PDA

View Full Version : I Carved a Devil in the Belfry



William Haskins
01-08-2016, 05:57 AM
Will you peel back
a corner of the
midnight sky
to reveal what
lies behind this
farce of a universe,
random yet so precise,
this clockwork chaos
that blinks my eyes
and beats my heart,
even as I fall apart?

Perhaps an escape
from this cruelest of cells,
the one whose walls you cannot see,
only feel as they're closing in.

CassandraW
01-08-2016, 06:28 PM
I have told you this before -- I love your titles. They add, always, a dimension to your poems.

My first glance at the "belfry" in the title brought "bell tower" to mind (particularly one in a church, because of the carved devil). But the first read of the poem brought me to the secondary, slang meaning for belfry -- head, as in bats in the belfry.

In this case, it's not bats but internal turmoil in the narrator's belfry -- the cell with invisible walls closing in, the devil he has carved there. He seeks an answer, or at least an understanding, of the darkness and turmoil (a "peel[ing] back of a corner of the midnight sky to reveal what lies behind...") and an escape from the prison of darkness in his mind ("the cruelest of cells"). And meanwhile, the universe keeps ticking senselessly and remorselessly on -- "random and yet so precise" -- and so does he, his eyes blinking and heart beating like clockwork, despite the internal turmoil.

I have an image of an isolated tower in the dark night, with a tormented soul inside.

I have been in that place. No one captures this sort of thing better and more poignantly than you do, William.

William Haskins
01-08-2016, 11:58 PM
thank you for reading and commenting, cassandra.

Stew21
01-09-2016, 12:28 AM
Oh, I like this very much.

cray
01-09-2016, 01:50 AM
Oh, I like this very much.

it's hard not to.

once again, thank you william.




off topic, i think i remember you mentioning a few months ago the possibility of releasing another collection.
is that still a possibility?

William Haskins
01-09-2016, 02:16 AM
i very much hope so.

cray
01-09-2016, 02:45 AM
me too.

*checks watch*

William Haskins
01-09-2016, 02:47 AM
no doubt time is running out.

CassandraW
01-09-2016, 03:04 AM
time continues; cray's battery expired in 1938.

many of us are impatient for your book, though.

Magdalen
01-09-2016, 03:38 AM
This one's quite tactile and raised a few neck-hairs, then I laughed at the title & the image conjured of a naughty boy (which made the context even more perplexing/strangely exciting) - subsequent reads further appreciated the eerie, plaintive tone. Strange pleasure as well!

Perks
01-09-2016, 04:18 AM
time continues; cray's battery expired in 1938.

many of us are impatient for your book, though.

Do you have Sixty Six? I would say that it has my favorites in it, but Mr. Haskins has been working up new favorites with a wonderful regularity.

As for this one, it just works, as they nearly always do for me.

This, in particular -


this clockwork chaos
that blinks my eyes
and beats my heart,
even as I fall apart?

This is the part that pulls on me the most. I'm a broken record, but what I love the most is poetry that says what I've thought without ever arranging it properly in my head.

CassandraW
01-09-2016, 04:25 AM
Well, of course I have Sixty Six. My shrine would be incomplete without it.

Perks
01-09-2016, 04:30 AM
Well, of course I have Sixty Six. My shrine would be incomplete without it.Lol! I do have to admit that it was probably a silly question.

CassandraW
01-09-2016, 04:38 AM
My main trouble is that I'm nearly out of skin space upon which to tattoo his poems. I shall either have to flay myself and tattoo the other side, or else embroider them on my clothing.

Perks
01-09-2016, 04:48 AM
My main trouble is that I'm nearly out of skin space upon which to tattoo his poems. I shall either have to flay myself and tattoo the other side...

That is fucking vivid. Wow. I'm going to have a weird dream for sure.