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rosehips
06-20-2016, 03:03 AM
My novel is set in a fantasy world in an era based on WWII, with similar technology. I need to describe a character's attempts to start and ride a motorcycle (she has never ridden one before). It would be nice if the motorcycle resembled a Zundapp or other German model, though it's really not essential. I've been reading what I can about the Zunddapp models, but so far I haven't found a description of how one drives one. What does one do to start the motorcycle? It seems a later model had a foot gear change, so I guess that means earlier models had hand gear changes? How did that work?

She's observed others riding them, but she's going to really struggle with driving one herself. This is a significant plot obstacle--she needs to get to a neighboring town as fast as she can, and this is the only vehicle she has access to.

Thanks for any help.
(http://www.antiquemotorcycle.org/bboard/showthread.php?9845-Zundapp-KS601)

Duncan J Macdonald
06-20-2016, 04:32 PM
Here's a link to a You Tube video on starting one of the Indian WLA (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sxiCtZMSiiY)bikes.

You'll notice that there are two foot pedals. The one on the right is the rear brake. The one on the left is the clutch. The gear shift is on the right hand side of the tank. Also on the right side of the engine is the kick-starter -- looks like a bicycle pedal that folds.

Indian's were a little odd. The throttle is on the left hand grip. The spark advance is on the right hand grip. The lever on the right grip is the front brake.

As you can see from the video, the gentleman first opens the fuel petcock on the right side of the engine, then pull out the choke on the left side. He then kicks the engine three times to prime the carburetors, advances the spark, then kicks it to start. All this is done in Neutral.

The gear shift is a straight pattern, and this model had three gears plus neutral.

Duncan

ironmikezero
06-20-2016, 06:27 PM
WWII Zundapp models were most often issued with sidecars (that might be forgiving if your MC has never ridden a motorcycle before), although there were courier models (no sidecar). They were all 6v, kick start; some had dual shifting capability (hand/foot shift & hand/foot clutch). See links . . .

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AgejfN70HWY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fRfVXBemKgg

http://www.motorcycleclassics.com/classic-german-motorcycles/1942-zundapp-ks750.aspx?PageId=1#ArticleContent

http://www.ima-usa.com/original-german-wwii-1942-zundapp-ks-750-motorcycle-and-sidecar-matched-serial-numbers.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KBz7q4jqJzk

rosehips
06-21-2016, 12:59 AM
Thank you both. I've watched the videos you linked as well as others youtube then recommended. Very helpful!

rosehips
06-21-2016, 01:35 AM
You'll notice that there are two foot pedals. The one on the right is the rear brake. The one on the left is the clutch.


Hi Duncan,
I'm reading about older models with the foot clutch and I gather these could be quite difficult to manage, because you had to have you foot up on the clutch when stopped, like at an intersection. Did the other foot have to be up, too, on the brake? I'm not entirely understanding this.


Also: if my protagonist doesn't know how to ride a motorcycle, I'm thinking it's unlikely she'd figure out how to use the clutch and shift gears. If that's the case, how fast would she be able to go without shifting? I imagine she's damage the transmission, too.

Another question:
Are these steps (from this website (http://www.instructables.com/id/Riding-a-Motorcycle/?ALLSTEPS)) accurate for a 40s model? Part of the issue I'm seeing is that they assume the clutch is held, not a pedal. How would I describe my protag getting the motorcycle moving--does she need to release the foot clutch slowly, the way this describes releasing the hand clutch--otherwise the bike would stall, right?
1. Downshift into first gear.
2. Push backwards with your feet until your heels are the only thing on the ground.
3. Release the clutch VERY slowly until the motorcycle begins to roll.

Duncan J Macdonald
06-27-2016, 08:20 PM
Hi Duncan,
I'm reading about older models with the foot clutch and I gather these could be quite difficult to manage, because you had to have you foot up on the clutch when stopped, like at an intersection. Did the other foot have to be up, too, on the brake? I'm not entirely understanding this.


Also: if my protagonist doesn't know how to ride a motorcycle, I'm thinking it's unlikely she'd figure out how to use the clutch and shift gears. If that's the case, how fast would she be able to go without shifting? I imagine she's damage the transmission, too.

Another question:
Are these steps (from this website (http://www.instructables.com/id/Riding-a-Motorcycle/?ALLSTEPS)) accurate for a 40s model? Part of the issue I'm seeing is that they assume the clutch is held, not a pedal. How would I describe my protag getting the motorcycle moving--does she need to release the foot clutch slowly, the way this describes releasing the hand clutch--otherwise the bike would stall, right?
1. Downshift into first gear.
2. Push backwards with your feet until your heels are the only thing on the ground.
3. Release the clutch VERY slowly until the motorcycle begins to roll.

Foot clutches were equipped with a lock for just that reason. You also have a hand brake for the front wheel, so your right foot can be on the ground.

For starting from a dead stop, on a level street, you'd let out the clutch and add throttle at the same time so you don't kill the engine. Motorcycle clutches are designed to slip, so you have some leeway for a novice. Your steps will work, but the second step is not needed, and the third should be modified to add throttle as I described above.

You should be able to ride in first gear up to 15 - 20 mph without destroying anything. The transmission is a gear-type, driven by a primary chain from the engine, then a shaft to the rear wheel [WW II Indians used a shaft final drive -- other manufacturers used a chain]. The engine will be damaged before the transmission.