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awatkins
04-20-2006, 05:56 PM
Anybody have suggestions to keep deer from eating shrubbery? We've had no trouble whatsoever until a month or so ago when something ate our pretty shrubs right down to the ground. These are planted up against the front porch and while deer roam our property like they own it, they've never bothered anything until now.

My dad heard that mint repels deer and other animals, so he gave us a huge batch. I've planted it in two long boxes and it's doing great. I'm thinking of splitting it up into many separate deep pots and setting the pots among the shrubs. (Don't want to plant it in the ground, as mint will spread like crazy.) Have any of you heard that mint works as a repellent?

I'm open to any suggestions! As soon as the bushes start to get new leaves and shoots, something comes along and eats them (eats, shoots, and leaves...sounds vaguely familiar). Help!

Jamesaritchie
04-20-2006, 07:08 PM
Anybody have suggestions to keep deer from eating shrubbery? We've had no trouble whatsoever until a month or so ago when something ate our pretty shrubs right down to the ground. These are planted up against the front porch and while deer roam our property like they own it, they've never bothered anything until now.

My dad heard that mint repels deer and other animals, so he gave us a huge batch. I've planted it in two long boxes and it's doing great. I'm thinking of splitting it up into many separate deep pots and setting the pots among the shrubs. (Don't want to plant it in the ground, as mint will spread like crazy.) Have any of you heard that mint works as a repellent?

I'm open to any suggestions! As soon as the bushes start to get new leaves and shoots, something comes along and eats them (eats, shoots, and leaves...sounds vaguely familiar). Help!



I've found that mint does help, but I do plant it in teh ground. It does spread, but it's not hard to keep picked back, and I use so much mint that I can't get enough.

There used to be a commercial deer repellent on teh market, but darned if I can remember what it was, and I have no idea whether it's still around.

Medievalist
04-20-2006, 07:53 PM
I've found that mint does help, but I do plant it in teh ground. It does spread, but it's not hard to keep picked back, and I use so much mint that I can't get enough.

There used to be a commercial deer repellent on teh market, but darned if I can remember what it was, and I have no idea whether it's still around.

Dried blood, which you will need to reapply, is available for just such purposes; and it's good for the soil.

In some areas you can purchase a compound derived from urine for much the same purpose, but it's not good for plants or soil.

awatkins
04-20-2006, 10:38 PM
Thanks so much, Lisa and James! I'll definitely give the mint a try, then.

Lisa, do you know where the dried blood can be purchased? I'm guessing maybe a farmer's co-op.

Jamesaritchie
04-20-2006, 10:41 PM
Dried blood, which you will need to reapply, is available for just such purposes; and it's good for the soil.

In some areas you can purchase a compound derived from urine for much the same purpose, but it's not good for plants or soil.



Somewhere in the back of my mind is the thought that both wolf and dog urine will do the trick, but the memory is from many years ago.

I've also seen animated, talking scarecrows (work with a motion sensor) that work well, but they can be an eyesore.

Medievalist
04-21-2006, 12:43 AM
Thanks so much, Lisa and James! I'll definitely give the mint a try, then.

Lisa, do you know where the dried blood can be purchased? I'm guessing maybe a farmer's co-op.

Nurseries, feed store, farmer's co-op - - - it's pretty common. It kept the deer away from our corn.

awatkins
04-21-2006, 01:48 AM
Thanks much. :)

DaveKuzminski
04-21-2006, 03:37 AM
Um, divorce? ;)

September skies
04-21-2006, 04:12 AM
We have a camp nearby for school children - and when I visited, I noticed they had a couple of bars of soaps (some still in their wrappers) hanging from some of the trees in a garden section. I asked why and they said it keeps deer away from there. Apparently they don't like the scent of man. They claim it works.

Unique
04-21-2006, 04:21 AM
Irish Spring.

Oh, and they do make netting that you can set up around your property. It's wide enough so the deer would have to walk on it and apparently they don't like to. It's not tall - I don't know why they don't jump over it but they don't. Maybe because it's not tall. A friend of mine used it with very good results.

awatkins
04-21-2006, 04:36 AM
Oh, more good ideas! Thanks Unique and Esther! I'll run all these by my hubby and see what he thinks. I already know he's not too enthused about the dried blood. ;)

And watch it, Dave. I'll start saving up those ugly crickets. :ROFL:

Cathy C
04-21-2006, 05:02 AM
One of the baseball "feel-good" movies (can't remember which one) actually had a useful suggestion. Deer were eating the new grass the coach was planting before it could become a diamond. The suggestion actually WORKS (since I tried it when I lived in the mountains.) Fresh human hair will keep them away like a charm. I just stopped by the local beauty salon and picked up a bag, and darned if it didn't work! Just sprinkle it in a circle about four feet away from the leaf edges. Be generous, and the more different people's hair you can get, the better. Replenish it every few days, like when you water and they'll stay away.


:)

A. Hamilton
04-21-2006, 06:09 AM
my gf lives on five acres and there is a large family of deer occupying a section. but they never come near her garden. she has a dog, and there are a few feral cats on the property. she said urine is the main key..the dog pees around the perimeter and the deer stay away. or maybe they just don't wanna come near the dog. she has a friend who hangs old cd's around her garden, the shiny reflection scares them away as well. she does have mint, which she says they don't eat, but she said she didn't think it really deterred them.

awatkins
04-21-2006, 08:28 PM
You people are great! I knew if I asked here, I'd get all sorts of useful suggestions, and boy, did you all deliver!

Thanks for the tips, P.H.Delarran. I think the deer (and rabbits and everything else) are so used to our little 14-year-old doggie that they're probably all great friends. I don't think her urine would scare away anything. :D But the CD idea is one I'll definitely keep in mind.

Cathy! You're brilliant! There's a beauty shop just down the sidewalk from my husband's office and I know one of the stylists very well. I called hubby at school and told him to drop by and ask them to save hair clippings for us a few times a week. I'd heard of this before, but totally forgot about it!

Okay, once I implement these ideas, if the deer eat any of our shrubs or flowers, I give up. :ROFL:

September skies
04-22-2006, 12:15 AM
One of the baseball "feel-good" movies (can't remember which one) actually had a useful suggestion. Deer were eating the new grass the coach was planting before it could become a diamond. The suggestion actually WORKS (since I tried it when I lived in the mountains.) Fresh human hair will keep them away like a charm.
The Rookie - I LOVE that movie. I have seen it like 100 times! Can't get enough feel-good baseball movies.

alleycat
04-22-2006, 03:32 AM
The Rookie - I LOVE that movie. I have seen it like 100 times! Can't get enough feel-good baseball movies.
I agree. That's one of the best baseball movies ever. I don't remember the part about deer eating the grass, but it's been a while since I've seen the movie.

In Tennessee, it's gotten to where people put up electric fences around their vegetable gardens to keep the deer out.

Beside using one of the deer repellent suggestions (such as a commercial deer repellent), you might also tempt the deer to go somewhere else, such as the back side of your property. Deer love a salt lick like that put up for cattle. That would be available at your local Co-op or farm supply store. It's illegal to use it to lure deer in order to hunt them though.

ac

awatkins
04-22-2006, 04:02 AM
Thanks, ac! I was pricing salt blocks earlier today. :)

katiemac
04-22-2006, 05:27 AM
Uh, I know some individuals who went as far as to pee around the perimeter of their garden themselves. Probably not a tactic you'd like to go for, but...

alleycat
04-22-2006, 02:00 PM
Uh, I know some individuals who went as far as to pee around the perimeter of their garden themselves. Probably not a tactic you'd like to go for, but...
I guess she could invite a bunch of college students over for a keg party and then . . . oh, never mind. ;)

Another idea to intice the deer away. Deer love apples so if you happen to have some source of "throwaway" apples (a friend who works at a grocery store?), you could put them on the far side of your property.

ac

GHF65
04-22-2006, 06:26 PM
I have 30 acres in the middle of an area of over 1000 acres of preserved farmland. Since much of that area is restricted, the hunters can't make a dent in the population. Deer bed under my office window during the winter and graze with the horses during the summer. Wild mint grows everywhere. They don't eat it, but it doesn't deter them from eating everything else they come into contact with.

That said, I had no problem with deer eating my shrubs until they discovered them. Once that happened, nothing I did made any difference to the deer. Commercial repellents were useless. Peeing around the garden (yes, I did) was fine until the first rain. I don't have time to keep replacing the pee. I didn't try the coyote urine available at the sporting goods store, but I may yet give it a shot. It's supposed to work extremely well.

Of all the methods I tried, only deer netting did wonders. I covered my shrubs with it and surrounded the vegetable garden, with a fence of it. They can feel it but not see it, so it's a great deterrent . . . until the buds at the ends of the rhododendrons pushed their way through the netting. The deer just shaved 'em right off. At least the rest of the shrub was left unscathed.

Every time a visitor voices excitement over the herd of deer drifting across my hayfield at dusk I offer several as a gift. So far I've had no takers.

I'm going to consider planting more mint. I like the idea of putting it in containers. That way I can move it around and see if there's an ideal mint-to-shrub ratio without turning my flower beds into mint beds.

alleycat
04-22-2006, 06:37 PM
I'm going to consider planting more mint. I like the idea of putting it in containers. That way I can move it around and see if there's an ideal mint-to-shrub ratio without turning my flower beds into mint beds.
Funny, a neighbor gave me a bunch of mint plants one year (spearmint and peppermint); I thought it would be great around where the heat pump unit sits and drains since I didn't want anything that grew very high or got bushy there. I had NO idea how invasive mint could be, especially when it's getting watered every day. It took a weekend to pull it all out.

If your visitors don't want the deer, ask if they want squirrels. I'd be glad to send 'em mine. I even have a squirrel trap to catch the little buggers. I like having a FEW squirrels around . . . but not two dozen.

I wonder if one of those ceramic dogs put outside would scare deer away? I'm talking about the kind that look just like a dog from a few feet. My mother has a couple of the things (Christmas presents) and sometimes small kids will try to pet them since they look so lifelike. They're not too expense; it might be worth trying. I have no idea whether it would work or not.

ac

Jamesaritchie
04-22-2006, 09:25 PM
Funny, a neighbor gave me a bunch of mint plants one year (spearmint and peppermint); I thought it would be great around where the heat pump unit sits and drains since I didn't want anything that grew very high or got bushy there. I had NO idea how invasive mint could be, especially when it's getting watered every day. It took a weekend to pull it all out.

If your visitors don't want the deer, ask if they want squirrels. I'd be glad to send 'em mine. I even have a squirrel trap to catch the little buggers. I like having a FEW squirrels around . . . but not two dozen.

I wonder if one of those ceramic dogs put outside would scare deer away? I'm talking about the kind that look just like a dog from a few feet. My mother has a couple of the things (Christmas presents) and sometimes small kids will try to pet them since they look so lifelike. They're not too expense; it might be worth trying. I have no idea whether it would work or not.

ac



I make so much mint tea, and use mint for other things, that it doesn't spread too far or too fast with me. But I'd rather have mint than grass, so I'm an exception.

awatkins
04-22-2006, 11:45 PM
Our mint smells just like spearmint chewing gum. Very fragrant.

This is the first time the deer have ever bothered anything like our shrubs. I think I'm going to try a combo of several of the suggestions here just to keep them from getting to used to any one (hopefully) deterrent.

DaveKuzminski
04-23-2006, 03:42 AM
What you need is a guard frog to chase away those deer. The deer bends down to eat only to have what it thought was green shrubery jump and it will find another place to stay. ;)

GHF65
04-23-2006, 05:44 PM
If your visitors don't want the deer, ask if they want squirrels. I'd be glad to send 'em mine. I even have a squirrel trap to catch the little buggers. I like having a FEW squirrels around . . . but not two dozen.

I wonder if one of those ceramic dogs put outside would scare deer away? I'm talking about the kind that look just like a dog from a few feet. My mother has a couple of the things (Christmas presents) and sometimes small kids will try to pet them since they look so lifelike. They're not too expense; it might be worth trying. I have no idea whether it would work or not.

ac

Maybe we can go into business--open a Buy One, Get One Free place. Take my deer and I'll throw in your squirrel or two as a bonus. Maybe if they take two deer I'll add a groundhog. Cliff spends long summer evenings on his belly doing search-and-destroy missions in the fields with smoke bombs, and the groundhogs stand around laughing.

Speaking of squirrels, one of my cats has adopted one. Just what I needed: a half-a**ed barn cat who can't catch his own tail bringing his squirrelly friend home for a snack on the deck.

Dogs? You're kidding, right? I live in a rural area. We have coyotes, foxes, and dogs running rampant. The deer hear them go by without raising their beadie little eyes from my tree peonies. A ceramic dog might be a nice addition to the collection of stuff the kids who do the drive-by mailbox smashings are making.

As far as I can tell, the only thing that frightens a deer is an excavator. You might want to think about just having one come in and dig randomly around your property. The deer will think you're crazy and move next door, and you'll have a good start on a whole bunch of really cool koi ponds. Or fill them all with cement, call them patios, and you'll solve any snake problems at the same time. Multi-tasking!

alleycat
04-23-2006, 06:53 PM
Speaking of squirrels, one of my cats has adopted one. Just what I needed: a half-a**ed barn cat who can't catch his own tail bringing his squirrelly friend home for a snack on the deck.
:ROFL:

You know, that sounds like a good plot for a children's story. The Squirrel Who Came to Dinner?

I've had a few encounters with groundhogs myself. Not always to my advantage. They're tougher than they look.

I'll be glad to throw in a possom or two to go with the deer and squirrels. One comes and eats the birdseed I put out on my deck.

ac

Unique
04-23-2006, 08:10 PM
<snip>


Of all the methods I tried, only deer netting did wonders. I covered my shrubs with it and surrounded the vegetable garden, with a fence of it. They can feel it but not see it, so it's a great deterrent . . . until the buds at the ends of the rhododendrons pushed their way through the netting. The deer just shaved 'em right off. At least the rest of the shrub was left unscathed.

<snip>.

You know, if you did this right, you'd never have to trim hedges again...:idea:

GHF65
04-24-2006, 04:01 PM
Whoa! What an idea! Unique, you've missed your calling. Great landscapers are hard to come by.

alleycat
04-24-2006, 04:14 PM
Whoa! What an idea! Unique, you've missed your calling. Great landscapers are hard to come by.
I'd be glad to throw in a squirrel or two to help bury any nuts or acorns you
have laying about. Hey, more pals for your cat to play with!

ac

GHF65
04-25-2006, 01:06 AM
I'd be glad to throw in a squirrel or two to help bury any nuts or acorns you
have laying about. Hey, more pals for your cat to play with!

ac

Thanks, AC. You're a real sport. :ROFL:

I have a feeling there's a bunch of us who would wind up in the dirt if we let the squirrels bury any nuts they find lying about.

Meanwhile, back at the deer farm . . .

I made an accidental discovery this morning. I discovered that deer won't cross the road in front of a car blasting The Eurythmics out its open windows, especially if the driver is singing along. So one might extrapolate to conclude that an excavator doing "Sweet Dreams" at full volume ought to pretty much clear the whole neighborhood of a burgeoning deer population, don't you think? Might also clear it of prospective developers, which would be a bonus.

Deer are not above intimidation if you approach them with the proper mindset. I yelled at a buck and his four does a few years back (they were standing about eight feet from me, which seems to be their comfort zone boundary, and listening intently while I repaired the fence) that if they didn't stop short-cutting through my main pasture and breaking the fence boards, I would hire a hit squad to come and kill them on opening day of deer season. They never broke those boards again. We're talking daily repair to nada, overnight. I used a lot of hand gestures, finger-pointing, arm-waving and a very serious tone of voice (and quite a few four-letter words). Make note. This could be a breakthrough in deer depredation therapy.

You herd it here first. ;)

awatkins
04-25-2006, 03:09 AM
:roll:

DaveKuzminski
04-25-2006, 04:25 AM
That or they found out that there were ninja frog lessons going on near your place. ;)

alleycat
04-25-2006, 06:26 AM
TDeer are not above intimidation if you approach them with the proper mindset. I yelled at a buck and his four does a few years back (they were standing about eight feet from me, which seems to be their comfort zone boundary, and listening intently while I repaired the fence) that if they didn't stop short-cutting through my main pasture and breaking the fence boards, I would hire a hit squad to come and kill them on opening day of deer season. They never broke those boards again. We're talking daily repair to nada, overnight. I used a lot of hand gestures, finger-pointing, arm-waving and a very serious tone of voice (and quite a few four-letter words). Make note. This could be a breakthrough in deer depredation therapy.

You herd it here first. ;)
Another story idea! The Deer Whisperer.

alleycat
04-25-2006, 01:22 PM
Hey, I just noticed the Google ads at the top of the page (when I wasn't logged in); they're all about deer repellants and squirrel traps and deer fences. I didn't know Google got that specific that they actually placed animals related ads above the Writing About Nature/Animals forum. I never noticed before since I rarely read those ads ("Make Big Money Writing From Home!")

ac

GHF65
04-25-2006, 04:31 PM
It's all about key words. Keep your eye on the ads. There should be some "Squirrel Training at Home" stuff coming up too, and lord knows where the "nuts" comment will lead.

Alien Enigma
05-05-2006, 11:44 AM
People in the South, use fragrances or bags to scare them away. You could put up fabric softener sheets, NEW tampons (but that would be embarrasing, I wouldn't do that), scented nasal tissues (possibly?), and things like that.

I know that some people put plastic bags around the problem areas, and tie them to a fence or clothesline. They swore it worked.


Jeff

www.freewebs.com/jefferysmiller

GHF65
05-05-2006, 04:43 PM
I had a close encounter of the deer kind the other night. Heard the crash, but didn't check out the damage till morning. Horses tend to crash around a lot, so I really wasn't curious.

When the sun came up I looked out the window and was startled to discover that my round pen, 60-feet wide, made of five-foot-high panels of steel tubing, was heart-shaped. Since it protrudes into the hay field, there was a trail through the tall grass, and there was significant damage to two of the panels, I'm guessing a buck in rut was running full-tilt in the fog in pursuit of a little fun and hit the pen. Bet he was startled!

alleycat
05-05-2006, 05:18 PM
I'm guessing a buck in rut was running full-tilt in the fog in pursuit of a little fun and hit the pen. Bet he was startled!
Sounds like my first date. . . :e2bummed:

awatkins
05-05-2006, 06:47 PM
Joanne, you do have the most interesting experiences with all the animals (domesticated and other) in your neck of the woods. :ROFL:

Thanks for the tips, Jeff. :)

Alien Enigma
05-06-2006, 12:25 PM
I forgot to mention something that goes with the plastic bags. You're supposed to put soap in the bags. You don't have to put a whole bar. You can carve a little bit of soap out and place it in the bag. I know that Irish Spring works well. It's really strong.


Jeff


www.freewebs.com/jefferysmiller

GHF65
05-06-2006, 05:21 PM
Sounds like my first date. . . :e2bummed:

*snicker* And all these years I thought he was faithful to me!


Joanne, you do have the most interesting experiences with all the animals (domesticated and other) in your neck of the woods. :ROFL:

Ya think? I haven't even begun to tell you about twenty-five years of teaching high school! I could start with the kid who came to school with a boa constrictor wrapped around his waist under his shirt. That suits the animal topic on two fronts (and a middle)! :D

awatkins
05-07-2006, 12:54 AM
Ya think? I haven't even begun to tell you about twenty-five years of teaching high school! I could start with the kid who came to school with a boa constrictor wrapped around his waist under his shirt. That suits the animal topic on two fronts (and a middle)! :D

What???? :eek: A boa constrictor??

When you write that book (the one you HAVE to write that has ALL this stuff in it), I'll be first in line with a handful of cash to buy my signed copy. lol

mischa
05-07-2006, 06:31 AM
There's a spray-on product called Liquid Fence that should work well for the deer. You may have to reapply it after rain; read the instructions on the bottle. My mom has used it with good success.

I, too, have a squirrel problem. They're actually not so bad this time of year, but once my garden starts getting some tomatoes in it, they take them away, even green. Kinda funny seeing a squirrel climb up a tree with a big green tennis-ball-looking-thingy in its jaws, but it also ticks me off because they don't share with me. They'll strip a plant and keep it that way all summer.
The worst is when there's a tomato just on the verge of being ready to pick, almost the peak of perfection;I can just taste the warm tanginess of it..... and then it will just be gone! Heartbreaking, I tell you...

Mischa

GHF65
05-07-2006, 04:26 PM
What???? :eek: A boa constrictor??

When you write that book (the one you HAVE to write that has ALL this stuff in it), I'll be first in line with a handful of cash to buy my signed copy. lol

I don't know about the book part, but the constrictor was for real. So was the ball python another kid brought in a big sack. He just wanted me to see it. I thanked him very much. Fortunately neither snake visited the day the really odd girl brought her prize hamster. :snoopy:

I'm in mourning this morning for my daughter's white bantam silky. Fox got the chickens last night. Fluffbudget was hand raised in the house, so his reaction to disturbances was always to sit quietly in the corner. Guess that made him easy pickin's for those damn critters.

This is not Fluffbudget's most flattering photo--Jess had just plucked him from his nappy spot in the mud of my flower bed--but it'll do. Rest his little chicken soul!

http://absolutewrite.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=&stc=1

awatkins
05-08-2006, 07:28 PM
Joanne: Oh, no! I'm so sorry about Fluffbudget. That's too bad. :(
Funny comment about the hamster, though. lol

Mischa: Do you know if Liquid Fence works for rabbits, too? Seems we have a problem with those guys, too. Sorry the squirrels keep stealing your tomatoes! I have enough trouble just getting tomatoes to grow this year, what with the all the recent rain drowning everything and hail shredding my flowers and fig tree leaves!

mischa
05-09-2006, 12:37 AM
Anne,

You could always try the Liquid Fence for the rabbits. If you're not sure if it will work, spray the stuff on half of what they usually eat, and see what happens. If they stay away from the sprayed plants, and still nibble the other ones, then it should work. You also need to read the label regarding its use on food plants; I'm not sure if it can be used on those or not.

Mischa

alleycat
05-09-2006, 01:16 AM
One of the things we used to use for rabbits was ammonium hydroxide. It's the same stuff that was used to make blueprints so I had gallons of the stuff for free. As I recall, it's also good for the soil. It worked. I believe it's used commercially. If you're interested, I could do a little more research.

They also make these garlic clip thingys for rabbit. Apparently rabbits are not Italian and so hate garlic (I'm not sure how they feel about pepperoni). I never used it but they're suppose to work.

When I lived at home, mom had a very effective rabbit repellant for her one-acre garden. Me with a shotgun.

ac

Fern
05-09-2006, 01:53 AM
Beagles work pretty good for the rabbit problem or the deer problem. Of course, it creates a problem of a different kind with all that OOOooooooooo....... stuff going on and on.

awatkins
05-12-2006, 10:54 PM
Mischa, thanks for the suggestion! I've seen that stuff and might give it a try.

And alleycat, I've seen those garlic clips advertised. Wonder if they work? Or would they just add a pleasant seasoning to my shrubs? lol

Fern, my dad's beagles *sing* for us all the time (his word for it--he says, "ah, listen to that music!"). They come in loud and clear from his house through the woods. :ROFL:

ETA: re: ammonium hydroxide. ac, I would be interested in learning more about this. Thanks. :)

alleycat
05-13-2006, 01:34 AM
Your wish is my command (as a cat, I'm trying to disarm the bird-loving moderator until I can get my paws on that feathered . . . uh, oh, never mind).

I find this link for AH: http://web1.msue.msu.edu/msue/iac/greentip/gt1124.pdf (http://web1.msue.msu.edu/msue/iac/greentip/gt1124.pdf)

While I was looking that up I happened to see a link to Liquid Fence. Apparently their deer repellent is suppose to work for rabbits too. Here's the link:
http://www.liquidfence.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWCATS&Category=200 (http://www.liquidfence.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWCATS&Category=200)

I'm a little suspicous of those garlic things myself. It would be my luck that the rabbits developed a taste for the stuff and started looking forward to me putting it out.

ac

Unique
05-14-2006, 07:37 PM
I'm a little suspicous of those garlic things myself. It would be my luck that the rabbits developed a taste for the stuff and started looking forward to me putting it out.

ac

:roll:

::::rabbit to alleycat::::

"'Garcon! More rosebush ratatouille, sil vous plait'"

awatkins
05-17-2006, 09:22 PM
Your wish is my command (as a cat, I'm trying to disarm the bird-loving moderator until I can get my paws on that feathered . . . uh, oh, never mind).

Ah, but don't be fooled by the mild-mannered appearance of the little feathered creature sitting in the nest. That's all I'm sayin'. ;)


I find this link for AH: http://web1.msue.msu.edu/msue/iac/greentip/gt1124.pdf (http://web1.msue.msu.edu/msue/iac/greentip/gt1124.pdf)

While I was looking that up I happened to see a link to Liquid Fence. Apparently their deer repellent is suppose to work for rabbits too. Here's the link:
http://www.liquidfence.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWCATS&Category=200 (http://www.liquidfence.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWCATS&Category=200)

Thanks!


I'm a little suspicous of those garlic things myself. It would be my luck that the rabbits developed a taste for the stuff and started looking forward to me putting it out.

ac

Yeah, me, too. Wonder if it would work for raccoons, though? They've taken to climbing the bird feeder post and stealing entire seed bells and suet cakes!!! Arrgghhhh......

alleycat
05-17-2006, 09:34 PM
I don't think anything works for raccoons. They're too clever and they've got those little hand-like paws that allows them to do anything.

ac

GHF65
05-18-2006, 01:06 AM
For what it's worth, a friend of mine plants garlic around her vegetable garden and hasn't had any losses in several years. I put some in right next to the rhodie the deer have been snacking on (right through the netting $#*&^*@!!), and the garlic is unscathed while the rhodie looks like it had a rough weekend.

Plant garlic in the fall for harvest in August. Just thought I'd throw that in.

alleycat
05-18-2006, 09:34 PM
Oh, great. After mentioning that I'd ended a few rabbit's existence in my day . . . the next fiction book I start is Brainwave by Poul Anderson. The very first scene is about a poor little rabbit trapped in a rabbit box . . . he exhausts himself trying to get free . . . his little heart is fluttering. . . at night he see the shadows of owls . . . he is scared to death. . . the moon reflects in his large, frightened eyes . . .

Now I feel like the guy who killed Bambi's mother. Uh, oh. I may have done that too.

ac