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William Haskins
01-29-2016, 05:29 AM
Never is a clever word,
so absolute and ruthless,
so distant and forbidding,
hidden far beyond the end
of a neverending hallway,
secreted behind a door,
locked and leading nowhere.

Never is measured in madness,
in imagined possibility,
the will to best infinity,
to triumph over time and be
liberated from the longing
of that which we cannot taste,
but waste instead in dreams.

What curious courage does drive a man
to wait forever for never?

kborsden
01-29-2016, 01:07 PM
You're rocking the metre on this one :D.

I like the thoughtful supposition and its minor meander. It's an interesting, and cleverly composed piece, but i'd drop the closing question... there doesn't seem to be a logical lead into it--almost like it's a question secular to the actual poem but added to offer support for the poem's authorship. Maybe that's intended. I dunno. I do know I like and enjoyed the poem on the whole.

Smirkin
01-30-2016, 12:48 AM
I agree completely - I was hanging on every word until that last question.

Maybe "foreboding" instead of forbidding? Might set up a nice echo with "door" later on.

Big fan here! :)

Sarita
01-30-2016, 02:00 AM
I often wonder why humans (myself included) spend so much of their time doing things they don't enjoy when the eventuality is an eternity of nothingness. I swear, I'll only quote the bible to sound like a heretic. "Eat, drink, for tomorrow we shall die!" And that's where this poem lands me. Square in the middle of "Fuck this week! I'm quitting my job and writing... But I'll never be this good, so I might as well keep the job. And forget about writing. But fuck this week anyway."

It goes without saying that your language is superb. Even though I just said it.

Perks
01-30-2016, 02:29 AM
What I like is that it turns the word "never" right on its head. I've always thought of it as a brick wall dropped right in front of your nose. But it's not, is it? It's absolutely a demand to contemplate eternity - an eternity without, for good or for ill, something in particular.

wonderactivist
01-30-2016, 06:18 PM
The poem is straightforward and made me think about something important. Awesome. I was okay with the rhetorical question though don't think you need it to create that question in my mind.

Maybe it's just me but the title alone did not entice me—and titles are important like that. Not a Greek scholar or cosmologist, I had to go online to find apeiron's meaning when it wasn't in either my paper American Heritage College Dictionary or my iPad app from Dictionary.com. So I guess I'm saying as a reader it put me off, but again it could be just me. Maybe consider a subtitle? Just a thought, please take with salt.

I appreciate both the consciousness-widening effect of the poem and your sharing it, Lucie

CassandraW
01-30-2016, 07:23 PM
What I like is that it turns the word "never" right on its head. I've always thought of it as a brick wall dropped right in front of your nose. But it's not, is it? It's absolutely a demand to contemplate eternity - an eternity without, for good or for ill, something in particular.

Yes, this was my feeling. I would love to know what prompted this, but of course, William will never tell us. I must contemplate eternity without knowing.

I love the title; I'm immersed in Greek stuff, so I knew what it meant, and in any case I never mind looking up a word.

(I'm traveling and reading on a phone, so you'll all be spared my lengthy ramblings for a change. )