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rugcat
09-26-2015, 09:03 PM
It appears that the e-book revolution may be slowing, and books printed on paper are proving to be more resilient than many had feared.
The surprising resilience of print has provided a lift to many booksellers. Independent bookstores, which were battered by the recession and competition from Amazon, are showing strong signs of resurgence. The American Booksellers Association counted 1,712 member stores in 2,227 locations in 2015, up from 1,410 in 1,660 locations five years ago.

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/09/23/business/media/the-plot-twist-e-book-sales-slip-and-print-is-far-from-dead.html?referrer=

AW Admin
09-26-2015, 09:19 PM
I don't think printed books are going to stop being read and published in my lifetime, or for at least a hundred years.

It's a proven technology, and, more importantly, it's portable and, if the book is printed on low-acid paper (most trade publishers do that now) is a durable technology.

There are a lot of people in the world who don't have access to the technology they'd need for ebooks.

Libraries emphasize printed books—not out of dislike of ebooks, but because ebooks are not durable in the way printed books are. Moreover, ebooks are typically accompanied by DRM. That means that they have a limited lifespan, in terms of archival storage.

I think we'll see something similar to the way hardcover books and softcover/paper back books diverged, for printed vs digital, going forward.

WriterBN
09-26-2015, 10:06 PM
Print is not dying any time soon. However, that NYT article is highly misleading, because it only counted e-book sales for publishers who were members of the association it surveyed. That leaves out all the self-published e-books on Amazon, iBooks, Nook, and many small (e-book) presses.

DancingMaenid
09-27-2015, 04:20 AM
I think genre is going to play a role, too. I don't have sales data, but I think ebooks have been great for romance and erotica. I buy much more erotica now than I did before the ebook revolution, because it's easier for me to find stuff that appeals to me.

But with other genres, I'm more likely to buy paper books.

rugcat
09-27-2015, 04:35 AM
Print is not dying any time soon. However, that NYT article is highly misleading, because it only counted e-book sales for publishers who were members of the association it surveyed. That leaves out all the self-published e-books on Amazon, iBooks, Nook, and many small (e-book) presses. I think the salient thing here is not how e-books are doing, but rather that the number of independent bookstores appear to be growing rather than declining and their sales are up.

Kylabelle
09-27-2015, 04:45 AM
That is excellent news, about the booksellers.

We were worried there for a while, some of us, that the independents were doomed.

jjdebenedictis
09-27-2015, 05:38 AM
Maybe part of the resurgence of small bookstores is due to the failure of some of the big-chain bookstores?

My favourite big-box bookstore just closed its prestige, downtown flagship store. That may have just been a side effect of high rents in the area, but then again, the chain seems to be trying to sell greeting cards, knick-knacks, and coffee more than they try to sell books these days.

Maybe the book-buying climate doesn't support those huge stores anymore (because if you're okay with that sort of depersonalized experience, why not go online?), and smaller stores are picking up customers when the big stores inevitably start to downsize the number of locations they have.

shadowwalker
09-27-2015, 06:21 AM
I was never really worried about print books disappearing. I'm still waiting for the paperless society (which was due, well, a while ago...)

Manuel Royal
09-27-2015, 06:31 AM
I was never really worried about print books disappearing. I'm still waiting for the paperless society (which was due, well, a while ago...)Yeah, I started hearing about the "paperless office" thirty years ago. Now there seems to be more paper than ever in the offices I work in. The first time I heard the declaration "Print is dead" was when it was spoken by Harold Ramis' character in the movie Ghostbusters; that was 1983.

Bolero
09-27-2015, 06:39 PM
Not to mention the number of times you see an email with the automatic footer which says "please consider the environment before you print this....." :)

WriterBN
09-27-2015, 08:14 PM
I think the salient thing here is not how e-books are doing, but rather that the number of independent bookstores appear to be growing rather than declining and their sales are up.

Yes, that's encouraging. I wish it were true where I live.

However, the article's title says "e-book sales slip..." and my point was that's not true at all.

Maze Runner
09-27-2015, 08:17 PM
I sure hope print never dies. Nothin' like paper for my preferences.

Laer Carroll
09-27-2015, 11:48 PM
Another report with a similar conclusion is available at GeekWire. See the following link: http://www.geekwire.com/2015/paper-back-real-books-rebound/.

The best (not good, but best) estimate is that ebooks have leveled off at 27% of all book sales.

Both ebooks and "pbooks" have pluses & minuses. Often complementary ones. I read books in both formats because of this.

cmi0616
09-28-2015, 06:28 AM
Yes! I read this article a few days back. I'm really hoping e-readers are just a fad, and that we can move on and, y'know, not destroy the publishing industry.

Claudia Traveller
09-28-2015, 11:56 PM
I'd be very sorry to see the death of the printed book in favour of ebooks. I bought a Kindle a few years ago because I travel a lot and it seemed like a convenient alternative, but I never really got on with it and it's now gathering dust in a cupboard.

Laer Carroll
09-29-2015, 02:36 AM
I'm really hoping e-readers are just a fad, and that we can move on and, y'know, not destroy the publishing industry.

I'd be very sorry to see the death of the printed book in favour of ebooks.
I find it really peculiar that anyone would think that ebooks are going to destroy "pbooks."

The history of technology is that often competing tech shares the market rather than one destroying the other. TV and movies are an example. Both are flourishing. Often a movie that sells well will be bought and re-shown on TV. The popularity of comics-based movies has stimulated the adoption of several TV shows which are based on comics. True, some of those TV shows DON'T do well. But many of them do, at least well enough to keep being renewed.

Ebooks and pbooks are an example of that. Each have strengths and weaknesses. Complementary ones, as it turns out. Increasingly readers read books in BOTH formats.



I bought a Kindle a few years ago because I travel a lot and it seemed like a convenient alternative, but I never really got on with it and it's now gathering dust in a cupboard.

The single-purpose ereader has turned out to be a temporary success which was made obsolete by a multi-purpose consumer device: the tablet. An example of competing tech where one tech DOES lose out to a competitor in the marketplace.

I favor the hi-res mini iPad as an ereader when I travel. Small enough to be convenient to my hands, large enough to show a good chunk of the book. Plus it can do lots of other things: browse the web, act as a calendar, find the closest deli, etc. This does not mean I or anyone else forsakes printed books at home!

Pearl
10-14-2015, 10:52 PM
I think eBooks will become another form of reading a book. You'll have hardcover, softcover, audiobooks and eBooks to choose from - each has its own purpose.

I can't help but wonder if the eBook decline is related to the backlash against self-published books that sometimes have editing problems. Both seem to coincide.

kuwisdelu
10-14-2015, 11:51 PM
Yeah, I started hearing about the "paperless office" thirty years ago. Now there seems to be more paper than ever in the offices I work in. The first time I heard the declaration "Print is dead" was when it was spoken by Harold Ramis' character in the movie Ghostbusters; that was 1983.

People in my department have this really weird habit of downloading textbooks off the internet and then printing out the entire book on departmental printers.

It's really pissing off our department head.

Brightdreamer
10-15-2015, 02:04 AM
People in my department have this really weird habit of downloading textbooks off the internet and then printing out the entire book on departmental printers.

It's really pissing off our department head.

Maybe they need to order custom-watermark printer paper - something cringeworthy, like Precious Moments fan-art (the "adult" version.)

Hapax Legomenon
10-15-2015, 06:14 AM
I find it really peculiar that anyone would think that ebooks are going to destroy "pbooks."

The history of technology is that often competing tech shares the market rather than one destroying the other. TV and movies are an example. Both are flourishing. Often a movie that sells well will be bought and re-shown on TV. The popularity of comics-based movies has stimulated the adoption of several TV shows which are based on comics. True, some of those TV shows DON'T do well. But many of them do, at least well enough to keep being renewed.

Ebooks and pbooks are an example of that. Each have strengths and weaknesses. Complementary ones, as it turns out. Increasingly readers read books in BOTH formats.

Considering when you get an audiobook and a print book and an ebook you're (supposed to) be getting the exact same content, wouldn't it be more like network vs cable vs on-demand streaming tv?

jaycel_lee
10-15-2015, 07:01 AM
I absolutely love my Kindle, but whether I buy print or e-book depends on the genre for me. Like DancingMaenid, I'm more likely to buy romance in e-book form, but I like the feel of a print book for fantasy, middle grade, and young adult. Some books I feel the need to have in both mediums. I'm also likely to lend the print books to friends and family, but it's a pain on Kindle. I guess its a good thing no one I know shares my taste in romance. :Shrug:

I don't want either medium to die out and I really hope e-readers don't give way to tablets, because I much prefer reading on my Paperwhite to reading on my tablet. Eye strain, oh the eye strain...

Jamesaritchie
10-15-2015, 06:40 PM
It appears that the e-book revolution may be slowing, and books printed on paper are proving to be more resilient than many had feared.

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/09/23/business/media/the-plot-twist-e-book-sales-slip-and-print-is-far-from-dead.html?referrer=

Check how many books sold last versus how many books sold in 1920.

Print isn't even sick, let alone dead.

Ravioli
10-15-2015, 10:06 PM
The charm and magic of books, to me, is not just the content. There are two things that add life and soul to a dwelling (again, my opinion): plants, and a shelf full of books. There's something about holding a book, carrying one around, shelving it. E-books are convenient for everyone involved, but they are 100% devoid of charm. I will keep buying paperbacks from time to time. For price and convenience, I like e-books, but paperbacks will always have a special place in my heart and home.

NateSean
10-15-2015, 10:30 PM
Print isn't going anywhere, and here are my reasons.

1: It would be impossible to get an author to sign your ereader. At the very least, it would be hard to clean the sharpie marks off of your screen.

2: People like to touch and to hold things. I can see pictures of my nephews and nieces. But no picture will ever be the same as getting to hold my brothers' children for the first time and interact with them. I felt roughly the same way when I held my copy of Prince Lestat.

A book in print makes a much better gift. True, you can give someone an e-book, but is that really the same as when you get a parcel in the mail, from your baby sister, on your 31st birthday, and see that it's a shiny hardcover copy of The Wolf Gift?

Your mileage may vary, of course, but that's why I don't think print is going anywhere.

Roxxsmom
10-15-2015, 11:02 PM
Maybe they need to order custom-watermark printer paper - something cringeworthy, like Precious Moments fan-art (the "adult" version.)

That would be a great revenge prank to play on those people who print up a job on colored paper, then forget to put the white paper back in the default copier tray.

WriteMinded
10-18-2015, 07:48 PM
I'd be very sorry to see the death of the printed book in favour of ebooks. I bought a Kindle a few years ago because I travel a lot and it seemed like a convenient alternative, but I never really got on with it and it's now gathering dust in a cupboard.I bought my kindle to read some self-pubs and to get cheaper buys. The cost of ebooks (by established authors) has gone up. I will NOT pay that much for an ebook. Books in my genre, I sometimes use for reference, and I find it very difficult to zoom around on a Kindle. I suppose someday that will improve, but I won't be out buying another one for that reason alone. I can read in bed without keeping my husband awake. I must admit it is very easy on my sensitive eyes. There ends its usefulness. Paper, please.


People in my department have this really weird habit of downloading textbooks off the internet and then printing out the entire book on departmental printers.

It's really pissing off our department head.Seems a good way to get fired, and deservedly so.

AW Admin
10-18-2015, 08:13 PM
I think the salient thing here is not how e-books are doing, but rather that the number of independent bookstores appear to be growing rather than declining and their sales are up.

Yep, and not just in the U.S.; all over.

And the "after market," the sales of used books, is also up.

That's actually good news for authors; used book sales like library sales can drive new sales.

cmi0616
10-21-2015, 01:19 AM
I find it really peculiar that anyone would think that ebooks are going to destroy "pbooks."


Actually, that's not what I meant. I'm kind of agnostic on the e-books/p-books debate. I prefer print books, but not for any reason that I can actually articulate. I guess I grew up reading them and reading a novel on a screen seems weird and off-putting. That said, even if print books were to go extinct, of course I'd still read e-books, and I'd probably eventually get used to it.

What I was talking about is that the under-cutting e-publishers practice is bad for literature as an industry. Here's an article that touches on some of the reasons why. (http://www.baltimorefishbowl.com/stories/letter-to-america-from-mouth-breathing-idiot/)

noirdood
12-26-2015, 11:06 PM
Print ain't dead yet and won't be as long as I have my crayons.

letthejuicesflow
01-11-2016, 07:10 AM
I think genre is going to play a role, too. I don't have sales data, but I think ebooks have been great for romance and erotica. I buy much more erotica now than I did before the ebook revolution, because it's easier for me to find stuff that appeals to me.

But with other genres, I'm more likely to buy paper books.

ebook seems to be the main venue for the erotica I read. I have a few shelves of print in that genre but more than that on my ereader. I would prefer the paper form. but not much of those authors are printed. so many of them only do electronic format. and then, like recently, if you do not download the book and they remove it from the ebook supplier, all I have is the sample. Hate that!