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View Full Version : Did anyone else see the 'Sherlock Holmes' special? Did you like it? (POSSIBLE SPOILERS, OF COURSE)



frimble3
01-03-2016, 04:13 AM
As you may suspect from the wording, I wasn't all that crazy about it. I won't say anything specific, in case people haven't seen it, but were planning to. In general, lots of hype, not what I was hoping for.

angeliz2k
01-03-2016, 06:24 AM
I enjoyed it. I didn't have many expectations going in--though I figured it would be a one-off, in that it didn't directly impact the main storyline. I was right about that, and I was fine with that. Some of it didn't work 100% for me, but I've realized since the beginning of season 3 that I wasn't entirely on-board with the direction they were going. That being said, I enjoyed the Victorian setting, loved Cumberbatch and Freeman together, and thought it got into some deep character territory there for a little while.

LittlePinto
01-03-2016, 07:36 AM
There were parts of it that had the old magic, but I felt like Cumberbatch and Freeman were going through the motions at times. I also think Moffat and Gattis have become too self-aware of the writing and the story suffered for it.

Filigree
01-03-2016, 08:47 AM
As soon as I figured out the actual gimmick and what was really happening, I settled in and enjoyed it.

WriterDude
01-03-2016, 11:31 AM
I enjoyed it but it wasn't without its problems.

The opening scene on the Victorian Baker Street had unrealistic heavy horse drawn traffic on the central carriageway and pedestrians on the pavement. Victorian streets were more a shared space, with pedestrians and horses and the like finding their own path through the chaos. The BBC archives are full of examples.
Yes. I am that anal.

The bit with the gong, sorry, saw a gong and couldn't resist, can never resist a gong. Think Matt Smith had that line too somewhere.

Guerrien
01-03-2016, 05:09 PM
WILL BE SOME SPOILERS:









I enjoyed it well enough. It didn't delight me the way some of the episodes have in the main series, and I did grow quickly bored of the feminism subplot. Not because boo feminism or whatever, but because it just seemed very heavy-handed, from Mycroft referencing the war [they] must lose, to a cult of women killing their husbands, to the accusations of mansplaining that have been directed at that scene. I've seen the comments on Buzzfeed and elsewhere pointing out that it was all in Sherlock's mind palace, so of course he was the one to explain feminism in that situation--who else could have? But, to me, you know. The writer creates the situation that they put their character in. To then use that in defense of them to suggest that they were backed, inescapably, and unalterably, into a corner, to me misses the point.

But it was all kind of...okay. Didn't hate it, didn't love it, either.

LittlePinto
01-03-2016, 07:34 PM
I enjoyed it but it wasn't without its problems.

The opening scene on the Victorian Baker Street had unrealistic heavy horse drawn traffic on the central carriageway and pedestrians on the pavement. Victorian streets were more a shared space, with pedestrians and horses and the like finding their own path through the chaos. The BBC archives are full of examples.
Yes. I am that anal.

The bit with the gong, sorry, saw a gong and couldn't resist, can never resist a gong. Think Matt Smith had that line too somewhere.


I'm going to guess they segregated the horses and people primarily to keep the extras safe. People now aren't nearly as familiar with living around horses as they used to be, and even when they were it was hazardous. It's kind of like how none of the horses in The Walking Dead ever behaved like real horses when surrounded by zombies. (That just drove me crazy with TWD.)

As for the gong line I can't remember if Matt Smith ever had one like it or not, but, I agree, it was a very Matt Smith line. It distracted me for a moment as well.

mirandashell
01-03-2016, 09:35 PM
I was pretty meh about it as well. The first half-hour was amusing but the 'ghost' was way too easy to work out. And the whole subplot was so heavyhanded that I got a headache from rolling my eyes. Moffat and Gatiss cannot write decent female roles to save their lives. And they are also in danger of disappearing up their own cleverness.

It was alright but they really aren't as clever as they think they are.

DavidZahir
01-05-2016, 01:20 AM
I had a perfectly lovely time watching it with a friend who is also a big Sherlock fan.

MaryMumsy
01-05-2016, 03:46 AM
I enjoyed it. I haven't watched the series since the ep where John and Mary got married. I tried six times to watch that, and just couldn't get through it.

MM

Calla Lily
01-05-2016, 03:56 AM
We were disappointed overall because of expectations. Everything we saw (not a lot) led us to believe it was going to be 100% old-school SH in the actual time Doyle wrote them.

Saw through the gimmicks right away. No subtlety in them. We did like the banter; esp. Mrs. Hudson's.

ULTRAGOTHA
01-05-2016, 04:07 AM
The banter in the beginning was good. It lost my attention just after the middle. The end was a messy mess.

Last season seriously disappointed me and this didn't make me look forward to the next season.

MaeZe
01-09-2017, 08:05 AM
I have a question for anyone who has read the books, is there a bunch of personal drama in the books? That's what is ruining the latest version for me. It feels like gratuitous personal drama.

Brightdreamer
01-09-2017, 08:19 AM
I have a question for anyone who has read the books, is there a bunch of personal drama in the books? That's what is ruining the latest version for me. It feels like gratuitous personal drama.

I've read the four books and many of the Doyle short stories, and IIRC, they were much more about the cases and about Watson being awed by Holmes. (That's one of the reasons I enjoyed Freeman's performance in The Abominable Bride - he switched perfectly and effortlessly between the Victorian-era "puppy at the heels" Watson from the books/older series and the more modern incarnation of the character, who isn't afraid to talk back and stand up to Sherlock when he's being a jerk. Cumberbatch was mostly the same Sherlock throughout, but Freeman definitely switched personas.) Personal drama and "creating tension" wasn't as much of a Thing when he was writing, and IMHO they're overdoing that in... well, an awful lot of drama these days.

The Doyle works are public domain - worth a read, if you haven't already, though they aren't without flaws. (They did a brilliant wink to that in the pilot for the BBC series, with the "psychosomatic" limp after Watson was shot in the shoulder; Doyle messed up his own canon by moving Watson's war wound about, among other issues. And cases like "The Speckled Band" could not happen in reality.)