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WriterFantasyNights
01-25-2016, 04:51 PM
Here are some questions that I have:


The first, when becoming published, do you need an agent?

And to get agents, do you need the writers and artists yearbook?

What is the publisher looking for in a manuscript? A sharp, edited clear drawn story?


And how does a writer get up with big publishers and small publishers? Which is the better choice?

How do I avoid '' fake agents'' and '' bad publishers''?

What makes a good opening letter to an agent?

What makes a good synopiss to an agent?

What should I add in it that the agent be impressed by?

How can I make it short and lean? How do I know to address letters to a publisher when I do not know their name and infact, how can I sound professional in front of them?

This is kinda my attitude when I will later on start the process.

And the other part is I expect to get rejections the first time and keep on sending until I get accepted. That's my goal, to get rejected thousands of time and then become published because sooner or later I will get picked up. But that won't stop me from editing and sharpening my manuscript. I want to get published, and I want to write such a book that the publisher should say '' yes now that's a book I can sell. ''. The first thing is that my manuscript should be the number one priority. Get that fixed and then I can send them to agents. If I like my manuscript, chances are it could be picked up. But I want to make sure that the book is everything.

Kerosene
01-25-2016, 05:10 PM
The first, when becoming published, do you need an agent?

Need? No. Should probably have? Depends. Agents are middlemen, but sometimes they have specific "ins" to publishers who otherwise don't accept unagented submissions (like the Big ones). Mostly they are for so you don't get screwed over; the agents works for you and your work to get the best deals from publishers, which you can do on your own with a literary attorney, but that starts becoming more of a hassle. Since you're asking, if you're trying for big publishers, you should get one. With respected small pubs and e-pubs, many agents don't bother with them and you shouldn't bother getting an agent for them. Try for agents first and when you've run the list of them down, then submit to small publishers directly and deal with them yourself.


And to get agents, do you need the writers and artists yearbook?

You certainly don't need it; you can find all the same info online. But it can help a bit if you're willing to buy it. I've heard you can sometimes find them in libraries.


What is the publisher looking for in a manuscript? A sharp, edited clear drawn story?

For fiction? Completely finished, and edited to the best of your abilities. The should ensure the product (your work) should edited even better, but to even get an agent interested your work should appear like it's been written by a good writer--thus, finished and edited. Although this doesn't mean you should go out and pay an editor.


And how does a writer get up with big publishers and small publishers? Which is the better choice?

Unless you have specific tastes in publishers or a niche market, big publishers are the way to go. Small pubs aren't bad comparatively and can be a great place to start.


How do I avoid '' fake agents'' and '' bad publishers''?

By doing your research.


What makes a good opening letter to an agent?

Read the stickies in Query Letter Hell.


What makes a good synopiss to an agent?

Read the stickies in Query Letter Hell.


What should I add in it that the agent be impressed by?

Things that they would be impressed by in relation to your writing. If you don't have any, don't bother.


How can I make it short and lean? How do I know to address letters to a publisher when I do not know their name and infact, how can I sound professional in front of them?

Read the stickies in Query Letter Hell.

Read up on all the stickies in the Publishing sub-forum (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?8-Publishing)and all the stickies in Query Letter Hell (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?174-Query-Letter-Hell-SYW).


And the other part is I expect to get rejections the first time and keep on sending until I get accepted. That's my goal, to get rejected thousands of time and then become published because sooner or later I will get picked up. But that won't stop me from editing and sharpening my manuscript. I want to get published, and I want to write such a book that the publisher should say '' yes now that's a book I can sell. ''. The first thing is that my manuscript should be the number one priority. Get that fixed and then I can send them to agents. If I like my manuscript, chances are it could be picked up. But I want to make sure that the book is everything.

Just make sure you don't query to an agent or submit to a publisher again after you've received a rejection within a year or two. It's good to be tenacious, but not repetitive without thought.

mayqueen
01-25-2016, 08:38 PM
A lot of your questions are going to require you to do a lot of research (here and elsewhere on the internet) and do some soul-searching about what your career goals as a writer are.


Here are some questions that I have:


The first, when becoming published, do you need an agent? I don't know what "becoming" means here, sorry. As in, you have a publication deal already or as in you are seeking a deal? Either way, this is one of those do your research and do some soul-searching questions. For a major trade deal, you will in most cases need an agent first. For a small press, you might need an agent, you might not. After that, there are various different reasons to have or not have an agent. Research what an agent does and that will help (hint: much more than securing the deal in the first place).

And to get agents, do you need the writers and artists yearbook? No. Do your research. There are many places to find agents to query.

What is the publisher looking for in a manuscript? A sharp, edited clear drawn story? Do you research for your genre and the kinds of publishers you'd like to reach. Each one is going to vary, but yes, the bottom line is a well-written, well-edited story.


And how does a writer get up with big publishers and small publishers? Which is the better choice? It depends on your goals. This is a do your research and do some soul-searching question.

How do I avoid '' fake agents'' and '' bad publishers''? Guess what I'm going to say! Do your research. :) Google them. Check them out here and at Preditors and Editors.

What makes a good opening letter to an agent? Hie thee to Query Letter Hell.

What makes a good synopiss to an agent? Hie thee to Query Letter Hell.

What should I add in it that the agent be impressed by? Hie thee to Query Letter Hell!

How can I make it short and lean? How do I know to address letters to a publisher when I do not know their name and infact, how can I sound professional in front of them? QLH.

This is kinda my attitude when I will later on start the process.

And the other part is I expect to get rejections the first time and keep on sending until I get accepted. That's my goal, to get rejected thousands of time and then become published because sooner or later I will get picked up. But that won't stop me from editing and sharpening my manuscript. I want to get published, and I want to write such a book that the publisher should say '' yes now that's a book I can sell. ''. The first thing is that my manuscript should be the number one priority. Get that fixed and then I can send them to agents. If I like my manuscript, chances are it could be picked up. But I want to make sure that the book is everything. This is a great attitude to have and will serve you well. Keep in mind, though, that it might not be your first manuscript that lands you an agent and/or a publishing deal. It might not be your second. Or your fifth. Or your tenth. Agent Hannah Bowman constantly says on twitter that the best response to rejection is to write a better book. So keep writing, keep improving, and keep submitting.

Becca C.
01-26-2016, 02:30 AM
When it comes to researching publishers, a good tip we give here is to go to your favourite bookshop (a big chain one would probably be better for this, but a small indie would work too) and have a look around. Find books that are like yours and see who publishes them. The fact that those books are in the store is a good sign: it means the publisher has the means to distribute them widely. You want that. Read the authors' acknowledgements in the back of the book and see who their agent is, because they almost always thank them. Write those publishers and agents down and use them as a starting point to researching and building your submission list.

It's a fun field trip. Who doesn't want an excuse to troll the bookstore?!

Your attitude is great. The awareness of how long this process could take will serve you well. You're right, a book deal could be hundreds of rejections away. I've probably gotten over a hundred rejections in total. Only the first ten or so real hurt, after that the pain is manageable ;)

And yes: keep writing. Book after book after book. You can only improve if you practice, and you will improve if you do practice.

Good luck! We're here to support you!

WriterFantasyNights
01-26-2016, 02:54 AM
A lot of your questions are going to require you to do a lot of research (here and elsewhere on the internet) and do some soul-searching about what your career goals as a writer are.


When it comes to researching publishers, a good tip we give here is to go to your favourite bookshop (a big chain one would probably be better for this, but a small indie would work too) and have a look around. Find books that are like yours and see who publishes them. The fact that those books are in the store is a good sign: it means the publisher has the means to distribute them widely. You want that. Read the authors' acknowledgements in the back of the book and see who their agent is, because they almost always thank them. Write those publishers and agents down and use them as a starting point to researching and building your submission list.

It's a fun field trip. Who doesn't want an excuse to troll the bookstore?!

Your attitude is great. The awareness of how long this process could take will serve you well. You're right, a book deal could be hundreds of rejections away. I've probably gotten over a hundred rejections in total. Only the first ten or so real hurt, after that the pain is manageable ;)

And yes: keep writing. Book after book after book. You can only improve if you practice, and you will improve if you do practice.

Good luck! We're here to support you!

On that I can research and there is no problem. But I had read a lot of writing magazines where I had encountered such stories and that is why I asked them.

Thank you, and I'm not expecting to have it in an instant. I've read stories where there are hundreds of rejections. So I better be prepared for that rather than wait. And once I've sent it to one publisher, if I don't receive, then send to a next one. Its best if you know what you can deal with it. Those are some very good tips by the way which I'll def use for sure.

I have to work hard, and then it will come. All I must do is do hard work.

I love the word practice, because its true what they say. Most of the people that became famous had to go through this. I'll also go through this as well but I'll get there.

Also, many congratulations on your upcoming release. Its sounds a very intriguing novel :)

The fact you got over loads of rejections and are still getting published, well done. It takes a lot of nerve to pass through that.

Hmmm....that sounds like writing two or three novels all over again. I'll have a lot of books ready when the time comes.

If I did try for big publishers, they'd be either Tor Houses, Macmillian, or Penguin. I would go for Historical fiction or fantasy, and both if it is possible. But shouldn't get too ahead of myself, I've got to start writing first!

Jamesaritchie
01-26-2016, 04:44 AM
There is no way in blazes to answer all those questions in any good way without writing fifty thousand words in reply. You need to do some serous research, not just ask in places where you're get ten word replies, or one short post. It can take months to learns all those answers, and many will depend on who you are, and what you want.