDA in the 90s, and now all lives in my iPhone.

What I miss, though, is the written record of my life. I've been sorting through my 16,000+ photos on my laptop and wishing I had a written record of why I took some of them, what was important that day.

"A picture is worth a thousand words." Maybe, but I'd like to have the words to go with those photos. I guess that's why Creative Memories style scrapbooking was big for awhile - photos plus descriptions. I did that for a few weeks back in the day, but it's too time consuming.

I wish I'd kept a written daily journal for those decades past. I have some but was never consistent. The bullet journals would at least be an outline of what was going on all those days.

Siri Kirpal
06-27-2016, 11:42 PM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

I have a to do on paper near my place at the dining table. (We only have one.) At the top of the list are thing to be done that day, then a line break, then things to be done in the near future or if there's time. I always put writing tasks on the list in a special section at the bottom.

I don't plan meals in the usual sense, but I know from long experience how much we eat, and gauge shopping accordingly. I have specific things I do on specific days of the week. (Actually, I used to be more flexible, but since Mr. Siri retired, he often has the use of our single car, so we plan around each other.)

In the morning after grooming and getting dressed, I read/recite two or more Sikh banis (kinda like psalms), do some yoga, do a 31 minute meditation, take my hukam (literally "command"--a random reading from Sikh scriptures) before getting breakfast.

In the evening, I do other similar readings and/or meditation (currently readings) and take another hukam before taking a bath and going to bed.

I do most of my writing in the evening after dinner. That way I'm not thinking about the chores to be done.

Also, Mr. Siri and I sit down and discuss our day after dinner before I write. This is a time to discuss future plans, air grievances, mention those neat little things that happened during the day. Sometimes I brainstorm writing stuff with him. Which is super useful.

As you may note, all of the above is super low tech.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

Lillith1991
06-28-2016, 02:34 AM
Quick update: I totally failed at keeping up with bullet journaling, to-do list apps are definitely more my speed. I found the whole timeboxing nature of bullet journaling too much hassle.

One thing I really like about to-do lists is the flexibility -- I'm using TickTick (http://ticktick.com) just now, on PC and phone, and it's a very quick click to move today's items to tomorrow if I'm feeling overwhelmed. I can write 'GP appointment tomorrow evening' and it will automatically file itself into place. I can also hide non-urgent items from the agenda to peruse at my leisure. Wunderlist (http://wunderlist.com) is great too.

Were you trying to make it pretty or did you go the minimalist route? I've been reading a lot of blog posts and watching a lot of vids and some make their's pretty because it encourages them to use it more. Others prefer simplicity. Mine is pretty simple at the moment. I think, but don't quote me on it, that I'll be making my next spread a bit prettier.

taraesque
06-28-2016, 03:13 AM
I do to-do lists on stick notes or notepads. If I attempt anything else, its too structured and my mind doesn't like to be structured.

Now, I wish I could be organized, with everything color coded, and neatly arranged. I admire that. But I've tried it and its not my style.

noranne
06-28-2016, 05:56 AM
I plan out meals in advance. I am honestly puzzled as to how else that would work. Do people just go to the store and buy whatever?

I use Todoist for my general tasks. I like that it's cloud-based, so I can access via my phone or the web. But I don't track too much stuff there. For the most part, I don't have too much trouble remembering what I need to get done. At work I write out a to-do list because it helps me focus and crossing things out is the only satisfying thing I do all day long.

Lavern08
06-28-2016, 10:42 PM
I plan out meals in advance. I am honestly puzzled as to how else that would work. Do people just go to the store and buy whatever?
I know, right? :Shrug:

I cut out coupons, make a grocery list based on my plan for the next 2 weeks, and 99% of the time, I buy only what's on my list.

(Yes, a pint of Haagen-Dazs is always on my list) :greenie

Silva
06-29-2016, 02:08 AM
Just a notepad and a random pen is all the gadgetry I need. Nothing super nice, or else I get perfectionist and fancy about organizing my organizing and don't end up getting stuff done. Stores like Office Depot, or organizational gadgets of pretty much any type are delightful and wonderful, but I don't find they actually enhance my productivity. For my sanity, I keep my life and environment as uncluttered as possible and therefore don't truly need much in the way of organization tools, anyway.

For my morning routine, I get dressed, etc. (hanging around in pajamas or bedhead drives me up the wall), then sit and browse social media until breakfast (I like to start out my day feeling connected to the world at large while not having to actually expend energy doing so, heh). Then I make plans for the day (sometimes on paper, sometimes not) and execute them. (Or not.) Appointments go on the (physical, paper, on the fridge) calendar as they are made. I rarely look at the calendar, but social anxiety makes it unlikely that I'll forget about them or need them written down elsewhere.

I don't meal plan, because I don't use recipes or create fancy meals. I have staple carbs, staple meats, staple spices, and staple vegetables and fruit. We typically buy most things in bulk, but get fresh veggies and fruit about once a week. So we rotate through things each night, fixing it according to what sounds good. Potatoes? Pasta? Rice? Beans? What meat goes best with that/sounds good tonight? What sort of flavor profile do I feel like? Spicy? Savory? Sweet? How much vegetables can I sneak it before it just gets yucky? (My kids eat vegetables fine. I am the one who has to be babied.)

My husband likes to plan for the next day in the evening, but that part of my brain is officially shut off by that point. Evenings are my time to do me-things, after the kids are in bed, which is usually writing, reading, or watching a show, or some combination thereof. I enjoy being entertained by and/or inspired by other people's creative efforts. I wait until I am almost too sleepy to go to bed, or else I will be stuck tossing and turning and developing random itches and being irritated that the blankets aren't right anymore and resenting the fact that I'm not sleeping already.

I have a love/hate relationship with structure and schedules. I like devising them because I am a naturally organized person, but then I get all rebellious and "don't tell me what I can and can't do right now!" if I try to use them. For my kids' sake, we have specific mealtimes and a more or less specific bedtime for them, but other than that, I try to remain as flexible as possible. (School has not been a factor, yet.)

muse
06-29-2016, 09:53 PM
Quick update: I totally failed at keeping up with bullet journaling, to-do list apps are definitely more my speed. I found the whole timeboxing nature of bullet journaling too much hassle.

One thing I really like about to-do lists is the flexibility -- I'm using TickTick (http://ticktick.com) just now, on PC and phone, and it's a very quick click to move today's items to tomorrow if I'm feeling overwhelmed. I can write 'GP appointment tomorrow evening' and it will automatically file itself into place. I can also hide non-urgent items from the agenda to peruse at my leisure. Wunderlist (http://wunderlist.com) is great too.

I love TickTick! :heart: Have it on my laptop, phone and iPad. So easy to use.

heza
06-29-2016, 10:21 PM
I feel like I should try bullet journaling. I had already started doing things like that in my work notes... tasks got different bullets for being different things or having different priorities, and I would move the unfinished tasks to the next day... I read some about it but I didn't see the word "timeboxing." What is that?

I'll look at TickTick, but I'm not good at typing things on my phone, so I'm afraid that would get too tedious to use.

Lillith1991
07-03-2016, 03:54 AM
I feel like I should try bullet journaling. I had already started doing things like that in my work notes... tasks got different bullets for being different things or having different priorities, and I would move the unfinished tasks to the next day... I read some about it but I didn't see the word "timeboxing." What is that?

I'll look at TickTick, but I'm not good at typing things on my phone, so I'm afraid that would get too tedious to use.

Try it! Maybe it will work since you already do something like it to begin with.

ION: my neice wants a bullet journal. This child is a mini-me.

Taylor Harbin
07-03-2016, 05:32 AM
I have to keep my routine flexible because my life is not consistent. I can write at various times of the day (usually after work), most days of the week, and go on page count (manual typewriter). I try for four pages, but my arm is still recovering from surgery (just now at the point where I can type with both hands) so my output is more like two pages. I usually wind up the clock on my desk and get a full bottle of water, so I have no reason to pause midway. It works most of the time.

Lillith1991
07-03-2016, 06:52 AM
I have to keep my routine flexible because my life is not consistent. I can write at various times of the day (usually after work), most days of the week, and go on page count (manual typewriter). I try for four pages, but my arm is still recovering from surgery (just now at the point where I can type with both hands) so my output is more like two pages. I usually wind up the clock on my desk and get a full bottle of water, so I have no reason to pause midway. It works most of the time.

That is why I love my bullet journal so far. It is VERY flexible. I can just write a list of things I would like to get done that day or the next and I'm good to go. If I don't do everything, I just move it forward or go to my calendar in my journal or future log and enter it in there if it is something that is long term.

Lillith1991
07-18-2016, 09:15 PM
I love my bullet journal. Almost a month out and it does help with bic and just knowing what I have to do that day.

Gilroy Cullen
07-18-2016, 09:34 PM
I think I've always been against anything that's specialized and can't be multi-used when it comes to functional computer software. (Games definitely rate different. :D ) So for a long time, I did the hand written to do list. I'd tried creating them in Word/WordPerfect, but couldn't figure out a way to make them flexible enough to make me happy.

My girlfriend then introduced me to this note taking software called OneNote, from Micro$oft (unfortunately), that had the flexibility of the hand written with the neatness of the computer screen. Plus it's loaded to both computer and tablet, so changes to one are reflected on the other. I've been using it at home and work for ... a few months now, and it does wonders.

Astla
07-21-2016, 11:46 PM
I've had a bullet journal for a year and a half now and I love it! Most days are just a to do list, but I love having the flexibility to turn to the next page and write whatever notes or thoughts I want. It's been pretty easy to keep track of everything through the index, though I do wish my notebook had a few more bookmarks. For appointments I write in my bullet journal then set up an alarm reminder in my phone's calendar.

I'm glad to see you're liking the system too. My advice to anyone trying it out would be to keep it simple. A lot of people customize their bullet journals with fancy calendars and labels, but it doesn't need to be pretty to be effective.

Shadow_Ferret
07-28-2016, 03:39 AM
I like the chaos method. Makes life interesting.

Niniva
07-28-2016, 04:07 AM
I like the chaos method. Makes life interesting.

People and the Chaos Method are gonna be the death of me yet!

DragonHeart
01-05-2017, 09:23 PM
I know this is an older thread but with the new year and everything I'm sure a lot of people are working on getting organized again.

This is my second year of using a bullet journal. Hopefully it will be my first year of using it consistently. I find when I do actually use it, I do stay on track and actually get things done, because I have an easily accessible way to organize and plan.

It's very flexible, and as simple or as complicated as you want to make it. Most searches will turn up some very pretty BuJos from places like Boho Berry. The thing to keep in mind is that these types of highly artistic journals are designed that way because they aren't just a tool, they're an actual job for some people. For others they can be a hobby, or a hybrid of a journal/scrapbook/travelogue.

But the basic, original Bullet Journal is literally just an extremely flexible to do list with a calendar system.

Mine is very minimalistic but I have adapted it heavily to better suit my purposes. I use the future log, the index, and the monthly log. Instead of daily logs I do a weekly spread, which works because of my larger notebook. I have space to write in goals for the current week, things for next week and a free space for anything else I might need. I used to do weekly trackers in that space, but I went back to a monthly version for now.

The tracker helps me stay focused on long term goals or new habits/routines I'm trying to develop. This month I have 5 daily things to track: using the BuJo itself, reading, writing, working out and logging my food in MFP. I also have some weekly reminders, like making sure I get trash and/or recycling out on the correct day, and to keep my inboxes clean. I've also developed a separate tracker solely for the actual workouts, which is a self-modified 12 week training plan.

Other things I use my BuJo for: wishlists, gift ideas, and pretty much any collection of notes for projects or anything else I'm working on. One thing I do want to incorporate more is some actual journaling, maybe once a week or so to start.

stuffguy
05-27-2019, 09:20 PM
I also love Wunderlist! Lately my team at work (mostly remote employees and contractors) has been using Flowster (https://flowster.app/) too. It's been quite the time-saver.


Quick update: I totally failed at keeping up with bullet journaling, to-do list apps are definitely more my speed. I found the whole timeboxing nature of bullet journaling too much hassle.

One thing I really like about to-do lists is the flexibility -- I'm using TickTick (http://ticktick.com) just now, on PC and phone, and it's a very quick click to move today's items to tomorrow if I'm feeling overwhelmed. I can write 'GP appointment tomorrow evening' and it will automatically file itself into place. I can also hide non-urgent items from the agenda to peruse at my leisure. Wunderlist (http://wunderlist.com) is great too.