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rosehips
11-12-2015, 06:44 AM
I need a slang term for a foster home or being in the foster system, if anyone knows what that would have been called back in the early 60s. I've found some good guides online to more general slang, but not for that.

I'll no doubt need more specific stuff in the future, too, and I'll come back here to ask.

Thanks in advance for any help.

Siri Kirpal
11-13-2015, 06:53 AM
Sat Nam! (Literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

Neither my husband (who worked at Juvenal Hall for a brief but miserable period in the mid-'70s) nor I can dredge up any such terms...and although I hung out with the intelligentsia, I also attended some tough schools and chatted with people of all stations and races. So, we're not sure there was any slang for such people or that system.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

rosehips
11-14-2015, 06:13 AM
Thanks for trying to find something! I'll just use regular words, then.


Sat Nam! (Literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

Neither my husband (who worked at Juvenal Hall for a brief but miserable period in the mid-'70s) nor I can dredge up any such terms...and although I hung out with the intelligentsia, I also attended some tough schools and chatted with people of all stations and races. So, we're not sure there was any slang for such people or that system.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

rosehips
11-14-2015, 06:14 AM
I need a slang term for "wannabe"--apparently that term dates to the 80s, so it won't work. What would a person call someone who aspired to but failed to do something? Like a rock star wannabe? Or a wannabe homecoming queen?

Siri Kirpal
11-14-2015, 10:57 PM
Sat Nam! (Literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

I think we'd have said "hopeful" or "aspirant." A homecoming queen hopeful. A rock star aspirant. But both of those (especially aspirant) indicate the person had some hope of becoming what they wanted to be, whereas wannabe doesn't always. I'll ruminate on other possible terms.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

Siri Kirpal
11-15-2015, 03:37 AM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

My husband suggested "groupie," which was current then. That only works if your person hangs out with what they wannabe. Also, it can have sexual connotations.

I was an opera star wannabe in that time period. I'm guessing people said, "She's an opera nut. Who knows maybe we'll see her at the Met." So, "nut" is another possibility.

Hope some of this helps.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

frimble3
11-15-2015, 04:03 AM
Not quite the same, but in some contexts, how about 'Thinks they're a ...'? "Look at him and his pretend microphone! Thinks he's a rock star!"
"She bought that ballgown - does she think she's a prom queen?"

rwhegwood
11-16-2015, 08:03 AM
I remember the late fifties and the sixties, though not west coast.

Daddyo, neat, keen, keeno, neato, swell, jeepers, square (making the transition from a positive to a negative attribute), cool (making its appearance). Fink and Rat Fink (https://redtreetimes.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/kid-ratfink_logo_sm.jpg) (the anti mickey mouse), baby,

By the mid sixties you started to hear hip, groovy, rockin', square (negative), boss, keep on truckin', bad (for good), bod, bug (for annoy), funky, fuzz (for cops).

For wannabes I recall terms like posers (70s).

rosehips
11-17-2015, 06:10 AM
Thanks, everyone!

rosehips
11-17-2015, 06:13 AM
Does anyone know whether the terms "colored" and "Negro" were interchangeable? Was one considered preferable to the other among Civil Rights Activists?

Siri Kirpal
11-17-2015, 08:05 AM
Sat Nam! (Literally "Truth Name"-- a Sikh greeting)

"Black" was the word of choice in the mid-late '60s. "Colored" was old-fashioned, but used, especially by older Southerners who wished to be respectful. (My Missourah grandmother who was living in San Diego at the time being a case in point.) "Negro" was neutral, and perhaps more formal, and IIRC, the one preferred by Civil Rights activists, when they weren't using the word "Black."

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

WeaselFire
11-18-2015, 04:41 AM
Most 1950's white folk referred to blacks as "colored" to be polite, "Negro" as a definition and the infamous "N" word that will get me blackballed if I write it here. "Black" and "African-American" came into more general use in the early to mid-1960's, though West Coast in the major cities or anywhere in the Northeast tended to adopt terms earlier and deeper South kept their terminology until about 4:30 yesterday afternoon. :)

Jeff

Siri Kirpal
11-18-2015, 06:49 AM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

Yes, African-American was current in your time period also.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal, who graduated from San Diego High in 1970 with a class 20% Black, 40% Chicano (preferred term then), 40% white, with a smattering of mostly Chinese-American Asians

Siri Kirpal
11-18-2015, 07:35 AM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

Since Jeff mentioned the "N" word, I think I should tell you that that polite circumlocution to refer to a word one doesn't want to say was not current in that period. (The word itself unfortunately was.)

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

rosehips
11-26-2015, 06:43 AM
Thanks again, all! I was not aware that the term "black" was in use at the time. Very helpful.