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realityfix
06-12-2016, 07:38 AM
Yes, I am taking the plunge. I'm about 10,000 words into my novella to be submitted to Tor.com (thank you Aggy B.). This will be my first attempt to submit anything I've written so far and I have no real expectations. The wisdom that comes from being 53 years old, a father of two teenage boys, and a stepfather to another teenage boy and girl tells me this is the safest way to go into it. Expect nothing. Observe everything. Learn from the experience. Improve on future writing opportunities.

So, I'm trying to develop my own submission ritual. Should I:

A) Prostrate myself before a bust of Stephen King and pray for divine intervention;

B) Climb on top of my roof and shout my mighty yawp to the world (Okay, it''s a Walt Whitman thing); or

C) Order a cardiac-special meat lovers pizza from Toulas, have a beer, enjoy the satisfaction of being able to say that I have finally done it.

What are some of your submission rituals? Anyway, back to the laptop. I want to see if I can two-finger type another 300-400 words before I sleep.

Filigree
06-12-2016, 08:10 AM
I used to have submission rituals for art and mms: a cordial glass of liquor or cup of tea, a bit of dark chocolate, a certain candle, and a poem I'd recite. They made me feel better, but they didn't change the chances of selling the piece. Now I hit 'send', log the submission on a spreadsheet, and forget about it until my calendar warns me five months have passed...at which time I count the piece as rejected. Then move on.

Williebee
06-12-2016, 08:13 AM
I'm suggesting that A, B, and C, become B, C, and D. A gets replaced by:

A) Submit something.

No submit. No pizza. Yawping to the world is still cool, though. :)

Good luck!

realityfix
06-12-2016, 09:51 PM
Thanks! As I said earlier, I really don't have any over the top expectations and I realize that my chances are slim to none in my first attempt but the important thing is that I did it. Actually, my first choice was C. Hopefully, they give constructive feedback on rejection letters. So, even if they tell me to not quit my day job they might suggest to me that I could beef up the plot a bit, add some depth to my MCs, or your story deserves a better ending. Thanks again for the positive vibes.

Bolero
06-13-2016, 02:34 PM
Thanks! As I said earlier, I really don't have any over the top expectations and I realize that my chances are slim to none in my first attempt but the important thing is that I did it. Actually, my first choice was C. Hopefully, they give constructive feedback on rejection letters. So, even if they tell me to not quit my day job they might suggest to me that I could beef up the plot a bit, add some depth to my MCs, or your story deserves a better ending. Thanks again for the positive vibes.

Unless the novella submission is offering detailed feedback, I wouldn't expect anything more than a "thank you for submitting to us" from a sample. If they ask for a full manuscript and read it all the way through you might get a few comments. Sometimes it is literally that your book is of publishable quality, but they didn't like it enough. Nothing wrong with the book, just not enough to the publisher's taste for them to give it any more time and money.

EMaree
06-13-2016, 03:04 PM
I'm a 'log in it the spreadsheet and feel proud' type of person, and for massive draining projects like novel drafts and rewrites I tend to take a few days off to play video games as a reward. There's nothing wrong with a submission ritual! It's good to reward yourself occasionally.

For writers with a history of anxiety or depression, it can be vital -- reward yourself for doing the scary thing, help your brain learn that being brave is rewarding. :)

Oh, and personally, I'd go for the pizza option! :D

fistnik
06-14-2016, 02:41 PM
At the beginning my rituals consisted in:

A) Plunging my head in piles of ice cream, Scarface-style.

B) Failing to sleep.

C) (Optional) If the market has a queue tracker, jackhammering the refresh button with my index finger until my keyboard is full of bloody fingerprints (you can't have a good ritual without some blood-shedding!).

Once I started getting friendly with failure, though, my ritual became forgetting about the submission as soon as I click "submit," taking rejection from granted, and starting to work in something better right away.

realityfix
06-15-2016, 07:51 AM
The repetition of writing and rejection, which vexes most new unproven writers, doesn't bother my creative side (being left-handed!) as much as it builds generic frustration. My day job allows me time to put myself on autopilot and dedicate a portion of my mental faculties to developing story ideas. I then jot down such ideas on pieces of paper that I bring home and leave all over the house for my wife to find. What happens next is that I go to Barnes and Noble or some other book store and I scan the current selection of SF and F books, read the back cover or the inside cover for a brief description of selected books, and say to myself "Man, if this is what sells then the ideas I have ought to sell as well." At 53, I may never be published but I believe my material to be pretty decent. I told my sons, who are one year away from starting college, that I will leave my manuscripts to them. One son said ""Uh, thanks Dad, I guess." The other son has actually started reading some of the material and asking me questions about it. Perhaps, he will be the writer that I tried to be. Time to get back to the manuscript I'm working on now.