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Fern
04-20-2006, 09:48 PM
This is one of those things that sounds strange to my ear when reading it back.

Do you say one has. . .

consulted an attorney
or
consulted with an attorney

reph
04-20-2006, 10:02 PM
Excuse me, but: "This is one of those things that SOUND strange to my ear when reading THEM back."

"Consult an attorney" means asking an attorney for information or advice. "Consult with an attorney" connotes more conversation, more back-and-forth.

CaroGirl
04-20-2006, 10:07 PM
This is one of those things that sounds strange to my ear when reading it back.

Do you say one has. . .

consulted an attorney
or
consulted with an attorney
The first one's fine. I find the second one a little touchy-feely and *with* just seems unnecessary. The *with* is implied in the definition of the word.

According to Merriam-Webster's online for consult:

1 : to have regard to : CONSIDER (http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/consider)
2 a : to ask the advice or opinion of <consult a doctor> b : to refer to <consult a dictionary>
intransitive senses
1 : to consult an individual
2 : to deliberate together : CONFER (http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/confer)
3 : to serve as a consultant (http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/consultant)

Jamesaritchie
04-20-2006, 10:22 PM
This is one of those things that sounds strange to my ear when reading it back.

Do you say one has. . .

consulted an attorney
or
consulted with an attorney

Just "consulted." "Consulted" means you talked to or with an attorney. "With" is unnecessary.

I'm going to consult my attorney, or "I consulted my attorney, are both the best choices. If you don't need a word, eliminate it. In this case, "with" is redundant.

Fern
04-20-2006, 11:11 PM
Thanks for the critique on my question, Reph, along with the response.

Also appreciate your help, Carogirl & Jamesaritchie.

The way I had written it to begin with is sounding better to me now that you all have confirmed that is the way to go.