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Gregg Bell
10-05-2015, 12:04 AM
It's in "The Week" magazine in the 10/09/15 edition.

"One of the ridiculous aspects of being a poet is the gulf between how seriously we take ourselves and how generally we are ignored by everybody else."

William Haskins
10-05-2015, 07:11 AM
what do you think about his quote, gregg?

frimble3
10-05-2015, 08:31 AM
Well, you could say the same about a lot of groups: poets, artists, model train hobbyists. I'll bet deep in their hearts, a lot of lawyers see themselves as Clarence Darrow, and every guy with a video camera dreams of getting world-changing footage.
People just naturally think what they are doing is important.

cellajam
10-05-2015, 08:40 AM
It's in "The Week" magazine in the 10/09/15 edition.

"One of the ridiculous aspects of being a poet is the gulf between how seriously we take ourselves and how generally we are ignored by everybody else."

I don't think it's ridiculous. To do something well you've got to take it seriously and whether or not the world cares isn't the judgement on any act.

William Haskins
10-05-2015, 07:51 PM
Well, you could say the same about a lot of groups: poets, artists, model train hobbyists.

at the risk over overinflating the importance of poetry, i would suggest that poetry (ideally) offers a bit more to humanity than do model trains.

Gregg Bell
10-06-2015, 12:41 AM
what do you think about his quote, gregg?

I think his comment is pretty flippant. A lot of poets do take themselves awfully seriously but that has probably contributed to their art too. John Steinbeck was talking about golf and the "silliness" of grown men taking themselves so seriously as the whacked a little white ball around on a big lawn. He then talked about a dung beetle and how it was hugely important to that dung beetle to push that little ball of dung around. I take it he's saying whatever you're doing, no matter how frivolous it may seem to others, is important and if you want to be effective at it you'd better think so yourself.

William Haskins
10-06-2015, 05:43 AM
collins is a cool guy and a gifted poet, and i took it as the self-effacing quip it is.

the truth underneath, however, is pretty distressing. and poets are complicit in it to a certain degree.

once popular support faded with the counter-culture, poets turned inward as a community, largely directing their discussion of the craft and, frankly, their publishing efforts to other poets.

there is value in this sort of closing of ranks to protect and preserve an art form, but there's a point where your just sitting at the bedside of a dying language.

i'm committed to writing poetry and trying to get people who don't read a lot of poetry. damn right i'm serious about that.

Perks
10-06-2015, 04:32 PM
Yes, you can get a feeling for Billy Collins by listening to him read his poem, Litany (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56Iq3PbSWZY). He's really very funny.

(Alternately, here's a three year old reciting it (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVu4Me_n91Y), giving an entirely new - and delightful - take on it.)

I think Billy Collins was probably joking and perhaps overstated how much poets are ignored in order to poke fun, in contrast, at what he thinks of as pretension.

Since poems have the tendency to make words and expressions stretch to the limits of their sounds and meanings to get their points across, they can be conceptually and linguistically challenging. Some readers (and readers who happen to also be poets) have more tolerance for this than others. Edges are mapped by a lot of falling over them. Don't ask me how I know this.


Signed,

Perks, who is often headlong into the abyss of the too-cryptic

kborsden
10-06-2015, 05:14 PM
i'm committed to writing poetry and trying to get people who don't read a lot of poetry. damn right i'm serious about that.

Where did you get my hymn sheet? Ok, go on, pass it round :)

I agree 100%. Poetry belongs to the masses, not the few behind a closed door. The poetry community has over the years skillfully crafted a wall around itself, and academia has sealed that wall with elitism, and then the avant garde crowd went and strung up barbed wire around the perimeter. My entire approach via formalism is counter that, and the poetry I write is littered with mundane, real world artifacts which I feel opens up what I'm writing... could be wrong though :S There's serious effort in that too, and my themes are serious because they come from me, and I'm serious about what I experience in life and how it affects me and my children, and I'm serious about sharing that--I'm serious about gifting my poetry and happily serious in receiving the gifts from other poets. I'm serious about that being something for all, not just me.

I don't feel anyone is holding on to something that's dying though. I enjoy pointing out the poetry in the everyday, the figures of speech and expressions people use, advertising slogans, rugby chants--eye grabbers in corporate memos :) Poetry lives and breathes around us in constant palpitation by many names and in many forms, and not only those who call themselves poets create it; people just don't see it. Having said that, I've met many individuals who have disgarded their view of poetry as something stuffy, and been able to idenitfy and see it. A little push is all it needs. Problems then arise when they want to write poetry themselves... Seriously? The fools!

Stew21
10-06-2015, 05:52 PM
I also think it was self-effacing humor. (Perks, I love his reading Litany; he is so funny).

But I do think there is a general presumption out there from poetry readers and non-readers alike that poets are pretentious and think a great deal of themselves and take themselves too seriously.

I happen to think poetry is serious, and important and shouldn't be taken lightly. And that maybe if we didn't take ourselves seriously, we would not push ourselves and language as far as we could/should.

I also agree with William and Kie that we should make a point to bring poetry to the folks who don't consider themselves Poetry readers.
If they read something I wrote, they can think I'm too serious if they want; I don't mind. If they're thinking something (even something negative) about me, it's better than not thinking about poetry and poets at all, and being "generally ignored". I can take it.

I regularly forego the "Facebook status" and post a poem I wrote instead. I share all of my soundcloud readings there too. I know they don't all read it, but some do, and some share it with others. And if at any point reading something I wrote makes them read something by someone else, then I did my "job". Yeah, I take that pretty seriously.

_city_
10-07-2015, 12:17 AM
I think there's a difference between the poet taking the work seriously and the poet taking the poet seriously.

cellajam
10-07-2015, 12:43 AM
I think there's a difference between the poet taking the work seriously and the poet taking the poet seriously.

Agreed.

William Haskins
10-07-2015, 01:47 AM
I think there's a difference between the poet taking the work seriously and the poet taking the poet seriously.

enlighten us with the distinction?

Perks
10-07-2015, 01:59 AM
I think there's a difference between the poet taking the work seriously and the poet taking the poet seriously.

I can't imagine having the courage to put a poem out for consumption if the poet didn't take himself seriously. Taking yourself seriously and lathering up with self-importance might be a worthy distinction.

William Haskins
10-08-2015, 10:35 PM
I think there's a difference between the poet taking the work seriously and the poet taking the poet seriously.


enlighten us with the distinction?

do we get to know what the distinction is? i'm hanging on by a thread here...

KTC
10-08-2015, 11:23 PM
The real golf that divides a poet clearly in half with a vast empty schism of bloodshed bubbling up in the middle is the space between HOW YOU SEE A THING TO BE and HOW YOU GET THE THING DOWN ON PAPER. The poetry, really, is in the vision. The words that fall to the paper in its attempts to capture that vision are crap in comparison. That's the gulf, by god...never attaining the glory of the vision. That's the ridiculous aspect, buddy.

KTC
10-08-2015, 11:26 PM
I think his comment is pretty flippant. A lot of poets do take themselves awfully seriously but that has probably contributed to their art too. John Steinbeck was talking about golf and the "silliness" of grown men taking themselves so seriously as the whacked a little white ball around on a big lawn. He then talked about a dung beetle and how it was hugely important to that dung beetle to push that little ball of dung around. I take it he's saying whatever you're doing, no matter how frivolous it may seem to others, is important and if you want to be effective at it you'd better think so yourself.

I never take myself seriously. And I am affronted by people who do. Poetry is a frivolity. It should be enjoyed like candy, not mulled over like a roast. The catching of the gist is no more serious than sneeze. Why should the sneezer be treated for the plague?

William Haskins
10-08-2015, 11:33 PM
The real golf that divides a poet clearly in half with a vast empty schism of bloodshed bubbling up in the middle is the space between HOW YOU SEE A THING TO BE and HOW YOU GET THE THING DOWN ON PAPER. The poetry, really, is in the vision. The words that fall to the paper in its attempts to capture that vision are crap in comparison. That's the gulf, by god...never attaining the glory of the vision. That's the ridiculous aspect, buddy.

Between the idea
And the reality
Between the motion
And the act
Falls the Shadow

For thine is the Kingdom

Between the conception
And the creation
Between the emotion
And the response
Falls the Shadow
Life is very long



Between the desire
And the spasm
Between the potency
And the existence
Between the essence
And the descent
Falls the Shadow
For Thine is the Kingdom



For Thine is
Life is
For Thine is the
This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but with a whimper.

https://www.msu.edu/~jungahre/transmedia/the-hollow-men.html

William Haskins
10-08-2015, 11:35 PM
Poetry is a frivolity. It should be enjoyed like candy, not mulled over like a roast.

could not disagree more with the former.

the latter can be true, in cases, but the contention that poetry is categorically nothing but empty calories is repulsive to me.

you're entitled to your opinion, but my opinion is that it is a shit opinion.

KTC
10-09-2015, 07:31 AM
could not disagree more with the former.

the latter can be true, in cases, but the contention that poetry is categorically nothing but empty calories is repulsive to me.

you're entitled to your opinion, but my opinion is that it is a shit opinion.


No doubt it is a shit opinion, but yes... It's mine. The moment a thing becomes serious to me it becomes dead. Frivolity is beauty. Without it, I die. I've never been told ever that my opinion was shit. I've been told it was wrong... But never shit.

kuwisdelu
10-09-2015, 07:41 AM
Well. There is a difference between seriousness and importance.

It's possible for things to be frivolous and meaningful.

Frivolity doesn't imply lack of depth or importance.

poetinahat
10-09-2015, 08:16 AM
To me, being serious about an activity means wanting to do it well, and to improve. No reason I can't smile as I do it. But I hope the desire to do my best isn't an affront to anyone!

kborsden
10-09-2015, 09:07 AM
It's possible for things to be frivolous and meaningful.

Frivolity doesn't imply lack of depth or importance.

Uhm... from the Oxford English Dictionary:

frivolous (ˈfrɪvələs)
adj
1. not serious or sensible in content, attitude, or behaviour; lacking depth and value; silly
2. unworthy of serious or sensible treatment; unimportant
[from Latin frīvolus silly, worthless]

kuwisdelu
10-09-2015, 09:22 AM
Uhm... from the Oxford English Dictionary:

frivolous (ˈfrɪvələs)
adj
1. not serious or sensible in content, attitude, or behaviour; lacking depth and value; silly
2. unworthy of serious or sensible treatment; unimportant
[from Latin frīvolus silly, worthless]

Dictionaries lie all the time. Don't believe them.

Why so serious?

kborsden
10-09-2015, 10:04 AM
Why so serious?

From Steven Knight's poem, 'chubby legs':

'infant days built on round-cornered, colourful blocks
of the most important frivolity'

I'm not being 'so serious'... not at all. I just don't think frivolity is the word to describe anything people hold dear or are passionate about, or at least not in the way it was intended in that post. Unlike Knight who uses it in a fantastic oxymoron that serves to highlight the importance for one person that lives inside the perceived unimportance of another, Kev's statement is a sweeping one which undermines the passion of every poet on this forum.

I'm not being overly serious in saying that, just straight.

--> perhaps also being a bit melodramatic in the flavor of my word choice

kuwisdelu
10-09-2015, 10:10 AM
Unlike Knight who uses it in a fantastic oxymoron that serves to highlight the importance for one person that lives inside the perceived unimportance of another, Kev's statement is a sweeping one which undermines the passion of every poet on this forum.

I don't know. Obviously he is the only one who can clarify, but if you'd die without something, then I figure that thing must be pretty damn important.

kborsden
10-09-2015, 10:27 AM
if you'd die without something, then I figure that thing must be pretty damn important.

Poetry is not air, nor water, nor food. But that doesn't make it frivolous. Poetry has helped me through some hard times. Reading and writing it. There are entire areas of culture built ontop of poetic concepts, massive chunks of every day language stemming from past poetry. Poetry has been important in the founding of many things in society from knowledge retention, to rebellion; retelling, education and preservation of history. I'd say that has a degree of importance in the wider sense, and no, it probably wouldn't kill us if it wasn't.

I don't know if I'd die without poetry -- that's an extreme point to bring into the conversation, and a pretty puerile direction too. To die without frivolity is equally rediculous and indeed puts it in a place of import. So, can frivolity be frivilous if it serves such great importance? It becomes a rather moot adjective then doesn't it?

"I'd die without frivolous things" is a melodramatic, somewhat excessive statement; a hyperbolic expression to strengthen an opinion (thus actually frivolous in itself as it holds no true value), whereas Knight's oxymoron alludes grandeur (for those who see it) in the things others take for granted. Describing poetry as a 'most important frivolity' is something I could live with because the truth is, most don't appreciate it as much as those who read and write it -- which brings us kind of full circle to the OP. Neat that!

poetinahat
10-09-2015, 01:14 PM
"One of the ridiculous aspects of being a poet is the gulf between how seriously we take ourselves and how generally we are ignored by everybody else."
You know, the same could be said about homeless people.

Kylabelle
10-09-2015, 03:43 PM
Kev's statement is a sweeping one which undermines the passion of every poet on this forum.


Nothing Kevin said undermines my passion or my poetry in the slightest. In fact, no one's opinion is capable of doing that.

I was going to stay out of this thread but I didn't want my silence to be taken as implicit agreement with that particular statement.

I think I get where Kevin is coming from, with the use of the word "frivolity" and I think I also get the objections to the notion of poets taking themselves "too seriously". "Serious" -- and I am as committed to poetry as is anyone in this forum -- carries a connotation of self-importance (as mentioned somewhere in thread) and even a flavor of pomposity. Whereas "frivolous" has a tone of playfulness and light and uplift.

Without a seasoning of frivolity -- of play, light, uplift, humor -- verbal art easily becomes deadly and, ultimately, irrelevant.

I would also hazard that everyone here knows that.

kborsden
10-09-2015, 04:10 PM
I think I get where Kevin is coming from, with the use of the word "frivolity" and I think I also get the objections to the notion of poets taking themselves "too seriously". "Serious" -- and I am as committed to poetry as is anyone in this forum -- carries a connotation of self-importance (as mentioned somewhere in thread) and even a flavor of pomposity. Whereas "frivolous" has a tone of playfulness and light and uplift.


The root of frivolity is frivolous:


frivolous (ˈfrɪvələs)
adj
1. not serious or sensible in content, attitude, or behaviour; lacking depth and value; silly
2. unworthy of serious or sensible treatment; unimportant
[from Latin frīvolus silly, worthless]



Without a seasoning of frivolity -- of play, light, uplift, humor -- verbal art easily becomes deadly and, ultimately, irrelevant.

If something is frivolous, it is by it's nature already irrelevant. But I get where you're coming from. There should be lightness where it's welcome, and there is a welcome space in everything. But I look at it this way: having or containing mundane artifacts doesn't make something mundane. Likewise, holding frivolous artifacts doesn't qualify the entire body of something as frivolous. Poetry is not a frivolous passtime because some poets like to use humor or have fun with words and imagery. Even when I write serious poetry, I enjoy the passtime--nonsense verse, I also enjoy. Neither are frivolous to me, though maybe to someone else. To simply state that none of it matters is (as William said) a shitty opinion. That's my shitty opinion anyway--they always have a very distinct aroma (post #27).

Kylabelle
10-09-2015, 05:39 PM
I'll amend my comment with this: clearly not all poetry has recognizably frivolous elements. However, I do believe that in order to write even the most serious, weighty, or even dark poems, the poet must exercise a capacity to play with language. That in itself -- and in isolation too, perhaps -- is a frivolous quality.

Fundamentally, I'm not able to rest with much that is absolute or exclusionist. I am serious about my frivolity and vice versa. The alchemy of polarities is something of a constant -- and no doubt even that has a mobius twist to it, somewhere.

KTC
10-09-2015, 05:51 PM
I take my frivolity dead seriously. I wouldn't die without poetry. I would die without frivolity.

When I said, "And I am affronted by people who do." I should have ended that sentence with "...take me seriously." I don't give a good goddamn how other poets or people take themselves. Just don't take me seriously. To me, everything is irrelevant. I once lived in a relative world. I didn't like it. My story is going to end the same way as everyone else. Death. Everything is relevant and nothing is relevant. A hundred years, all new people. I don't need agreement, because I don't take myself seriously (see above). Apparently my asinine opinions have the ability to twist knickers into knots. I'm also a magician.

KTC
10-09-2015, 05:54 PM
Furthermore...

And another thing...

And to add...

I'm doing.

Frivolous or not, I'm doing. I would no sooner intentionally write a bad poem then I would slap a puppy.

I always write for the Fat Lady. That alone implies the willful dead seriousness of my frivolity. No one will ever see my shoes, goddamn it...but it doesn't mean I won't polish them shiny every single chance I get. The Fat Lady sees them...just as she sees my poetry.

kborsden
10-09-2015, 06:01 PM
In the words of my grandfather: opinions are like arseholes. Everyone has one, and they all stink.

KTC
10-09-2015, 06:07 PM
As Laney in Reality Bites once said, "Um...yeah."

Jamesaritchie
10-09-2015, 06:18 PM
enlighten us with the distinction?

You seriously have to ask this question? If so, you aren't going to understand the answer.

William Haskins
10-09-2015, 06:36 PM
i was just thinking, "what this thread needs is more brilliance."

little did i know it would arrive in absolute form.

KTC
10-09-2015, 06:52 PM
I can't imagine having the courage to put a poem out for consumption if the poet didn't take himself seriously. Taking yourself seriously and lathering up with self-importance might be a worthy distinction.

But it does in fact work. I sell my poetry quite often. I don't need to take myself seriously to submit my work. I have submitted it without even reading what I wrote in the past. (I once won a $500 poetry prize and I had to read my entry to even realize what it was I submitted). I enjoy the act of poeting because it's not serious.

Again, the caveat here is that I'm speaking for myself alone. I don't want to impose my cake philosophy on a steak and potatoes crowd. I just want to state that that is my philosophy. As Cornel West once said--and possibly apropos of nothing--"There is a price to pay for speaking the truth. There is a bigger price for living a lie." I talk of my truth, because I lived my lie. Poetry is Play. The act of reading it and the act of writing it is pure unadulterated play. (FOR ME.)

Brandt
10-09-2015, 07:55 PM
wish I had a dime for every frivolous thing in my life, but poetry/writing wouldn't add a penny to the pile. I discovered it late, and often wonder why? what countless days and hours were filled with such default frivolity in the absence of marshalling thought and emotion, to at least make the effort, to connect meaningfully through words on paper. of course, every story and personality is unique, and in turn, so is every approach. Personally, I cannot accept the irrelevance of life, as troubling and even painful as it may be at times, for that would strip it of purpose. that, I would die without.

cellajam
10-10-2015, 08:57 PM
I think there's a difference between the poet taking the work seriously and the poet taking the poet seriously.

Returning to see where this thread has gone, I'd like to explain my agreement with this.

I don't take my existence too seriously, I don't think I will change the course of the human race. I live a small life that suits me. That doesn't stop me from trying to do the best I can at any undertaking. I take my creative pursuits seriously because they matter to me, and for me part of those pursuits is interacting with people who are likeminded and take them seriously too. Do I think it would matter if me and all my art disappeared tomorrow? Nope, I just can't take myself that seriously. ;)

William Haskins
10-10-2015, 09:06 PM
it's rather illuminating that there seems to be a concrete and righteous definition of what constitutes "me not taking myself/poetry seriously" centered on humility and an exaggerated and very loaded definition of "you taking yourself/poetry seriously" centered on inflated self-importance.

cellajam
10-10-2015, 09:45 PM
it's rather illuminating that there seems to be a concrete and righteous definition of what constitutes "me not taking myself/poetry seriously" centered on humility and an exaggerated and very loaded definition of "you taking yourself/poetry seriously" centered on inflated self-importance.

I don't think it's that wide a line between the two, or needs to be that judgmental. My only point was that there is a difference between taking oneself seriously and taking one's endeavors seriously. There's room in the world, and the poetry world, for everyone. I can give respect to the movers and shakers without being one. :)

William Haskins
10-10-2015, 09:51 PM
don't mind me.

Kylabelle
10-10-2015, 09:54 PM
I find myself wondering what else Billy Collins thinks is ridiculous about being a poet. I mean, human beings are ridiculous fundamentally, at least according to some, but why poets in particular?

cellajam
10-10-2015, 10:05 PM
don't mind me.
No problem. ;)

cellajam
10-10-2015, 10:06 PM
I find myself wondering what else Billy Collins thinks is ridiculous about being a poet. I mean, human beings are ridiculous fundamentally, at least according to some, but why poets in particular?
I don't wonder at all about what Billy Collins is thinking about. :roll:

Kylabelle
10-10-2015, 10:34 PM
Well, I wouldn't either except for this thread which quotes him. Anyone who says "one of the..." presumably has more of the... in mind.

William Haskins
10-10-2015, 10:49 PM
hopefully the admins will get their shit together soon and move the poetry forum out of "general writing interest" into "pop culture" with cooking and basket-weaving.

Kylabelle
10-10-2015, 11:12 PM
I've often thought it belongs as a subset of Politics and Current Events, myself.

kborsden
10-11-2015, 12:20 AM
it's rather illuminating that there seems to be a concrete and righteous definition of what constitutes "me not taking myself/poetry seriously" centered on humility and an exaggerated and very loaded definition of "you taking yourself/poetry seriously" centered on inflated self-importance.

You could almost say that the humble "me not taking myself/poetry seriously" thinks itself better than the the pompous "you taking yourself/poetry seriously"... it doesn't amaze me that poets distinguish between themselves in this way. In the same way that some believe receiving or seeking payment for poetry is practically blasphemous, or those that can't or simply refuse to take a poet seriously who writes purely for their own enjoyment.

William Haskins
10-11-2015, 12:52 AM
probably best to write off poets as a whole as a despicable class of sub-humans and figure out a disposal plan.

kborsden
10-11-2015, 01:15 AM
Agreed. As long as that disposal plan is seriously considered.

William Haskins
10-11-2015, 01:16 AM
finally. consensus.

poetinahat
10-11-2015, 04:21 AM
I've often thought it belongs as a subset of Politics and Current Events, myself.
Please. Kill me now.

William Haskins
10-11-2015, 04:22 AM
working on it.

poetinahat
10-11-2015, 04:26 AM
He cares!

William Haskins
10-11-2015, 04:28 AM
frivolously.

Kylabelle
10-11-2015, 05:15 AM
probably best to write off poets as a whole as a despicable class of sub-humans and figure out a disposal plan.

I like mine fried crispy, with ketchup.

poetinahat
10-11-2015, 05:26 AM
Hold the pickles, hold the lettuce

See what chasing the money gets you? Trochaic tetrameter.

Kylabelle
10-11-2015, 05:29 AM
Sounds painful. Is there a cure?

C.bronco
10-11-2015, 06:25 AM
You win a major poetry contest against dozens or hundreds of other accomplished poets for a first taste of recognition. You win 25 bucks. You write poetry for he love of an amazing art. We are in a renaissance of wonderful contemporary poetry. No one makes a living from it. Pulitzer prize winners have day jobs. Only Adrienne Rich has an agent. I think Billy Collins is on pointe.

poetinahat
10-11-2015, 06:38 AM
Given the prevalence of #amwriting memes and the like, it would seem that a lot of writers want the world to know how hard, or how special, it is to be a writer of any stripe. So there are more writers overall taking themselves seriously - or, maybe wanting to be taken seriously. Of course, while these expositions happen, they/we aren't actually writing.

Poets, perhaps, are just more open to derision, perhaps because of the relative perceived impracticality of what they do.

I dunno. I think the assertion is overly general, as are statements like, "If you don't feel a burning desire to write, then you shouldn't". Or, "A poet's job is to <whatever>". Nonsense. It takes all kinds.

C.bronco
10-11-2015, 06:49 AM
Thanks, Poet, for posting the entries in your signature. It is cool to see the folks among us who wrote some really great poems, and to learn who I voted for!

Kylabelle
10-11-2015, 03:02 PM
I still want to know what else is ridiculous. Just out of curiosity.

William Haskins
10-11-2015, 06:23 PM
email billy collins. he's a poet, not the pope.

Kylabelle
10-11-2015, 07:07 PM
You can't be serious.

William Haskins
10-11-2015, 07:08 PM
i would think if i have accomplished nothing else in this thread, i have made my seriousness in all matters abundantly clear.

Kylabelle
10-11-2015, 07:17 PM
Possibly so, but the thread is still here, so I poked it.

William Haskins
10-11-2015, 07:27 PM
this thread is a mound of rotting flesh and your efforts are better spent elsewhere.

kuwisdelu
10-11-2015, 07:59 PM
I still want to know what else is ridiculous. Just out of curiosity.

That bumblebee, for one.

Kylabelle
10-11-2015, 09:14 PM
this thread is a mound of rotting flesh and your efforts are better spent elsewhere.

You just want it all to yourself.


That bumblebee, for one.

Are you sure that's what it is? Better go see....

poetinahat
10-12-2015, 03:47 AM
Here's another ridiculous thing: having a critique forum for frivolous writing.

Kylabelle
10-12-2015, 04:04 AM
Only if you take it too seriously.

kuwisdelu
10-12-2015, 04:22 AM
Here's another ridiculous thing: having a critique forum for frivolous writing.

Now, now. We poets shouldn't put down [insert your favorite fiction genre here] just because they aren't real writers.

poetinahat
10-12-2015, 10:36 AM
If Billy Collins saw this thread, he'd think, "QED"

Perks
10-13-2015, 01:33 AM
I hate this thread. Just saying.