PDA

View Full Version : Movies and Books



Noizchild
01-03-2016, 03:03 AM
What movies made you want to read their books?


My picks are Clockwork Orange, Sphere, Perfume: Story of a Murderer, and Battle Royale manga and novel.

albrock
01-03-2016, 05:54 AM
The Martian movie put the book at the top of my TBR list. I started reading Austen's novels when a family friend took me to see Sense and Sensibility in 1995. Funny to think, I've been introduced to a lot of great books that way--The Princess Bride, The Neverending Story, Orlando, Marie Antoinette: The Journey.

Still waiting on the Good Omens ​movie, though.

lenore_x
01-03-2016, 09:35 AM
Miyazaki's adaptation of Howl's Moving Castle got me to pick up the book, and it became one of my all-time favorites. I still love the movie, too, even though they're quite different.

andiwrite
01-04-2016, 05:51 AM
White Oleander. The Beach. The Mazerunner series.

Brightdreamer
01-04-2016, 06:58 AM
I read Neil Gaiman's Coraline because I enjoyed the movie. They're a little different, but both excellent. (Speaking of Gaiman, I read Neverwhere after seeing the 6-part BBC miniseries. Enjoyed them both.)

I also read Ted Hughes's The Iron Giant and Cressida Cowell's How to Train Your Dragon because of the movies. I preferred the movies... I may not have bothered seeing them if I'd read the books first, TBH.

Having grown up enjoying The Flight of Dragons, I managed to track down both Peter Dickinson's The Flight of Dragons and Gordon R. Dickson's The Dragon and the George, which contributed to the story. TFoD was interesting, and I liked some of the ideas in TDatG.

I read Witi Ihimaera's Whale Rider after being impressed with the film. It tells a somewhat different story, but it's still good.

And I recently read A Christmas Story, the collected essays by humorist Jean Shepherd that went into the movie (which was also written by JS.) I think the movie worked a little better, frankly - he established a Time and Place, and had some amusing moments, but IMHO he was a little too in love with his own voice. The essay on the Bumpuses in particular went on way too long, to too little payoff.

I keep thinking there are others, but they're eluding me at the moment.

Noizchild
01-05-2016, 12:03 AM
I read Neil Gaiman's Coraline because I enjoyed the movie. They're a little different, but both excellent. (Speaking of Gaiman, I read Neverwhere after seeing the 6-part BBC miniseries. Enjoyed them both.)

I also read Ted Hughes's The Iron Giant and Cressida Cowell's How to Train Your Dragon because of the movies. I preferred the movies... I may not have bothered seeing them if I'd read the books first, TBH.

Having grown up enjoying The Flight of Dragons, I managed to track down both Peter Dickinson's The Flight of Dragons and Gordon R. Dickson's The Dragon and the George, which contributed to the story. TFoD was interesting, and I liked some of the ideas in TDatG.

I read Witi Ihimaera's Whale Rider after being impressed with the film. It tells a somewhat different story, but it's still good.

And I recently read A Christmas Story, the collected essays by humorist Jean Shepherd that went into the movie (which was also written by JS.) I think the movie worked a little better, frankly - he established a Time and Place, and had some amusing moments, but IMHO he was a little too in love with his own voice. The essay on the Bumpuses in particular went on way too long, to too little payoff.

I keep thinking there are others, but they're eluding me at the moment.

To me, the book to Coraline​ was better.

Jamesaritchie
01-05-2016, 03:13 AM
Every movie I like makes me check to see if there's an associated novel, either before or after the movie. Sometimes the novel comes before the book, and sometimes the novel is written only after the movie is a hit. Either way is fine with me. But if I like the movie, I always read the book.

blacbird
01-05-2016, 07:30 AM
My most obvious example, now ancient history, is To Kill a Mockingbird, with the wonderful result that both the movie and the book were excellent.

The dumbest example I can think of happened about 15 years ago or so: Some movie-making imbecile decided to make a movie of Charles Dickens' Great Expectations, under that title, but set the story in the contemporary U.S. I never saw it, but read critics who savaged the production mercilessly. Not long after it was out, I happened across a bookshop in an airport, in which was a "novelization" of the movie, under the title "Great Expectations". I hope the ghostwriter got paid.

caw

tiakall
01-05-2016, 05:42 PM
Stardust (good) and How to Train Your Dragon (mistake).

JimmyB27
01-05-2016, 05:45 PM
Every movie I like makes me check to see if there's an associated novel, either before or after the movie. Sometimes the novel comes before the book, and sometimes the novel is written only after the movie is a hit. Either way is fine with me. But if I like the movie, I always read the book.
I always read the book, if it came first. I've read several film novelisations and they've never been anything better than mediocre.

WriterBN
01-05-2016, 08:35 PM
Stardust (good) and How to Train Your Dragon (mistake).

How to Train Your Dragon was one of the very few instances I can remember where the movie was much better than the book.

Laer Carroll
01-09-2016, 09:19 AM
Not a single movie in many decades of life ever made me curious about the book. I appreciate the two art forms, but am not interested in how the stories cross over. I HAVE been curious about how the scripts for a movie have matched (or not) the finished product, but that's because I'm interested in screenwriting.

Jamesaritchie
01-09-2016, 10:18 PM
I always read the book, if it came first. I've read several film novelisations and they've never been anything better than mediocre.

What about Asimov's Fantastic Voyage? Other than Raquel Welch as eye candy, I thought the book was better than the movie.

mrsmig
01-09-2016, 10:26 PM
The movie "Master and Commander" got me hooked on the whole Aubrey/Maturin book series.