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blacbird
05-16-2016, 08:08 AM
At least according to one source:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/sap/2016/01/06/banished-words-2016/?sr_source=lift_gemini&nowelcome&utm_source=gemini&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=SAP#6a7dba192695

But, seriously, "conversation" and "problematic"? Who is offended by these words?

caw

Roxxsmom
05-16-2016, 08:10 AM
At least according to one source:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/sap/2016/01/06/banished-words-2016/?sr_source=lift_gemini&nowelcome&utm_source=gemini&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=SAP#6a7dba192695

But, seriously, "conversation" and "problematic"? Who is offended by these words?

caw

I think these "word banning" sites tend to be rather tongue in cheek and include words and turns of phrase that are perfectly legitimate but have become overused by all the "cool kids" in specific social contexts.

So, for instance, is on the list because people say things like, "I am SO through with people using the word 'so' this way!" It's not all uses of the word, but that specific one.

poetinahat
05-16-2016, 08:58 AM
And the award for "least effort expended, yet still published by Forbes" goes to...

--

I'd nominate "Just sayin'" - and the implied, "...so don't call me on it, because I can't defend it".

BenPanced
05-16-2016, 03:59 PM
It's a listicle. Everybody loves listicles.

:sarcasm

Kylabelle
05-16-2016, 04:52 PM
I'm not ever in favor of banning any words whatsoever, though at times there are expressions I come to find annoying. But in my view, the more words the better. Each has its place in precise expression, even the ugly, profane, vulgar, and initially misapplied.

If I were a mean Creative Writing teacher I would assign people writing projects using the words they most despise.

:e2teeth:

Rolling Thunder
05-16-2016, 04:53 PM
We should band together to ban these people into utter banishment. Or give them cyber-noogies, which apparently is still not a banned linguistic.

*pushes Haggis to forefront*

Go forth and perish for our great cause!

Kylabelle
05-16-2016, 04:56 PM
Your assignment is to write a poem using the word "cyber-noogies".

A lyric, if you please.

robeiae
05-16-2016, 04:57 PM
Moist.

Also, "physicality." Every freaking English-speaking sportcaster in every freaking sport uses this word now, many use it almost incessantly. It's not that good a word. It really isn't.

Rolling Thunder
05-16-2016, 04:58 PM
Your assignment is to write a poem using the word "cyber-noogies".

A lyric, if you please.

*gives kyla a moist cyber-noogie*

Kylabelle
05-16-2016, 05:00 PM
*barfs in thread*

*with appropriate non-physicality in order to preserve certain sensibilities expressed above*

robeiae
05-16-2016, 05:02 PM
It really winds me up, the "he brings a real physicality to the team" crap. It's as annoying as "strategery." Or "lockbox."

Kylabelle
05-16-2016, 05:32 PM
"Strategery"? Is that something different than strategy?

Also, you should stop listening to sports announcers as sources of instructive language use.

Though they often are creative within their bounds.

MarkEsq
05-16-2016, 07:03 PM
It really winds me up, the "he brings a real physicality to the team" crap. It's as annoying as "strategery." Or "lockbox."

Relax, man, can't we just conversate about this?

Yesterday I banned my kids from ever using the word (or is it a phrase?!) "price-point." We watch a lot of HGTV and it seems the word "price" is no longer good enough. Grr.

Lauram6123
05-16-2016, 08:02 PM
Okay. I have one. I used to work in retail, and my manager would tell me to "merchandise" the window. I hardly ever hear that word used as a verb, but when I do, it still makes my skin crawl.

Rolling Thunder
05-16-2016, 08:19 PM
Stormageddon -- a bastardized word conceived by the bread and milk industries in a conspiracy with meteorologists to turn everyone into French toast munching zombies.

Kylabelle
05-16-2016, 08:44 PM
Yeah. They oughta just call it Stormy McStormyface instead.

robeiae
05-16-2016, 08:59 PM
"Perfect storm" is even worse, mostly because people now use it in reference to any confluence of events, with little concern over actual perfection.

CassandraW
05-16-2016, 09:10 PM
It really winds me up, the "he brings a real physicality to the team" crap. It's as annoying as "strategery." Or "lockbox."

I like to think I bring a real physicality to AW.

c.e.lawson
05-16-2016, 09:15 PM
I like to think I bring a real physicality to AW.

I think you bring more of a clevercality, and Robo brings a sarcasticality.

CassandraW
05-16-2016, 09:36 PM
I think you bring more of a clevercality, and Robo brings a sarcasticality.

robo also brings a distinct whiff of drakkar noir.

c.e.lawson
05-16-2016, 09:45 PM
robo also brings a distinct whiff of drakkar noir.

Along with single malt scotch and cigar smoke

robeiae
05-16-2016, 09:49 PM
Pardon, but I'm classy. Old Spice, all the way.

c.e.lawson
05-16-2016, 09:58 PM
"Ask" as a noun really grates on me.

blacbird
05-16-2016, 10:55 PM
I could SOOOO do without "awesome".

caw

Maryn
05-17-2016, 12:22 AM
Wait, how do you use ask as a noun? Gimme an ask? I've got an ask for next time I see Grandpa?

robeiae
05-17-2016, 12:59 AM
Expecting the Mets to win the World Series is a big ask.

c.e.lawson
05-17-2016, 01:05 AM
Wait, how do you use ask as a noun? Gimme an ask? I've got an ask for next time I see Grandpa?

Yes, most often I hear it used like what Rob wrote. Good God, I just looked it up, and apparently it's been in use as both a verb and a noun for a LONG time - around a thousand years:

http://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2014/03/a-big-ask.html

dawinsor
05-17-2016, 01:31 AM
I try to be tolerant because language is supposed to be flexible and creative, but OMG I want to kill "gift" used as a verb. What's wrong with "give"?

(My blood pressure went up just writing this. I think I may not be rational on this.)

GerardPourlavie
05-17-2016, 02:00 AM
It depends on the context but if we're airing our prejudices I dislike when 'like' is used almost randomly by under twenty-fives - you know, like, all the time

kuwisdelu
05-17-2016, 02:39 AM
It depends on the context but if we're airing our prejudices I dislike when 'like' is used almost randomly by under twenty-fives - you know, like, all the time

So is it okay if you're, like, over twenty-five? :)

Chrissy
05-17-2016, 02:48 AM
I have been informed many times by my son that the word "cheesy" is an abomination. I just can't seem to find another word. Suggestions are welcome.

Kylabelle
05-17-2016, 02:48 AM
Like, it's an awesome big ask for people to stop gifting each other all the time. It's so cheesy.

Chrissy
05-17-2016, 02:49 AM
Precisely my thought.

CassandraW
05-17-2016, 02:50 AM
Like, it's an awesome big ask for people to stop gifting each other all the time. It's so cheesy.

nonsense. you just need a life-hack.

("hack" = my nomination for word to be banned).

mirandashell
05-17-2016, 02:54 AM
So.... speaking as a non-American .......

WTF is a noogie?

Latina Bunny
05-17-2016, 03:27 AM
I don't believe in banning words. Languge evolves, and lingo exists. *shrugs*

Everyone has their own likes and dislikes, though.

So.... speaking as a non-American .......

WTF is a noogie?

It's when you rub someone's head hard with your knuckles. Sometimes done to younger siblings or close friends.

Quoted from Google dictionary:

"ˈno͝oɡē/
nounNORTH AMERICANinformal



a hard poke or grind with the knuckles, especially on a person's head."

Beachgirl
05-17-2016, 03:29 AM
If I hear the word "robust" one more time in a meeting I might have to hurt someone.

Kylabelle
05-17-2016, 03:30 AM
That's a robust ask, there, Beachgirl.

(I am practicing.)

blacbird
05-17-2016, 03:46 AM
Expecting the Mets to win the World Series is a big ask.

Dude, they've like, done it twice.

caw

Ravioli
05-17-2016, 03:53 AM
I agree with "break the internet". I am so sick of hyperboles when it's invariably about nothing other than witty comebacks or viral riddles. Also "manspreading". I have NEVER EVER witnessed a man deliberately spreading his legs for any reason other than getting comfortable, and I GUARANTEE YOU that he will close those legs and sit normal if you ask him to let you have the seat next to him. Not everything men do needs to become an issue for some bored people to screech about.
But where is "bae"?

CassandraW
05-17-2016, 04:12 AM
I agree with "break the internet". I am so sick of hyperboles when it's invariably about nothing other than witty comebacks or viral riddles. Also "manspreading". I have NEVER EVER witnessed a man deliberately spreading his legs for any reason other than getting comfortable, and I GUARANTEE YOU that he will close those legs and sit normal if you ask him to let you have the seat next to him. Not everything men do needs to become an issue for some bored people to screech about.
But where is "bae"?

you have clearly not spent much time on the NYC subway.

some men take up three seats with outspread legs while old people, disabled people, and heavily pregnant women stand in front of them. sure, you could ask them to move their legs. but there's been a recent uptick in face slashings on the subway, so you just might hesitate. and yes, I've had such a request ignored.

I hate the word, but manspreading is a thing. in most cases, they are just being oblivious. but in some cases, I am convinced they are being deliberately insolent and rude.

robeiae
05-17-2016, 04:14 AM
This is literally the most taxing thread ever.

CassandraW
05-17-2016, 04:15 AM
This is literally the most taxing thread ever.

don't you mansplain to me, robovowels.

robeiae
05-17-2016, 04:22 AM
*mannaps*

Katharine Tree
05-17-2016, 04:25 AM
"Whilst" and "whatnot". No, they do not make you sound smart.

CassandraW
05-17-2016, 04:31 AM
"Whilst" and "whatnot". No, they do not make you sound smart.

Whilst is much more commonly used by Brits than by Americans. I don't believe it is considered either pretentious or particularly intellectual there, though of course I will bow to a Brit saying otherwise.

neither word bothers me.

mirandashell
05-17-2016, 04:49 AM
Yeah.... whilst and whatnot are perfectly normal words here. 'Whatnot' is often used when someone can't think of a name of an object. 'It's over there, in the.... thingy... whatnot.... cupboard!'

And 'whilst' is used a lot in certain contexts. And not just by people who want to seem smart. Here it is completely normal. Especially in some accents.

pinkbowvintage
05-17-2016, 05:25 AM
I could do without "glare" only because some variation of "She glared at me" comes up way too often in some people's writing and for some reason it irks me.

ajaye
05-17-2016, 05:30 AM
My mum used to use 'and whatnot' for 'and blah blah blah'. The forgotten whatnot was a thingamejig. :)

Roxxsmom
05-17-2016, 05:34 AM
We used to say "whilst" in my family when we were being intentionally silly or putting on a "fakely" elegant or old fashioned voice. It's hard to explain, but an example sticks in my mind of a time when I was a kid, and my aunt was gabbling excitedly to my dad about something as he walked down the hall to the bathroom. He turned to her and said, "Oh sister pure, I must withdraw now to take a sweet dump. Do you wish to sit on the edge of the tub and keep me company whilst I do?"

Yes, this was my family of origin. That thing about being raised by wolves? It's not true, because wolves are a lot saner than my family.

But in the UK, people often say "whilst" where Americans would say "while." It's like "smelt versus "smelled" etc.

Taran
05-17-2016, 06:57 AM
"Tartly."

I have no idea why I hate that word. But I do.

America's Proust
05-17-2016, 07:16 AM
Definitely the word "mansplaining." I can't stand the whining sycophants that pretend they're actually doing something useful by shouting it in people's faces.

SamGlass
05-17-2016, 07:25 AM
Supercilious. There are dozens of other ways to say "snobbish" that don't sound quite so, well, snobbish.

CassandraW
05-17-2016, 07:28 AM
Definitely the word "mansplaining." I can't stand the whining sycophants that pretend they're actually doing something useful by shouting it in people's faces.

Me, I don't so much hate individual words so much as I dislike it when people use absurdly exaggerated out-of-proportion hyperbole that has little, if any, connection to any real-world situation.

Lillith1991
05-17-2016, 07:57 AM
Definitely the word "mansplaining." I can't stand the whining sycophants that pretend they're actually doing something useful by shouting it in people's faces.

Disagree. Words like mansplain do succinctly vocalize a very specific way of acting and attitude that men can have, especially when it comes to men looking down on women and explaining things about our bodies or how society treats us that we live with every day and how wrong our perceptions are. However, words can always be overused and that one is no different. And there's really no need to use the word if the other person is likely to actually listen vs. when they won't even attempt to listen.

Samsonet
05-17-2016, 08:09 AM
Idk about banning it, but does it feel weird to anyone else that "a lesbian" (as a noun) is correct usage, but "a gay" or "a bisexual" isn't?

I'm guilty of using "ask" as a noun. If it changes anything, I use it to refer to a very specific message, delivered via tumblr, and not for questions in general.

jjdebenedictis
05-17-2016, 09:38 AM
Idk about banning it, but does it feel weird to anyone else that "a lesbian" (as a noun) is correct usage, but "a gay" or "a bisexual" isn't?

Well, I know one lesbian woman who prefers lesbian be used as an adjective, not a noun. As she puts it, lesbian describes her, but it's not everything that she is, nor is it even the most important thing about her.

Re-modernist
05-17-2016, 10:51 AM
"Staccato"--very overused "smart" word in thrillers.

shivadyne
05-17-2016, 11:57 AM
why would someone want to ban the word "so"? that's odd. i'd want to ban the phrase "no homo" because it's so unnecessary lmao

thepicpic
05-17-2016, 12:07 PM
A grouching thread? Count me in.

Being in the eternal job hunt (who'd have thought cutting funding to libraries would be bad?) I've developed an acute and slightly rabid aversion to 'proactive'. My eye twitched just typing it. It outweighs my hatred for 'app', which I feel should be thrown into the sun and if it dares crawl out blackened and burned, it should get hurled back in.
And if anyone ever says 'trending' to my face then I shall not be held responsible for my actions due to temporary loss of sanity.

As to above, maybe it's because I'm not in the US or a major city for that matter, but I've never heard the term 'mansplaining' outside tongue-in-cheek usage here.

shivadyne
05-17-2016, 12:21 PM
As to above, maybe it's because I'm not in the US or a major city for that matter, but I've never heard the term 'mansplaining' outside tongue-in-cheek usage here.

it's used pretty rarely in my opinion, but i don't mind the word. after all, some men can be really condescending towards women. :/

Roxxsmom
05-17-2016, 12:43 PM
it's used pretty rarely in my opinion, but i don't mind the word. after all, some men can be really condescending towards women. :/

Yeah, I haven't run across the term "manspalining" used in conversation that much, and I think it's nice to finally have a word for something many guys do that's been driving me crazy all my life. And I'm not sure how using the term would be something sycophants do. Telling someone he's mansplaining is the opposite of being obsequious, imo. It's pretty confrontational, actually, and likely to start a fight.

One word I've loathed for a while is "incentivize." "Best practice" is another. And "synergize." Pretty much all those stupid business jargon words that get tossed out by administrators when they're trying to manipulate people.

shivadyne
05-17-2016, 12:51 PM
Yeah, I haven't run across the term "manspalining" used in conversation that much, and I think it's nice to finally have a word for something many guys do that's been driving me crazy all my life. And I'm not sure how using the term would be something sycophants do. Telling someone he's mansplaining is the opposite of being obsequious, imo. It's pretty confrontational, actually, and likely to start a fight.

it really is. having men talk down to you makes you feel like crap and then there's a word that you can finally use to call them out on it. a sycophant wouldn't be using this word because it's not supposed to make men feel good. it's supposed to be a way to tell them off for the way they are acting.

Roxxsmom
05-17-2016, 12:52 PM
it really is. having men talk down to you makes you feel like crap and then there's a word that you can finally use to call them out on it. a sycophant wouldn't be using this word because it's not supposed to make men feel good. it's supposed to be a way to tell them off for the way they are acting.

Or think it at least, as I'm usually too much of a sycophant to actually have the guts to use it and get yelled at. :greenie:

shivadyne
05-17-2016, 12:56 PM
Or think it at least, as I'm usually too much of a sycophant to actually have the guts to use it and get yelled at. :greenie:

yeah, i don't like confrontations either. it's still nice to have the option to say it, at least. :)

Rolling Thunder
05-17-2016, 03:15 PM
Interesting. I thought mansplaining was some type of torture...involving a rack or testicle screws...

Shara
05-17-2016, 03:58 PM
I think it's not so much the words that are the problem as to their usage. Things that turn into 'business speak' can become very irritating.

For instance, in the day job at the moment the word "challenge" keeps popping up in reports as a euphemism for an impossible task. So if someone says, in a meeting or a report, that "meeting this deadline will be a challenge" what they really mean is, "you bastards have set a stupidly short deadline for this job that I haven't got a hope in hell of being able to meet, and I'm not allowed to whine about it".

It makes me feel old but the current habit amongst the young generation to shorten words that really don't need to be shortened really bugs me. "Goss" for "gossip". "Sitch" for "situation". Even "diss" for "disrespect". And while we're on the subject of this latter word, when did it become a verb?

bombergirl69
05-17-2016, 04:16 PM
Seminal.

Unless used in a medical setting. Hate relating creative, innovative, groundbreaking ideas to...semen?

I don't see it written as much (thank God) but when I hear it used-his seminal work-my mind just blots out whatever the speaker (usually someone with semen) is saying.

robeiae
05-17-2016, 05:10 PM
Even "diss" for "disrespect". And while we're on the subject of this latter word, when did it become a verb?
A long time ago, actually. Hundreds of years. I don't care for it much, either, but only when used in an imperative: "Don't you disrespect me!" Yuck

In contrast, "He was disrespected by his peers," doesn't bother me at all.

Ravioli
05-17-2016, 05:17 PM
Oh! "Amazing"! My old pet peeve word, because people use it too easily, or are they so easily amused that everything actually amazes them?

My neighbour always greets in passing, she is amazing!
Want to work in an amazing atmosphere? Like, garden variety sales office?
Amazing job opportunity! More fradulent forexing!
This store-bought breadroll is amazing! It's soft on the inside and beige out!
They have 3 children, they are amazing people! We never talked!
You remembered my birthday, you're amazing! I'm pathetic!
She's a totally nondescript person, so I dunno while I'm screeching that she's amazingly talented just because I like her! I don't know what talents I'm talking about either, she's just nice!
I've had an amazing date! We sat down for coffee and talked! I should get a cat.

And usually pronounced "Amaaaaaaaayyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyziiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiing (-ah)!" because that average apple pie and its mediocre creator totally earned that adjective.

GOD DAMN IT BAN THIS WORD MAKE IT PUNISHABLE BY LIFE IN SOLITARY OMFG!!!!!!!!!

Albedo
05-17-2016, 05:30 PM
Stakeholders.

America's Proust
05-17-2016, 06:29 PM
Definitely "You go, girl." That just needs to go. Away. Far away. Forever. And never bother us again.

mirandashell
05-17-2016, 06:36 PM
I did have a bloke on another forum tell me, a woman, about the effects of PMS on a woman.

No seriously, he did. And there is no better description for that than 'mansplaining'.

But I do agree it can be used incorrectly as a stick to beat a man with.

Snowstorm
05-17-2016, 07:00 PM
This is literally the most taxing thread ever.

Gah! We're on the same page. In the past few months I keep seeing literally used so much and used incorrectly. "I was going to literally explode..."

Sophia
05-17-2016, 07:08 PM
Stakeholders.

Yes! As if there's something wrong with "vampire slayer".

Gilroy Cullen
05-17-2016, 07:18 PM
Bae. Unless you're speaking Dutch (I think it's Dutch. Google Translate won't recognize it as anything but English now. Bastards.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bJzjMsiIKuk -- For those wanting a good laugh. Bill Engvall's take on Awesome.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Gv0H-vPoDc -- And this Weird Al video seems appropriate here... :D

mirandashell
05-17-2016, 07:42 PM
That Weird Al video is genius!

regdog
05-17-2016, 07:48 PM
Phht, CassMcCassface has Lake Superior State beaten. Her list is 34 AW pages long (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?296200-Cutesie-wootsie-overused-and-or-trendy-expressions-I-d-like-to-kill-with-fire)
As writers we're either fussy about annoying words, or those of us who hang in Office Party
are just looking for ways to waste time. 34 pages.

CassandraW
05-17-2016, 07:50 PM
Phht, CassMcCassface has Lake Superior State beaten. Her list is 34 AW pages long (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?296200-Cutesie-wootsie-overused-and-or-trendy-expressions-I-d-like-to-kill-with-fire)

Of course, at least one of those pages is devoted to how much people hate the word "hack."

L. OBrien
05-17-2016, 08:22 PM
I will admit that our society has become rather fond of calling literally everything that we do a hack (maybe so that we feel like badass tech wizards while saving money on our groceries?), though I had not realized quite how much ire the h word had drawn, or that it had been abused for so long.

nighttimer
05-17-2016, 08:49 PM
I have been informed many times by my son that the word "cheesy" is an abomination. I just can't seem to find another word. Suggestions are welcome.

My daughter has been saying "janky" (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=janky) a lot. I don't know what it means but she seems to.

Try it on your son and see how he reacts, Mom. :Wha:


So.... speaking as a non-American .......

WTF is a noogie?

Google "noogie". All will be revealed.

Personally, I'd like to stuff "brah" and "bro" and all its variations into a sack and drown it in a deep well.

Ravioli
05-17-2016, 08:55 PM
Grrl.
It's not because she's a girl with oomph - another word I hate, I don't wanna suddenly sound like I'm being chloroformed - that you gotta mix the noun with an animal. It's also kinda derogatory considering the things making a "grrl" would never be considered unusual for males.

And "slay". It isn't used for killing these days, but simply to describe witty but inconsequential comebacks to stupid comments on the internet. "She slayed the haters!" - did she? She tweeted a comeback. Nothing happened. Nobody apologized. Nobody had a change of heart. Go away.

Fruitbat
05-17-2016, 08:57 PM
New ones to me are "basic bitch," "THOT," and "ratchet." I know they are my punishment for watching Vanderpump Rules and I deserve them. Okay, I like them. :p

Rolling Thunder
05-17-2016, 09:25 PM
Yes. Hummer is a better word.

And don't confuse noogie with nookie. Totally different rub.

Kylabelle
05-17-2016, 09:38 PM
I used to innocently use "hummer" as a cute nickname for a hummingbird. Then, I learned. Now, I can only use it that way among certain people who remain as innocent as I was (and use it that way first.)

Rolling Thunder
05-17-2016, 09:41 PM
Well, both uses involve a bird...

c.e.lawson
05-17-2016, 11:12 PM
I've noticed that NPR tends to use the exact words and phrases that are trendy and irksome. (not to be too critical of NPR, they do maintain my sanity during long commutes) A few years ago they were saying this thing that bugged me - "very sort of". They used that all the time. Decreasing frequency now, but for a while, UGH.

Ex: David Bowie's music reflected what seemed to be a very sort of alienated view of existence.

They are now doing this really relaxed-conversational thing when speaking with experts. The experts very often begin their answers with the "so" that is on the ban list above.
Ex:
Host: Traffic in downtown Los Angeles has seemed to worsen over the past year.
Guest Expert: Right, Alex. Sooo...we've completed a formal traffic survey blah blah blah.

Roxxsmom
05-17-2016, 11:24 PM
I've noticed that NPR tends to use the exact words and phrases that are trendy and irksome. (not to be too critical of NPR, they do maintain my sanity during long commutes) A few years ago they were saying this thing that bugged me - "very sort of". They used that all the time. Decreasing frequency now, but for a while, UGH.

Yes, they really do. I like their news overall (I also listen to it when driving to and from work), but this can get a bit annoying at times.

Which reminds me, I loathe the word (and concept of) "hipster."

bombergirl69
05-17-2016, 11:26 PM
Closure.

Another word I hate. Most psychobabble ---- > self actualize, borderline (outside of a very narrow clinical setting), incentivize, significant relationship, processing, fear-based...and so many more!!!!!

Roxxsmom
05-17-2016, 11:34 PM
Since it came up in another thread, I really dislike the terms "alpha male" etc.

America's Proust
05-18-2016, 01:14 AM
I also hate the following: "twerk," "turnt up," and "selfie." These terrible excuses for words need to be marched off the cliff into the ravine and subsequently machine-gunned while Wagner's "Flight of the Valkyries" plays on a loudspeaker in the background.

Bolero
05-18-2016, 01:31 AM
Paradigm shift when used in a management context. (Another one for the exaggerated language category.)

Plus a general moan about management buzzwords, though there is always buzzword bingo to relieve your feelings on that.
http://dilbert.com/search_results?terms=Buzzword+Bingo

c.e.lawson
05-18-2016, 01:54 AM
I think it interesting how many of the words we have mentioned here are from a business context. Maybe we just hate work and are transferring that resentment to our colleagues' vocabularies. Heh.

Noizchild
05-18-2016, 01:58 AM
Lol and yolo.

Roxxsmom
05-18-2016, 02:20 AM
I think it interesting how many of the words we have mentioned here are from a business context. Maybe we just hate work and are transferring that resentment to our colleagues' vocabularies. Heh.

I think so. I especially resent the seepage of these words when they make me feel like that business mindset I loathe (and pursued an academic career to avoid) is contaminating my workplace.

Another source of loathed words is cutsie-poo pop culture and culturally appropriated dance moves (like twerk, which I hate with a fiery hatred). You know something has ceased to be cool and is forever ruined for the people who invented it when there are videos of "twerking" toddlers (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eShGFiPC9EQ) with bulging diapers on you tube. Kind of like the 80s when "break dancing" children were suddenly selling breakfast cereal during Saturday morning cartoons.

c.e.lawson
05-18-2016, 03:36 AM
I think so. I especially resent the seepage of these words when they make me feel like that business mindset I loathe (and pursued an academic career to avoid) is contaminating my workplace.

I know! I love being an independent contractor because I mind my own business (literally), but my husband (also a doc) works for a big company and he gets this stuff drummed into him constantly. It's annoying. Of course we don't complain about the benefits, though...:)

shivadyne
05-18-2016, 11:26 AM
Grrl.
It's not because she's a girl with oomph - another word I hate, I don't wanna suddenly sound like I'm being chloroformed - that you gotta mix the noun with an animal. It's also kinda derogatory considering the things making a "grrl" would never be considered unusual for males.

i've never seen anyone use "grrl" until this post in all honesty. it's always "gurl" whenever someone changes up the spelling of the word. oh! and someone told me they've seen it spelled as "grill" too? odd.

Roxxsmom
05-18-2016, 11:30 AM
I've seen it used with reference to "grrrl power," bit it's not something I've seen much of lately. It was one of those trendy internet things for a while. I never gave it much thought, but I guess "grrrl" made the word feel tougher than girl?

I tend to be annoyed by adult women being called "girls" anyway, outside of contexts when adult men would actually be called "boys."

- - - Updated - - -

I've seen it used with reference to "grrrl power," bit it's not something I've seen much of lately. It was one of those trendy internet things for a while. I never gave it much thought, but I guess "grrrl" made the word feel tougher than girl?

I tend to be annoyed by adult women being called "girls" anyway, outside of contexts when adult men would actually be called "boys."

shivadyne
05-18-2016, 11:34 AM
I tend to be annoyed by adult women being called "girls" anyway, outside of contexts when adult men would actually be called "boys."

yeah, i've noticed the terms "guys" and "girls" are usually thrown around in the same sentence. i switch "girls" out with "gals" in that case to avoid calling adult women children essentially.

Samsonet
05-18-2016, 11:44 AM
"Riot Grrl" is the name of a feminist punk (movement? zine? something). I've only heard about it from other people.

Lillith1991
05-18-2016, 11:57 AM
New ones to me are "basic bitch," "THOT," and "ratchet." I know they are my punishment for watching Vanderpump Rules and I deserve them. Okay, I like them. :p

Thot is actually a Cambodian word/slang adopted by English speakers. It means the same thing as slut or whore. Though it really, really is stupid when that's the only Khmer word in the damn sentence.

Roxxsmom
05-18-2016, 12:32 PM
"Riot Grrl" is the name of a feminist punk (movement? zine? something). I've only heard about it from other people.

I've heard of it, but I always assumed that the use of the term "grrl" predated this particular context. No?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riot_grrrl

Sophia
05-18-2016, 01:13 PM
oh! and someone told me they've seen it spelled as "grill" too? odd.

'Grill' is common on Twitch. It's one of several deliberate misspellings that are part of the culture. I quite like it. :)

mirandashell
05-18-2016, 03:34 PM
Riot Grrrl:

https://www.google.co.uk/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&rlz=1C1CHWA_enGB632GB632&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=riot%20grrl

Quite a big international movement at one point. Still has its effects in the same way Punk does on those who there at the start. More of a mindset than a lifestyle.

Chrissy
05-18-2016, 04:23 PM
I remember being very small and hearing my dad tell of a fellow who wrote "I like grils" on some public signage. Then someone else came along, crossed out "grils" and wrote "girls." Then someone else came along and wrote, "what about us grils?" And Dad laughed and laughed. I was so confused, I remember wondering how a grill could use a pencil.

DancingMaenid
05-18-2016, 06:02 PM
I think the blog Cake Wrecks featured a cake once that was supposed to say "It's a Girl," bUT instead said "It a Gril."

Anyway, two words/phrases I hate are "bae" and "on point." I associate both with the same subculture that's super into the Kardashians and other superficial celebrity stuff.

kuwisdelu
05-18-2016, 08:40 PM
I've seen it used with reference to "grrrl power," bit it's not something I've seen much of lately. It was one of those trendy internet things for a while. I never gave it much thought, but I guess "grrrl" made the word feel tougher than girl?[/COLOR]

I've seen it used with reference to "grrrl power," bit it's not something I've seen much of lately. It was one of those trendy internet things for a while. I never gave it much thought, but I guess "grrrl" made the word feel tougher than girl?


"Riot Grrl" is the name of a feminist punk (movement? zine? something). I've only heard about it from other people.

Yep, Riot Grrrls was feminist punk movement in the 90s, centering around underground zines and punk rock bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile.

Samsonet
05-18-2016, 09:10 PM
I've heard of it, but I always assumed that the use of the term "grrl" predated this particular context. No?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riot_grrrl

I wouldn't know. :) It's the earliest use I know of, at least.

robeiae
05-18-2016, 09:31 PM
I'm pretty sure "grrrl" is Welsh.

blacbird
05-18-2016, 10:11 PM
I'm pretty sure "grrrl" is Welsh.

Nope. Not enough "l"s.

caw

jlmott
05-18-2016, 11:13 PM
Apologies to Jeff Bridges, but I want to ban the word "dude", mainly because the guy sitting next to me at work says it at least 500 times any given day. And when I say mainly, I mean that's really the only reason. And when I say I want to ban the word, I mean I really just want to punch the guy in the head, but banning the word at least won't get me fired. That sounds reasonable, doesn't it?

Bolero
05-19-2016, 01:52 PM
All of those struggling at work - you want to chill out on Despair.com - a delightful source of demotivational posters.
http://despair.com/collections/posters

And these sweatshirts are good too - https://www.pinterest.com/pin/54817320440928808/



And if you're allowed to wear headphones and listen to background music at work, it really, really helps. I had a selection of stuff busy enough to block other noises but no songs (because I listened to the words.)

Rolling Thunder
05-20-2016, 07:04 PM
Oh look, a new fun word!

http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/3-risks-wall-street-is-underestimating/ar-BBtfwZz?li=BBnbfcN#page=3

Brexit. Brrrrexit.

Kylabelle
05-20-2016, 07:28 PM
Sounds like the name of a toothpaste for reptiles.

Gilroy Cullen
05-20-2016, 08:59 PM
That's as bad as Brangelina...

thepicpic
05-22-2016, 09:49 AM
Oh look, a new fun word!

http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/3-risks-wall-street-is-underestimating/ar-BBtfwZz?li=BBnbfcN#page=3

Brexit. Brrrrexit.

Two things annoy me about the term. One, that my foolish foolish government is actually considering it. Two, the word sounds a) like some sort of cereal that would give me an intolerance reaction and b) like something a three year old would come up with.

Zaffiro
05-27-2016, 03:11 AM
the word sounds a) like some sort of cereal that would give me an intolerance reaction and b) like something a three year old would come up with.

Oh God yes. If there isn't enough room in your brain for the whole four syllables of 'British exit', maybe you shouldn't be sharing your opinions on it.

Cutesy portmanteau words are bad enough when they're about celebrity gossip - 'Brangelina', pass the barf bag - but when you're talking about a real, serious political issue with real, serious consequences, it's just cringeworthy. I know you think it makes you sound snappy and hip and like totes down with tha kidz, but it really, really doesn't.

Kylabelle
05-27-2016, 05:00 PM
And now we have Brexiteer! (http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-eu-referendum-36396066)

Don't be one. Or, be one. Get the t-shirt.

:greenie

Rolling Thunder
05-27-2016, 05:39 PM
My old dictionary is wet. I believe the poor thing has been silently weeping...

thepicpic
05-28-2016, 10:30 AM
And now we have Brexiteer! (http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-eu-referendum-36396066)

Don't be one. Or, be one. Get the t-shirt.

:greenie


Bah.

That is all.

Kylabelle
05-28-2016, 01:57 PM
Soon, there will be offspring. Brexiteering can't be long in arriving.

thepicpic
05-29-2016, 10:20 AM
Why do you do this to me?

If things get really bad, they may even form the Three Brexiteers.

Kylabelle
05-29-2016, 02:02 PM
Why do you do this to me?

If things get really bad, they may even form the Three Brexiteers.


:roll:

BajaSun
06-04-2016, 03:01 AM
I've seen it used with reference to "grrrl power," bit it's not something I've seen much of lately. It was one of those trendy internet things for a while. I never gave it much thought, but I guess "grrrl" made the word feel tougher than girl?

I tend to be annoyed by adult women being called "girls" anyway, outside of contexts when adult men would actually be called "boys."

- - - Updated - - -

I've seen it used with reference to "grrrl power," bit it's not something I've seen much of lately. It was one of those trendy internet things for a while. I never gave it much thought, but I guess "grrrl" made the word feel tougher than girl?

I tend to be annoyed by adult women being called "girls" anyway, outside of contexts when adult men would actually be called "boys."

-----------
You can call me "girl" any day of the week; just don't dare address me as, "Ma'am." Now there's a word deserving of the trash bin.

Also, the most odious words on my list, beginning with: Foodie. I hate that word. Makes me think of a glutton who thinks of nothing else besides food. Someone ban this word, please!

I, too, hate the word, "cheesy." It just brings to mind something really distasteful. Ugh.

Someone else expressed a dislike for the word "gift" used as a verb. It could be worse, I think, and that would be the ubiquitous oxymoron, "Free gift."

"Conversation" is definitely in the too-much category now, as well. This, for instance, just gets annoying: "Yes, it is definitely a conversation we need to have."
And, "I don't want to have that conversation at this time."

With respect to the number of expressions and/or unusual words that originate in the corporate or business world: This does seem to be the rule, rather than the exception. It only takes a few talking heads, pundits and sportscasters to grab those words and splash them around on their television broadcasts in order to create another round of trendy buzzwords.

DexyDoo
06-05-2016, 12:39 AM
-----------
Also, the most odious words on my list, beginning with: Foodie. I hate that word. Makes me think of a glutton who thinks of nothing else besides food. Someone ban this word, please!


I don't like foodie either.
And irregardless drives me nuts.

Hattingmad
06-05-2016, 12:44 AM
And irregardless drives me nuts.

Oh, god, it burns. Don't ever. EVER. It's regardless, dangit.

Can I also submit "ATM machine", "HIV virus" and the phrase "we need to talk"? Nothing good has EVER come out of those words in that order.

DexyDoo
06-05-2016, 12:48 AM
Can I also submit "ATM machine"

Oh yes. Please!

Gilroy Cullen
06-05-2016, 01:25 AM
Oh, god, it burns. Don't ever. EVER. It's regardless, dangit.

Can I also submit "ATM machine", "HIV virus" and the phrase "we need to talk"? Nothing good has EVER come out of those words in that order.

Don't forget "PIN number"

Hattingmad
06-05-2016, 01:30 AM
Don't forget "PIN number"

Noooo, don't remind me. I hear that one all the time!

M.S. Wiggins
06-05-2016, 01:54 AM
Vacillate and masticate. I cringe when hearing people use either of these words in everyday speech.

However, I do adore a certain word they rhyme with. ;)

aleighrose
06-05-2016, 03:28 AM
"Totes" instead of "totally" - It's more the attitude behind it that bugs me than the abbreviation itself.

"Going forward" - Overused, particularly in sports. Add some variety by saying "in the future" or "from now on" or anything other than those same two words over and over again.

"Shoot me an email" - Do you really want me to shoot it at you? I gladly would at this point. It feels like office employees say this to seem more laid back and fun. Enough of the charade! You're a business person; of course you're not laid back and fun. Your job is a slow, endless spiral of despair during which you are imprisoned in an unstimulating, soul-crushing chamber of hell known as an office. Embrace it and say to each of your equally dull coworkers in your most unenthusiastic voice, "Email me."

Emermouse
06-05-2016, 05:40 AM
Okay, haven't read through the entire thread, so I apologize if my remarks are inaccurate. I did search and I am shocked and appalled that no one mentioned the word, "metrosexual." For some reason that word just appeared way the hell out of nowhere, with all the newspapers and magazines using it as though it was common knowledge and everyone understood what it meant. Took me forever to figure it out though. I kept being like "Is this a word used to refer to someone who is in love with cities, like spends all their time looking at subway maps and being like, 'Just look at the extensive public transportation and thriving art scene this city has?'" Was so shocked to discover that apparently the word "metrosexual" refers to a guy who spends a lot of time on grooming, making himself look all pretty, and stuff, which actually makes me hate the term even more. We already have words for men like that, ones that are a lot less linguistically confusing than metrosexual. Call them fops or dandies instead.

But thankfully that term seems to have died out.

Hattingmad
06-05-2016, 05:48 AM
Call them fops or dandies instead.

But thankfully that term seems to have died out.

Fops and dandies are some of the best words to come out of the comedy of manners era. I wish they were still in use today. Heck, bring back foppish fashion. It's no more ridiculous than half the stuff I see on runways!

shivadyne
06-05-2016, 10:52 AM
Can I also submit "ATM machine", "HIV virus" and the phrase "we need to talk"?

rip in peace


"Totes" instead of "totally" - It's more the attitude behind it that bugs me than the abbreviation itself

i say totes all the time. i feel like a lot of terms teenage girls tend to use get unnecessary hate.

Samsonet
06-05-2016, 11:36 AM
I can't use LOL without feeling like I've just killed a bunny.

PeteMC
06-05-2016, 06:39 PM
Yes. Hummer is a better word.



I used to innocently use "hummer" as a cute nickname for a hummingbird. Then, I learned. Now, I can only use it that way among certain people who remain as innocent as I was (and use it that way first.)

Er, I thought a Hummer was one of those faux-military SUVs. Enlighten me?

Also, this one I came across the other day - what in the world is "resting bitch face"?

mirandashell
06-05-2016, 06:56 PM
Resting bitch face applies to people whose faces have a severe expression when they are not showing any emotion. Like this:

http://www.pleated-jeans.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/938998.jpg

buz
06-05-2016, 07:01 PM
Also, this one I came across the other day - what in the world is "resting bitch face"?

It's when you're just walking around and people say things to you like "smile!" or "is something wrong?" or just don't dare to approach you because you look plain unapproachable (the latter of which, tbh, is fine for me 99% of the time :D ) or you try to take a passport photo with a "neutral expression" and find that all of your neutral expressions are not neutral-looking . . . :p

mirandashell
06-05-2016, 07:14 PM
That 'Smile!' from strangers does my head in! I once burst into tears and wailed 'my Nan just died...... wahhh.....' when a bloke said that to me on the street. He ran away.

She hadn't just died, in case you're wondering. ;)

lianna williamson
06-05-2016, 07:32 PM
Ditto. Resting bitch face is when the "neutral" expression your face defaults to appears angry/pissy/worried to others. The word "bitch" is not coincidental, as this phenomenon is less acceptable in female faces, which are apparently expected wear shampoo-ad smiles all the freaking time so, as Celine puts it in the film Before Sunrise, "men can feel better about their own crappy lives."

PeteMC
06-05-2016, 07:41 PM
Oh, I see. I, uh, I think I suffer from that myself!

lianna williamson
06-05-2016, 07:44 PM
Many people do! I think in men it translates into them being perceived as mean and/or scary. I have an ex who was a big, very muscular guy, and had this natural crease between his brows that made it look like he was scowling every moment he wasn't smiling brightly. People were terrified of him.

aleighrose
06-05-2016, 09:36 PM
"creeper" instead of "creep" - "That guy is such a creeper!" No, he isn't. A creeper is a vine. That guy is just a creep (unless he has vines growing out of him, in which case, he's both). When did people start adding the "-er" to the end?

LOL, OMG, and any other text lingo when spoken - I have no problem seeing these acronyms in writing, but when people say them in a face-to-face conversation, it just sounds stupid. My sister does this all the time, and it makes me want to scream, "You're 38 years old; knock it off!"

harmonyisarine
06-05-2016, 10:09 PM
That 'Smile!' from strangers does my head in! I once burst into tears and wailed 'my Nan just died...... wahhh.....' when a bloke said that to me on the street. He ran away.

She hadn't just died, in case you're wondering. ;)

The backstory is that I am a borderline victim of RBF, so the slightest not-happy emotion throws me over the edge from "maybe she's upset?" (my neutral) into full bitch face, even if I'm not that upset. On this day, my driver to an off campus class was ten minutes late AND randomly changed the parking lot she picked me up in, so I had to rush to the new spot or everyone would be late. This was mildly annoying and apparently activated the bitch face.

"Wow, crack a smile. You look like your dog died. ~laughter from everyone~"
"No. It was my great-nani [grandmother]."
"~white faces all around~"

I wasn't that upset about her death (she was 97 and had a full life), but it got them to stop that "Just smile!" crap.

mirandashell
06-06-2016, 01:30 AM
:D Works a treat, don't it?

Hattingmad
06-06-2016, 01:35 AM
The "my ____ just died" definitely works! I do wish I could just say "I don't exist to make you feel better about yourself", but I think it would go over their heads.

buz
06-06-2016, 02:00 AM
The worst thing is that when people go "smile!" at me my instinctual response is nervous laughter.

Which only reinforces their bad behavior.

It's like giving a dog a piece of bacon every time it poops in your bed.

I am part of the problem

PeteMC
06-06-2016, 02:02 AM
Many people do! I think in men it translates into them being perceived as mean and/or scary. I have an ex who was a big, very muscular guy, and had this natural crease between his brows that made it look like he was scowling every moment he wasn't smiling brightly. People were terrified of him.

Heh, I'm not that muscular anymore but I have the same sort of face - this is me:

https://talonwraith.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/peter-mclean-1-p19goripnm6vk2q3c3rufj1pdv1-225x300.jpg

neandermagnon
06-06-2016, 02:28 AM
Okay, haven't read through the entire thread, so I apologize if my remarks are inaccurate. I did search and I am shocked and appalled that no one mentioned the word, "metrosexual."

I also hate this word. The absolute worst use of this word I've come across was in an online article that said that neanderthal men were "metrosexual" because they made clothes. Never mind the fact that they lived in Europe through the ice ages and without the ability to tan hides and make them into basic clothes they would've frozen to death. Never mind the fact that "metrosexual" is a fucking stupid word based on cultural norms that didn't arise until tens of thousands of years after neanderthals went extinct... they're metrosexual.

This here forensically reconstructed neanderthal woman succinctly sums up what I think about that. (https://cavepeopleandstuff.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/neanderthalreconstructiongermanynobackground2.jpg) (And about gender stereotypes generally)


As for resting bitch face, I have resting crazy-spear-wielding-neanderthal-lady face.

mirandashell
06-06-2016, 02:57 AM
The worst thing is that when people go "smile!" at me my instinctual response is nervous laughter.

That's cos you are a nice person. Whereas I actually am a bitch.......


;)

buz
06-06-2016, 03:23 AM
That's cos you are a nice person. Whereas I actually am a bitch.......


;)

No, I'm just slow-witted. ;)

Roxxsmom
06-06-2016, 03:25 AM
...and the phrase "we need to talk"? Nothing good has EVER come out of those words in that order.

Seriously. Why doesn't anyone ever "need to talk" about how pleased they are with the work you've been doing, or their desire to give you a raise, or about how much they love your personality quirks, or about how well your relationship is going?

thepicpic
06-06-2016, 11:38 AM
We need to talk? Crap. Err, I'm busy ironing my dog. Run!

Even that pales into insignificance to my instinctive terror whenever anyone needs 'to ask you something'. I have never had a talk that ended well when it begins with that.

As to faces, I have perfected the art of resting death glare.

blacbird
06-07-2016, 03:54 AM
the phrase "we need to talk"? Nothing good has EVER come out of those words in that order.

I recall a great cartoon I saw (might have been a Larson "Far Side"), in which the caveman's wife comes up to him as he's squatting by the fire, and says "We need to talk". The cartoon was labeled "The Origin of Speech".

caw

L.C. Blackwell
07-10-2016, 12:39 PM
As a word that ought to be banned from cookbooks forever (I'm looking at you, Taste of Home), "hearty" is at the top of my list. I've never seen an adjective so meaninglessly overused.

Brukaviador
07-12-2016, 12:58 AM
Looking back to the original post, one of the words on the list - so - is there because it's just a filler word. 95% of the time it can be removed without changing the meaning of the sentence.

I have a hitlist of similar words I scour my nearly finished works for, and usually remove:
Just, so, very, ever, even, really, quite, and that (this last one's a 50/50).

It's especially annoying/obnoxious/wasteful/etc. to use them together.
"It doesn't even really matter."
"I'm just so very happy to see you."

KCT
07-12-2016, 01:56 PM
Whenever I see the word - Rexaluckaniac - it makes me want to pull my hair out in aggravation, but this is the first time I've seen it because it has already been banished.

Dennis E. Taylor
07-12-2016, 07:01 PM
Wait, how do you use ask as a noun? Gimme an ask? I've got an ask for next time I see Grandpa?

Yep. It gets used at work a lot.

"It's a big ask, but we have to consider it..."

I tear up every time.


Meanwhile, my irritation du jour is "flushing out" as in "flushing out a character." When did this start happening? I actually had to go on the googley to make sure I hadn't been mis-remembering all my life.

You flesh out a character. You flush out something that's hiding.

Grrrr...

stormie
07-12-2016, 07:21 PM
"crazy good"

"crazy fast"

Anything where "crazy" means "very"

Makes me crazy.

stormie
07-14-2016, 09:22 PM
Another one (actually two words): "It was amazingly crazy!"

Or the repeated use of "sooooo" in an FB or Twitter post: "It was sooooo great! Thank you soooo much for the amazingly crazy time!"

Okay. That's it. My brain is fried from this!

StuToYou
07-22-2016, 10:30 PM
Kaleidoscope

Gossamer

Cacophony

Translucent

Ethereal

Wispy

Indeterminate

Perfunctory

Shambolic

Succor

Resplendent

Amorphous

Amorous

Archaic

And


(I've used them all, more than trice.)

Trice.

mirandashell
07-22-2016, 11:30 PM
Trice?

shakeysix
07-22-2016, 11:39 PM
Tepid. It's so...tepid. --s6

PeskyRedhead
07-22-2016, 11:45 PM
Can we talk about banning "reactionary"?
Not in the political sense... but the people who use it when they mean reactive. If we have to ban it entirely, that works, too, because "Make America Great Again."

Whenever someone in my office says they were very "reactionary" I want to scream, "What?? Like Franco or the Vichy government???"
But I don't.

StuToYou
07-23-2016, 05:14 AM
Trice?
with and without the 'h'. ;)

PeskyRedhead
07-23-2016, 06:43 AM
Hey now... trice is a good old word! It's been around for centuries. Leave it alone! =)

zmethos
07-24-2016, 12:54 AM
I'm more than done with "awesomesauce" and "amazeballs."